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Front Brake Job questions

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by pghsebring, Dec 16, 2021.

  1. pghsebring

    pghsebring Junior Member

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    Been a while since I've done one on my 3rd Gen (2015.)

    Is it recommended you don't use a C clamp to push the fluid back in, but instead bleed it out and top it up?

    Is there a Toyota specific brake fluid (if some is bled out) and slide pin grease? What size is the little hose i want to put on my bleeder valve if that's the route I go?

    I know I'm supposed to unplug the 12V btw.
     
  2. tankyuong

    tankyuong Senior Member

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    C clamp is fine just do it slowly
     
  3. Ed Beaty

    Ed Beaty Active Member

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    "I know I'm supposed to unplug the 12V btw."

    Good. Now wait for Mendel Leisk to come along to set you straight on the rest of it. And a c-clamp is fine, just make sure it is centered exactly on the piston before applying pressure.
     
  4. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Luddite

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    Is the front piston plastic? IIRC it is. I'd put a piece of plywood on the rim of it, to spread the load of the C-clamp.

    I never opened bleed screw when pushing the piston in: it's just a can-of-worms I don't want to open, in case the car freaks. I do replace quart of brake fluid tri-yearly though, using Toyota DOT3, and following the Repair Manual instruction for brake bleed without Techstream (attached). Also, I disconnect the neg cable from the 12 volt battery before doing any disassembly. And leave it thus till everything's reassembled, AND I've pushed the brake pedal a bunch of times, taken up any slack.

    For lube, I used Permatex Anti-Seize, a thin/uniform applicationon all points of contacts between pad backs and shims, and calipers. For the caliper glide pins, if I relube them I used Sil-Glyde Brake Lubricant. This is my personal choice, something readily available, and I've used for decades, on various cars, with no problems. Someone may be along shortly to explain why I'm a bad influence.

    Addendum: Repair Manual brake excerpts added:
     
    #4 Mendel Leisk, Dec 16, 2021
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2021
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  5. xliderider

    xliderider Senior Member

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    Sil-Glyde silicone grease is to prevent the slide pin rubber boots and seals from breaking down or swelling.

    It doesn't contain petroleum products in it, like anti seize compound or traditional grease that can cause previously mentioned problems.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  6. pghsebring

    pghsebring Junior Member

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    Like i said this was from memory and i had some vague memory that for some reason you couldn't push the piston in on this model but i must have remembered wrong, it is a lot easier when you don't have to do the bleed/refill method so that is good. Also avoids buying more stuff which is good.
     
  7. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Luddite

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    Some subscribe to opening the bleed valve, and have plausible reasons. I think it's more necessary if you're not doing a perdiodic brake fluid replacement. I've made it this far without ever doing that (opening bleed valve when pushing back pistons), and I think with the Prius I'd be more nervous: the brake bleed instruction (attached above) says you should be in Invalid Mode. Maybe for a quick blip you're ok, especially with 12 volt disconnected, but I'd just rather not go there.
     
  8. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    You are refering to the rear brake calipers. You have to screw them back in.
    If you use a medium sized pry bar you push the piston back, on the fronts, before removing
    the calipers. I wedge it between the outer pad and caliper so I don't chance damaging
    the disk.

     
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  9. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Luddite

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    Don't forget, front caliper pistons are some sort of plastic, avoid point-loads when pushing them back.
     
  10. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    I totally don't get your incessantly, deliberately trolling attitude.

    We're here to get the best information to readers on PriusChat, right? Is that why we're here? To kind of, you know, help people?

    Is there anything wrong with you having a personal grease preference that disregards what Toyota recommends? Not at all! No reason not to have that preference, talk about it all day long. No problem.

    But you stop, every last single time, at partial disclosure.

    It is good that you say this much:

    But you know the rest, and and you deliberately leave it out every time. It's not like it's hard to say: your personal choice is a silicone product, and the Toyota-specified 08887-01206 is a non-silicone, glycol product, and you don't know why they specify that but they consistently do, and have reaffirmed it a bunch of times when asked, but you like your stuff and you haven't noticed any problems.

    That would be a perfectly honest and responsible way to say it, and it isn't difficult at all. Then readers are empowered to make their own judgments with the facts at hand.

    The worst part is I am totally sure that you get this, because I am sure I remember seeing you expect proper disclosure from other people here on some other topics.
     
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  11. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    ????? I don't understand what you mean?
    If you use a clamp, you leave the pad in, so you don't damage the puck.
    Though some don't do that.
    "I wedge it between the outer pad and caliper so I don't chance damaging
    the disk."
    I don't care about damaging the pad, which doesn't damage it, because I'm replacing them.
    And that will put even pressure on the puck as it's pressed back.


     
  12. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Luddite

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    Yeah as long as old pad is on piston, or something similar. At least one report here, a clamp directly on piston rim, not spread out load, cracked the piston.
     
  13. ColoradoBoo

    ColoradoBoo Senior Member

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    I've done lots of brake jobs (front and back) but have, yet, to do one on a hybrid. For bleeding the brakes, I've tried many ways and not really happy until I tried using an oil extraction pump device which seems to be very good for doing it alone and does a pretty good job pumping out a cup or so of brake fluid rather quickly without making a mess everywhere. Always use new brake fluid from a new can since any old cans will absorb any moisture in them which is bad. (Dot 3/4 is fine) I dump the old stuff in a small box with kitty litter in it to dispose of it...not recyclable and will ruin oil if mixed with it.
     
  14. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Luddite

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    Local to me Toyota dealership took my used brake fluid; something you might check out.

    they’re likely dealing with large quantities, have a place to recycle. Hopefully…:unsure:

    Addendum: i do see a lot of recommendations for kitty litter method; I have used that for some solvents, like brake cleaner for example.
     
    #14 Mendel Leisk, Dec 17, 2021
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2021
  15. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    They will dump the brake fluid into the old engine oil tank....
     
  16. pghsebring

    pghsebring Junior Member

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    Huh I always removed the caliper and then used a giant c-clamp on an object that distributes the force (old pad, chunk of wood etc) but now i see what you're saying looking at videos, may be easier to compress them before i even loosen the slide pins, using leverage. I will see if there is the right size bar at the shop when i go.
     
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  17. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    Some people wear the pads down to the medal, damaging the rotor with a huge lip.
    I couldn't get he pads out or caliper off. That's how I figured out, there was no other way.
    On some calipers you can use large channel locks to grip the back of the caliper and
    the pad or rotor and squeeze it enough to get the pads off the caliper.


     
  18. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Luddite

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    These are sweet, but I don't think I'll ever get one, just use a big C-clamp:

    upload_2021-12-18_7-42-9.png

    Where they are very handy, is with dual piston calipers. I could have used it this time:

    upload_2021-12-18_7-46-47.png
    (Honda Pilot front brakes.)
     
  19. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    It kind of depends on where the air is that you're trying to bleed out. If you are sure everything is good except maybe the line to a wheel where you had a caliper off, this kind of approach might be enough.

    If there is any chance of bubbles being in the underhood hardware, the bleed procedure controlled by the ECU commanded by a scan tool is the only way, because there are multiple passages in there that depend on which way the valves go, so some of those passages you are not even bleeding at all unless the ECU switches the valves for you.
     
  20. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    With the old pad in place, you'll only need ONE clamp, in the center of the pad.

     
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