Changed the 12v Battery. Now Getting Codes? P3000 P0A80

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Technical Discussion' started by egon10psi, Apr 30, 2020.

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  1. egon10psi

    egon10psi Junior Member

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    About 4 weeks ago my wife's 12v battery died in her 2005 Prius. We replaced it with a brand new battery. She drove it a few days after without any problems. Outside of the P1121 code (coolant control valve) that we have decided to live with for the last 18 months.

    Well then Coronavirus happened and the car sat for about 2 weeks. We drove it for the first time and the dash lit up. WE had the codes read and this is what was found:

    P3000
    P0A80

    A quick google search will tell you this is the hybrid battery and that it's not good. The car has a Doorman replacement from just 3 years ago. There are 165,000 miles on the car.

    I uninstalled and reinstalled the 12v battery. All of the codes went away for a 10-mile drive. She took to the grocery store today and the lights came back on as well as the VSC light.

    I was wondering if there is anything we could have done when installing the 12v battery? Or are there any other troubleshooting steps we can take before deciding that it is, in fact, the hybrid battery.

    We would rather not pay Toyota the 2,800 dollars if we don't have to.

    Thank you!
     
  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    the old cells can deteriorate from sitting. how about 'newpriusbatteries.com' for $1,600.?

    can you diy?
     
  3. egon10psi

    egon10psi Junior Member

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    I suppose.... Really trying to avoid that route if I can. I was hoping we could try a few other, cheaper/easier, things first.
     
  4. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    either the car starts, or it doesn't. if it does, the 12v isn't an issue. who read the codes, a prius code reader, along with the service manual will give you definitive information.
     
  5. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

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  6. dolj

    dolj Senior Member

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    That is a good run from a second-hand battery which is what you got from Dorman (knowingly or not). You might be interested to know that Dorman no longer warrantees their repurposed second-hand batteries for 3 years any longer.
    By removing the 12 V battery gave the car amnesia, so of course, the lights went off. That is until the symptoms occurred again and the lights go back on. Not all codes can be cleared this way, but the Battery ECU codes can be. For sure, giving the car amnesia does not fix anything.
    While, on the face of it, there may appear to be a correlation, in fact, it is more likely the HV (hybrid vehicle) battery was already in a weakened state, and sitting for two weeks pushed it over the edge. So, it is really nothing to do with the way you installed the 12 V battery.
    The going rate at any competitive Toyota dealer should be $2150 - $2250 (OTD), with the replacement battery cost being ~$1,700 + taxes. It would pay to shop around, if possible. Then there is the $1,600 (delivered) DIY after-market option that bisco mentioned. Both of these options are for NEW modules and cannot be compared in any way to any of the (abundance) of second-hand offerings. Read their marketing information very carefully as a few like to word it in such a way as to give you the feeling you are getting something new or improved.
    If you have a scanner that can display live data from the battery ECU, you could look at the block voltages within the HV battery and even how they behave when you drive around accelerating or braking. But that will only confirm the diagnosis.

    If you can consider a steep learning curve, investment in some equipment, and can DIY, a cheaper (but not quicker) option would be to diagnose the failing module or modules. This would be economic for up to maybe 4 modules maximum unless you enjoy doing this job over and over as a new module fails. At $50 - $70 to buy a module (second-hand/used, you cannot buy new – nor would you want to unless doing all modules) that might be slightly better than what you already have, it will eventually become uneconomical to continue on that path. At best this is just a stop-gap measure to get you back on the road. Depending on the stock of modules you can get and the effort you are willing to put into it, a repair like this might last (1 - 6 months) to (1- 3 years).

    A better (and next best to brand new) DIY option would be to acquire a complete (and untouched < 5 yo) pack from a recent (the more recent the better) Gen 2, Gen 3, or Gen 4 (make sure it is NiMH) wreck. Be warned these are not easy to find, as the rebuilding community swoop in on them very quickly. The Gen 3 and Gen 4 modules will need to be transplanted from their case into your Gen 2 case. If the Gen 2 HV battery was still in good working order (at the time of the crash) and hasn't sat around for too long, you can just swap it straight in.

    If the car is in very good cosmetic and mechanical condition, you really should consider an all NEW module solution, then you can put this all behind you for another 10 - 15 years.

    I hope I don't come across too preachy, but we are starting to see a lot Gen 2 Prius coming through with this same story.
     
    #6 dolj, May 1, 2020
    Last edited: May 1, 2020
  7. egon10psi

    egon10psi Junior Member

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    Not preachy at all. That was very informative and helpful. Thank you!
     
  8. egon10psi

    egon10psi Junior Member

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    I just called my local Toyota. They said 3,300 for the battery and 500 for labor. :(
     
  9. dolj

    dolj Senior Member

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    They are having a laugh, are there other dealers from whom you can get a quote? Ask around and see if they can do a better price.

    If you care to, and you have better prices from other dealers, you can then go back to you could ask them how they can justify that price when you know the wholesale price is $1,650, and the retail is $1,950 but there are dealers selling for $1700 + tax. If you don't ask you don't get
     
    #9 dolj, May 1, 2020
    Last edited: May 1, 2020
  10. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    Allow me to share some of my experiences with 3 Dorman HV batteries. I've had 3 customers (2 of which are fellow members of the forum) who had Dorman packs that failed. All three of these batteries came into my possession, as they were replaced by a TMR-JWAP battery. Although the batteries all had some minor assembly issues noticed during disassembly, they all had just one or two failed modules. The remaining modules were in surprising good condition. In the big scheme of things, I sometimes think I would rather have a Dorman turned into me than an OEM.

    Good things about the Dorman:
    1. They do test every module and they provide a matched set of 28. In the real world, there's no guarantee that one of the modules won't fail tomorrow, but they do the best they can.
    2. The busbars on all 3 that I disassembled were nickel plated and I have to admit, they had very minimal corrosion. What they did have, practically just wiped off.
    3. None of the three had any ECU pin corrosion issues.
    In my personal opinion, if a DIYer wants to fix his/her own battery by just installing one or two modules to replace some failed ones, you can't have a better starting point than a recently failed Dorman.

    In most cases, I think the bad modules could be replaced, the pack reassembled with no further module testing/cycling, and then just put it in the car and go.
     
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  11. egon10psi

    egon10psi Junior Member

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    Question. Even with all of the lights on the car still starts and drive normal. Also, the battery/motor screen still shows the battery working as it should?
     
  12. egon10psi

    egon10psi Junior Member

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    I remembered that I have an OBDII Reader and downloaded the Dr.Prius app. This is what I found.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    #12 egon10psi, May 10, 2020
    Last edited: May 10, 2020
  13. Gino Veltri

    Gino Veltri Junior Member

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    I’m considering this option as I’ve got a good amount of experience and don’t mind the time involved in whackamole. But after replacing modules should one rebalance the battery? I’ve got the same codes and think I’m interpreting the battery monitor correctly in that one (might as well replace both) cells in bank 4 is starting to go. So can I replace them abs pop it back in? Hoping it’ll balance itself out?
     

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  14. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    One problem with your graph is that you're looking at it while the battery is being charged and indicators for a bad module can be opposite of what you may think. A low capacity module being charged will often show a higher voltage.

    The best thing to do is to look at the voltage readings after the car has sat overnight, at a minimum. With your foot off the brake, press the power button 2 times. That will put the car in "IG-ON" condition, where the car will power up, but the engine will not start. This ensures the HV battery will NOT be charged and you can get accurate voltage readings. You'll likely see the weak links show up a bit more clearly. The longer you can let the car sit, the more likely the weak module(s) will self discharge enough to be obvious.

    In a perfect world, it would be great to have the time and equipment to cycle all the modules and get capacity values. That would give you the needed information to build a well balanced battery. In the real world, that option isn't always available. Many batteries have lasted years with a simple module swap. Many have lasted only months. It comes down to the Lebron James theory of module replacement. That's explained in the post linked below.

    Inconsistent Hybrid battery readings | PriusChat
     
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