Clunk eliminated after changing the driver's side control arm...wooo hooo!!

Discussion in 'Prime Main Forum (2017-Current)' started by Jeffrimerman, Sep 11, 2021.

  1. Jeffrimerman

    Jeffrimerman Member

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    Just wanted to share in case someone searches for the same issue. I had a clunk on the left side and changed the sway bar links that did need changing and the ball joint and it felt tighter but still a clunk. Got a moog control arm that came with the ball joint and drove around and no clunk when going over bumps. Didn't have to pry the gearbox out of the way. Was able to jack up the left side and that was enough room. I'll recheck the alignment since it was driving for so long with a bad control arm with play.
     
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  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    well done!(y)
     
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  3. edthefox5

    edthefox5 Senior Member

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    Pretty sure it’s the lca’s are what’s causing the clunking on a high mileage G2 also.

    Roads are very good where I live but if I drive over grass where they are articulating fast I can hear them clunk.

    There so big and heavy and lots of gear are connected to it so hard to see exactly if it’s getting loose in its mounts by hand manipulation without removing the ball joint. When you replaced the ball joint where you able to feel any side looseness in its joints?
     
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  4. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    Is that this bit:

    5C4CD921-0438-43F8-B2E9-38325B1C1CCB.jpeg
    did you torque the bolts with the suspension loaded? I think you’re supposed to. I’ve got some PDFs rattling around somewhere.
     
  5. Jeffrimerman

    Jeffrimerman Member

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    When I took out the old LCA it looked fine. I couldn't move the 2 bushing joints at all. I imagine a couple tons of momentum they are probably like butter so I was kinda shooting in the dark hoping that was the issue. I remember before I felt a clunk that the road noise was there but maybe there was a clunk for years and I just never noticed since it was small. Now the ride is quiet more like a new car.

    Mendel - yes that's the part. It's easier than it looks. One nut on the ball joint and the other 2 long bolts and it comes out. I didn't torque with the suspension loaded but it's 101 ft lbs of torque and I had to go crazy to get that click at 101 ft lbs. I'll keep an eye on them.
     
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  6. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    Here's that info. It does say to temporarily snug bolts, reinstall wheels, lower car, give it a few bounces, then torque (note higher torque value too):

    upload_2021-9-12_12-37-5.png
     
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  7. Jeffrimerman

    Jeffrimerman Member

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    Holy nuts and bolts Batman, 172 fl lbs of torque. I was way off going by what someone on a priuschat stated when I googled. My wrench doesn't even go that high. I imagine at a shop it's easier since it can be resting on the wheels and up in the air. I should be able to do the bolt toward the rear which is the one that would be more impacted by resting weight. Thanks Mendel for those docs.
     
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  8. Jeffrimerman

    Jeffrimerman Member

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    I noticed I'm missing some plastic body screw thingies. Can I use these from amazon? Maybe they have toyota ones also. Looks like toyota uses a few different styles. I need the wheel well ones and the ones holding the cover under the car.
     
  9. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    Generic may work, or may be frustrating. I find the straight-from-Toyota site best for small fasteners:


    Toyota Parts and Accessories - Official Online Store


    It's a little clunky, but drill down to your vehicle (maybe have to start by choosing hybrid), and look under the first part pic, sometimes there's "more images". And sometimes fasteners are just linked, you have to root around, find where they are.
     
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  10. PT Guy

    PT Guy Senior Member

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    A torque wrench for that range will be about 24" long and cost about $200-250, with a max setting of 250 lbs-ft and a 1/2" square drive. A rental shop may have one. If necessary a piece of steel pipe a foot or more long can be slipped over the end for more leverage. Be sure to use a good 6-point torque socket; you don't want the socket to slip or break or damage the nut.
     
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  11. Jeffrimerman

    Jeffrimerman Member

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    For some reason the torque spec on the gen 2 is 101 ft lbs. Not that it matters just interesting. Maybe the body of the car was thinner metal so they didn't want to stress it too much.
     
  12. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    Too, it's important to have the suspension loaded (car back on the ground, wheels on, bounced a few times to settle it).

    Something like this Amazon.ca offering:

    upload_2021-9-17_11-18-28.png

    Length is a bit over two feet, price is in CDN $'s. Local automotive/hardware place has it for the same price, for 3 days mid-month:

    6EF94631-1734-4FE7-8135-A4E36AA3FE27.jpeg
     
  13. burrito

    burrito Member

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    They do make bigger torque wrenches. 3/4" ones can go up to 600 ft lbs. Of course, they're also more expensive.
     
  14. PT Guy

    PT Guy Senior Member

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    While we've veered off topic...the very large diesel engines I've worked on don't use torque wrenches. The important bolts are stretched to spec, then the nut run down snug. The studs of the individual cylinder heads, in a circle around the 96 cm (37.8") diameter cylinder, had a group of hydraulic jacks on a circular frame. This "candelabra" was set over the studs, screwed to the studs, the cylinders were sized to give the correct stretch, 10,000 psi hydraulic pressure applied, and the nuts either removed or installed with a foot-long "tommy" bar to screw them down. The same principle for the 10" diameter tie rods that tie the foundation bed plate to the top of the engine casting 3 stories above...an individual jack sized to give it the right stretch while the nut, so heavy it was lifted with the gantry crane, was run up or run down with the tommy bar. We had an emergency impact wrench, about the size of a jack hammer, but never used it. The same hydraulic system was used in the crankcase by the crew of workmen in it, except the hold-down bolts for the main bearings were the jacks themselves. Jack them to spec, tighten the locking nut, and that's where they live holding down the bearing housings. This was a powerful engine in its day...straight 12 cylinder two stroke diesel producing 57,500 hp at 95 rpm (red line), reversible, directly connected to the propeller shaft, burning heavy black fuel oil at 250°F. Today's engines are up to 104,000 hp in a similar sized engine.
     
  15. burrito

    burrito Member

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    How can I get one of those into my Prius?
     
  16. PT Guy

    PT Guy Senior Member

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    A 1,700 ton engine? It'll take some thought....

    The camshaft on this engine is so long that the twist in the shaft is accounted for in timing the engine. The camshaft drives the fuel injection pumps and the hydraulic cylinders that activate the exhaust valves in the head. This is a uniflow 2-stroke. Induction of new air comes from the turbochargers through the ports in the lower part of the cylinder liner when the piston uncovers the ports. Exhaust gas exits through one big exhaust valve in the head. The exhaust valve is opened by its hydraulic system and closes with a compressed air spring--a compressed air cylinder around the valve shaft. Cut off the 100 psi service air and all 12 exhaust valves drop open!...quick way to stop the engine. There are 3 compressed air systems--450 psi starting air for input directly into the cylinders to roll the engine to start, 100 psi service air for the shop, exhaust valves, and elsewhere, and 30 psi air for control systems.
     
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