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2012 Prius V 120K service interval questions

Discussion in 'Gen 1 Prius Plug-in 2012-2015' started by pkhoury, May 14, 2024.

  1. pkhoury

    pkhoury Proud TDI owner

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    I used to own a 2007 Prius, but a gal I'm dating has a 2012 Prius Plug-In and wants me to help her with an oil change and some other things. I found some old threads, but opted to start a new thread.

    What kinds of things should be changed at 120K? Also, how much different are oil changes vs the 2007 I used to have? I see that the oil filter is in a housing now, instead of a screw on canister like I had on my 2007. I personally prefer a filter in a housing, as that's what I'm used to with my TDIs. I've read some things about inverter and coolant flushes. Any specific kind of coolant that needs to be used? I'm sure it's not the crappy generic green stuff you get from the parts store, and I'm guessing it's not like VW's G13 pink coolant I use in everything here (farm equipment, truck, tractor, etc), though I wonder if that could work (G13 is fantastic stuff).

    Do spark plugs need to be changed, and if so, do they need to be gapped? Any idea on what size socket pulls plugs out? This will be the first gasoline engine I've done any work on in about 8 or 9 years, save for my lawn mower.

    So to recap, what I know about so far:
    • oil/filter
    • cabin air filter
    • engine air filter
    • spark plugs (maybe)
    • brake pads and rotors (maybe)
    If the brakes need to be changed, are any special tools required to press the piston back into the cylinder? If that's required, I might do a fluid flush/bleed for her, as those are pretty easy to do. Also, are suspension items something that wears out on the Prius like on most cars that are 12 years old? Shocks/struts/control arm bushings/tie rod ends/etc?
     
    #1 pkhoury, May 14, 2024
    Last edited: May 14, 2024
  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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  3. pkhoury

    pkhoury Proud TDI owner

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    She said her car is a V, but said it's a 2012 Prius Plug-In, which is why I posted it here. I'm not really up to date on the difference, having not kept up on them since I knew somewhat about the first and second gen.
     
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  4. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    if it's a plug in, you're in the right place. but they only had base and advanced models.
     
  5. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    one important thing that is not in the maintenance schedule is cleaning the egr circuit before it blows the head gasket. you tube videos are available, and lots of threads here.
    another is a tranny fluid replacement.
     
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  6. pkhoury

    pkhoury Proud TDI owner

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    Ugh, EGR. Got rid of that on my TDI, but not really an option on her car. I presume they get gummed up with oil and particulate, just like on a diesel with an EGR? I actually didn't know gas cars had EGRs, but it makes sense.

    I'll have to youtube tranny replacement, but I'll probably set aside another day to do that. I was hoping to do brake pads/rotors/fluid, oil/filter, both air filters, shocks/struts and spark plugs in one day. I guess I got lucky and I'm 99% sure I have a 9/16 plug socket in my toolbox that came with a big lot of snap-on stuff from a government auction (I always knew I'd use it someday).

    I did watch youtube videos on doing the front struts and I must say - a helluva lot easier than doing the same on a TDI, where you need to use a strut expander to get it off the wheel knuckle (what a royal PITA). The video did list torque specs, but is there a sticky with official torque specs for bolts? For the wiper cowl and metal cover below it, I was just planning on snugging those bolts up by hand. I'm not that fond of these youtube videos that use an impact to snug up bolts. I was taught to hand tighten, and then use a ratchet to snug up, and then a torque wrench if there's a specific torque spec.
     
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  7. pkhoury

    pkhoury Proud TDI owner

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    She's not a car person, so she doesn't know if it's a V, but we both know for a fact it's the 2012 plug-in. I think the headlights are different from the regular 2012 model. Things for me got confusing with the Prius C and V and whatever other variants there are. When I had the 2007, we just went by packages, and that made things a lot easier (as they were still the same car, same parts, just different options).
     
  8. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    yes, gummed up egr, intake manifold ports, etc.
    if it has power drivers seat, it's advanced. otherwise base, not that it matters for maintenance.
     
  9. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    i've never done brakes, but there should be threads here. @Mendel Leisk is an expert.
    suspension is the same as any car. wear and tear due to road quality and driving style vary.
     
  10. pkhoury

    pkhoury Proud TDI owner

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    I figured as much. When I bought both my 2002 Golfs, I replaced all that stuff - LCA (with solid Audi TT bushings), swaybar links, ball joints, replaced pads and rotors. Basically a full suspension refresh and new tierods (though I probably won't do those for her car).
     
  11. Cadenza

    Cadenza Member

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    Former Mk4 VW/Audi driver here and current '15 Plugin Prius owner. I'd like to do my own wrenching and find the Prius much easier to work on than VAG cars. I would do the following if my Prius had 120k miles...

    1. Obtain maintenance records of what's been done or ignored.

    2. Do the typical oil+filter, engine air filter and cabin air filter. If the car has not begun to consume oil, regular oil level check is important. Gen3 Prii are known to develop a nasty oil drinking habit due to crappy oil control ring design. (Toyota once repaired this problem for free and offered an extended warranty.) EGR gas (#4) also gunk up the oil rings (stuck) which will let oil slip into the compression chambers. Short oil change interval (5-6k synthetic) helps keep the rings clean.

    3. If she stuck to the maintenance book, then ATF, engine & Inverter coolant, spark plugs and brake fluid are more likely original. Replace them all. I'd would replace the electric (engine) coolant pump and thermostat too. Make sure the replacements are OEM.

    4. EGR Circuit + PCV: unlike on diesel engines where people know that the EGR system is a maintenance item, Toyota didn't specify it for the Gen 3 Prius. The system gets clogged up slowly and causes the engine to rattle. The circuit begins at the EGR cooler => EGR valve => pipe => Intake Manifold. It's a tedious job and some people would buy new parts (or used parts and cleaned them) and switch them out to minimize down time. With the Intake removed, replace the PCV as well.

    5. Suspension: swaybar bushings/links, control arm bushings, tie-rods, struts/shocks, mount-bearings all need inspection... as well as CV boots. Struts/shocks (OEM/KYB) are cheap for the Prius.

    6. Brake: check pad wear. When flushing the brakes, check/lube the sliding pins.

    7. HV battery fans and filter. Clean if clogged/dirty. Plugin is actually easier to do than the regular Prius.

    There're plenty of youtube videos... NutzAboutBolts is a good source.
     
    #11 Cadenza, May 21, 2024
    Last edited: May 21, 2024
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  12. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Luddite

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    Heck, they're doing their level best to sweep it under the rug:
    upload_2024-5-21_11-55-24.png

    LaLa Land is not in the salt belt? If there is road salt where you are, an occasional clean up and application of of rust prevention measures is worthwhile:

    IMG_4200.jpeg
     
  13. Cadenza

    Cadenza Member

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    EGR issues on Gen3 is like Direct Injection on German cars. The intake side gets sooty but manufacturers didn't specify cleaning as it won't be a problem till after the warranty is gone. Besides removing & cleaning the intake manifold, they would blast the intake side & valves with crushed walnut shells....



    Typical EGR service on a 4-cylinder diesel Hyundai...



    LALA land = Los Angeles County. If you get too much rain up there, send it to us.
     
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  14. pkhoury

    pkhoury Proud TDI owner

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    I'm finding some things are easier than my mk4 and other things are a little more difficult. Thanks for the advice below:
    Wouldn't brake fluid just be DOT4, which is pretty generic? I picked up Bosch Double Iridium spark plugs and a 9/16 spark plug socket (since I obviously have no need for such a socket in my toolbox). Also, these engines use timing chains, right? I'll look up videos on replacing the t-stat and water pump; those I would definitely buy OEM and not Chinesium junk.
    More like a deletion item. I'll never have to worry about that again, but since some counties in Texas do emissions checks (diesels are exempt; gassers aren't), deleting it obviously isn't an option.

    I'll see what videos pop up for this. I've seen some NASTY intakes on mk4 TDIs, that amazed me the engine even functioned at all, with how little airflow was available to the intake manifold

    I'm replacing the swaybar links. Didn't think about the bushings. My mind is set on the mk4 (I own 4 of them plus some parts cars), so I didn't think of all of that in my mind. Thought about replacing LCAs/bushings, but don't know if there are upgraded options (like Audi TT bushings for the mk4 VW being an upgrade, as its stiffer). The wheel bearings are all bolt on, right?
     
  15. pkhoury

    pkhoury Proud TDI owner

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    Found his videos and looks like it's easy peasy. Now I need to see if I have a 10mm hex socket, or hope the parts store has one, as my Snap-On dealer doesn't come to my area until Wednesday. I might tackle EGR another day, but I'll definitely keep it in the back of my mind.