considering a 2007 Prius with 89k miles and aftermarket battery

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Main Forum' started by Tcejorp, Nov 6, 2020.

  1. Tcejorp

    Tcejorp New Member

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    Hi all, about to go check out a prius this weekend that looks very clean and is a one owner car with oil changes done on time on record. My main concern is the battery, if the battery goes bad i will want to get an oem toyota replacement brand new which is 1600 from the dealer, apparently i need to put a refundable 1300 down as a core charge but they will not accept aftermarket batteries as core. I don't want to replace with another aftermarket battery when it inevitably fails, what is best way of getting an unmolested dead battery for cheap that i can use for a core when the time comes? a junkyard? am i thinking about this all wrong, i will be having a shop fully inspect the car before buying but even if they say the battery is good i imagine it can still go out at any time. Please offer some insight on this the car is being offered for 6900 USD and looks mint.
     
  2. Tcejorp

    Tcejorp New Member

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    Just thought i should clarify things, apparently the battery is not aftermarket, it was just "refurbished" and had it's cover stripped and painted green. I called a mobile hybrid guy and he assured me he could make that battery look untampered replacing the shell and replacing any modules that might have "been written on with a sharpie". Is it that simple? are there no warranty stickers or tabs?
     
  3. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Sounds like a great car... Excited for you! Do you like to work on cars and learn how to do stuff that grows your skills? If so you're looking at the right car and asking the right questions at the right forum. But if you're hands off and don't work on cars and don't have someone who has good prices who's familiar with hybrids it can get stupidly expensive real quick. You'll know if your mechanic doesn't work on hybrids if the try to tell you that the brake rotors are bad. Mechanics who don't understand hybrid systems wrongly say that.

    And yes the mobile hybrid guy will be able to pull that off for you... Also when you purchase the new replacement battery you'll be able to double check that effort because you basically put your old core in the container that the new pack came in and you just have to make it have the exact same parts with no signs of aftermarket branding like a painted cover or stickers on the modules. I don't think'll they mind sharpie writing on the modules, that's pretty common in old packs that have been worked on by mechanic or DIY and never heard of someone not getting their core deposit back for sharpie writing. It's the branding and painting of parts that they don't like.

    Also keep in mind because your existing battery was "refurbished" it will be good for 3 months to 3 years, which buys you enough time to consider all your options... In less than a year hopefully there will be a more modern lithium replacement pack on the market that will perform way better than a new OEM pack and will cost way less too. I currently have one of these in my '07 for final testing before production begins and the pack is better in every way.

    Also if you like to work on cars, sometimes you can find used packs at the wrecking yard for as low as $50 and you can take it home and recondition/rebuild the pack very inexpensively and then you'll not only have a back up pack on the shelf ready to throw in your car the moment the existing one goes bad, but you'll also know how to fix the packs yourself so you can just swap 'em out and fix it later whenever you have a problem.
     
    #3 PriusCamper, Nov 6, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2020
    GrayRaceCat and Tcejorp like this.
  4. Tcejorp

    Tcejorp New Member

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    Thank you very much for the response, the shop i'm taking car to is one that specializes on Toyota and works on/services hybrids. I would guess it's pretty easy to tell how the car is just driving it around for a while, my main concern is the battery health that the shop will check. The carfax shows that oil changes were done every 5k miles which leads me to believe it's powertrain is healthy especially it being a one owner car, drive belts and heater control valve were replaced about 6 months ago. One question I'm not sure of is the hybrid battery testing a competent shop would do, with good results giving me the okay to buy the car can the battery still crap out on me a few months down the line or less? It seems like a gamble but i'm willing given the service history and condition of car. How do you think the core exchange works? like do i give them the core when i pick up the battery they special order or do i have to give them the core first for them to investigate it before ordering? The mobile hybrid guy insisted that it's more than likely an oem battery just spray painted that can be reverted with the casings he has.
     
  5. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

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  6. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    I get the sense you're gonna have the shop do all this work for you and they're gonna charge more than you'd pay if you'd DIY it... But on the bright side the core deposit is their problem not yours.

    As for hybrid battery "testing" by a competent shop, they don't really do that because to them working on packs is working on a car that's eventually going to come back for more work on the pack. That's not how a shop with lots of overhead can operate, which is why us small time hobbyist have cornered this niche market with mobile/at home servicing. A regular shop will just replace the pack with new. So if they say the pack seems good, they mean it's good for now, not because they inspected all its most common points of failure.
     
  7. GrayRaceCat

    GrayRaceCat New Member

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    If the shop has the Toyota Techstream software, then they should be able to provide you with Voltage & Resistance Values for each of the individual battery modules. A good start in determining potential failure.



     
    #7 GrayRaceCat, Nov 17, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2020
  8. edthefox5

    edthefox5 Senior Member

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    Are you nuts a 2007 prius and your looking at close to $9000?
     
  9. PriusHead05

    PriusHead05 Junior Member

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    Do you know why they had to do whatever they did with the battery? Did it fail totally? Did one or two packs fail? Did they think that was the problem, but really it was something else?

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
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