1. The site is migrating to a new server this week, so there will likely be some downtime during that process. You can follow along here for updates.

High Voltage Battery Blower Modification - "Plug and Play" module

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Accessories & Modifications' started by FirstFlight, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    I received my scangauge II a few weeks ago because I had a fault light that needed to be diagnosed. I was always curious about the temperature of the high voltage battery and the temps are higher than what I anticipated. Even after the Prius is parked, not only will the temperature rise in certain situations, it takes forever to cool down. Even after sitting overnight, the battery temperature can still be high.

    This led me to install the battery blower modification and it works great. Wiring up the relay isn't hard but it was tedious and I was looking for a cleaner installation. I have a production run of 200 PCB's that were never used (never enter into a verbal contract:mad:) so I reworked it to install the battery blower modification. The PCB I'm using incorporates a microcontroller so I decided to also use a timer after the Prius is powered down. This allows the battery to continue to cool after I've left the car.

    The only thing the user would need to do is supply power to the board (-12 and +12), run one wire to turn the blower on and cut the green and purple wires. For lazy people or people who like gadgets, the board has a wireless IC as well so you don't even have to run a wire to the front of the car and you can use a remote control to turn it on and off. I can program the board however you would like if there's something special you want.

    Not looking for much, just looking to recoup the cost of the parts and the board. The board size is 4.125" W by 2.575 L. It has screw down terminal blocks on the board and makes the installation easier. I'll throw a one year warranty on the board.
     
    dave77 and Rokeby like this.
  2. Rokeby

    Rokeby Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    3,033
    708
    75
    Location:
    Ballamer, Merlin
    Vehicle:
    2008 Prius
    This mod really sounds interesting. While it's not a necessity...
    anything that coddles the HV battery can't be bad... can it?

    I don't have a clear idea of what your mod entails.
    Is my understanding correct:
    * the OEM fan is used, there is no additional fan,
    * 12V supply is/or should be separate from the onboard 12V battery
    which has an unfortunate history of being easily run down.

    Where exactly is the PCB installed?
    Can you post a picture of the PCB? (Printed Circuit Board?)
     
  3. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Yes, the OEM fan is used.

    You can install the PCB anywhere you want but I put it close to the fan so the wires are shorter. I've thought about using an additional battery and using a diode (or relay) to isolate the power supply for the fan when the car is off. I haven't tested how much the current consumption from the fan (4.2 amps I think) affects the longevity of the battery or the day-to-day use. I don't think that leaving the fan on for five minutes or so would be a huge issue but I'm sure many people on here have done extensive testing on the battery and could provide some helpful comments.

    When I get home tonight I'll take some pics and post them.
     
    dave77 likes this.
  4. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Here is a pic of the board. The connections that needed to be made to the board are:

    Green OEM fan
    Violet OEM fan
    Green CPU
    Violet CPU
    +12 VDC
    -12 VDC
    Momentary button wire

    Installation is a piece of cake. The hardest part will be running the momentary button wire to the front, which is relatively easy. I've found that when using the fan as the battery temperature approaches 95 degrees, it doesn't go higher and the temps I've seen in the 120's doesn't happen anymore.

    I also have an output on the board that controls an LED. I use this as a feedback to tell me if the fan is on or off and if the timer is activated.

    The program looks like this (fan is starting in the off position):

    Button pressed and released in less than two seconds
    Fan is turned on (15 minute max in the event you forgot to shut it off)
    LED is steady on

    Button pressed and released in less than two seconds
    Fan is turned off and reverts to OEM control (forever)
    LED is off

    Button pressed and held for for more than two seconds
    Fan turns on and runs for X minutes
    Led blinks at one second intervals
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Flying White Dutchman

    Flying White Dutchman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    4,374
    312
    0
    Vehicle:
    Other Non-Hybrid
    Model:
    N/A
    What high temp where you seeing?
    Dus uit also see the prius will have more regen into the Pack when ita hotter.
    Operation temp is not that low

    -Htc Tapatalk
     
  6. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Speaking from memory here but these numbers are close. Anything below 85 degrees Fahrenheit and anything above 105 degrees Fahrenheit will result is reduced regen. I live in a hilly area and getting the pack to 105 on a 80 degree day isn't difficult to do at all.
     
  7. Flying White Dutchman

    Flying White Dutchman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    4,374
    312
    0
    Vehicle:
    Other Non-Hybrid
    Model:
    N/A
    Ok thats wy

    -Htc Tapatalk
     
  8. pjc

    pjc Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2012
    139
    46
    0
    Location:
    Bloomington, MN
    Vehicle:
    2009 Prius
    FirstFlight,

    I wish you'd posted this a month ago! I just did the standard (EAA) version of the mod with a simple toggle switch up front. The mod does work great; my only complaint is the noise the thing makes. One of the nice things about the Prius (esp with PHEV) is how quiet it is -- then you have that squirrel cage fan roaring away in the back seat!

    What I'd really like is a variable speed knob.... Can that be worked into your board?

    It's amazing how long the battery holds heat, isn't it? I've noticed as well the phenomenon of the battery actually getter hotter after it's been off awhile (even if the car isn't out in the sun).

    It's too bad the ECU doesn't do more to control the battery temp. It's a bit mystifying to me. I once had the battery get so hot the CCL went down to 12A! (That's when I got my act together and finally did the mod.) You would think that the reduction in CCL would be a significant efficiency hit even in a stock Prius.... I guess as long as it is enough to capture most of the regen, they don't worry about it. This mod should be standard procedure for PHEV conversions (I guess it is except for Enginer kits).
     
  9. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Yes, I was trying that out last weekend. To do it with hardware isn't that difficult but to do it with software may be tricky. That was one of the things I was going to look into next weekend.

    I've seen my CCL down very low as well. The other thing to consider when the traction battery gets warm is:

    1. Heat reduces the life of a battery.

    2. When the heat is increased in the battery, you recoup less energy and that's a waste!

    3. I didn't realize the answer to this thought until I received my scangauge. Sometimes I "felt" like my car wasn't stopping as good as it should. I thought it was all in my head. Then when I received my scangauge I was able to see that my Prius was just letting the energy turn into heat by way of the brake pads! Not only does the comment in point #2 come into play but you're also shortening the life of the brake pads, rotors and drums as well. Granted, it's not significant but it's still money wasted.
     
  10. Flying White Dutchman

    Flying White Dutchman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    4,374
    312
    0
    Vehicle:
    Other Non-Hybrid
    Model:
    N/A
    did you check you HV oem fan? maybe its also stuck with durt?
    and therefor can not cool it good
    also do you run the A/C or just a open window? the cool air it taking from the inside of the car but when its alread hot inside it wil not cool a lot.
     
  11. pjc

    pjc Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2012
    139
    46
    0
    Location:
    Bloomington, MN
    Vehicle:
    2009 Prius
    No, I think it is working as expected. The time my CCL went way down, I was not using A/C because it wasn't that hot out, but I had been doing a lot of EV driving (I have a PHEV conversion). I think that was the main factor, which is why I said it should be standard procedure for PHEV conversions.

    That's not a bad idea to check the vents, though, since it was a salvage vehicle....
     
  12. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Checking the fan for obstructions/debris and if the fan was working properly is the first thing I did. I know you keep thinking the problem is everything else except the design of the fan or software to control it but I can tell you from experience that in my car it is the root cause of the heat buildup.

    My proof is the fact that I can run at a steady speed on the highway (windows open or closed with A/C on) and my battery temp rarely gets above 95. When it's hot and I'm going up and down hills or stop and go traffic the battery temp rises without fail, sometimes into the 120's. Since I've installed the modification, I haven't seen a temp over 98.6 degrees.
     
  13. jdcollins5

    jdcollins5 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    5,131
    1,333
    0
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    Vehicle:
    2010 Prius
    Model:
    III
    FirstFlight,

    Are you connecting the 12V directly to the fan flower motor? The reason that I ask is that I used Adrian Black's parameters to force the blower motor fan through its 6 modes and recorded the following data:

    BFM = 1, CF0 = 34% and VMF = 1.3V
    BFM = 2, CF0 = 41% and VMF = 2.0V
    BFM = 3, CF0 = 48% and VMF = 2.5V
    BFM = 4, CF0 = 55% and VMF = 3.0V
    BFM = 5, CF0 = 63% and VMF = 3.5V
    BFM = 6, CF0 = 72% and VMF = 4.0V

    I checked with the Repair Manual and it shows the VMF for Mode 1 to be between 1.0 and 1.4V. Since the recorded Mode 1 VMF was 1.3V the values seem to agree with the Repair Manual. The top VMF or fan motor voltage was listed as 4.0V.

    I am not sure what the values would be for the Gen II though but think they would be similar.

    Dwight

    Read more: http://priuschat.com/threads/scangaugeii-work-on-2010.64406/page-25#ixzz1wxsvknVq
     
    Redpoint5 likes this.
  14. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Thanks for the information. Did you use a potentiometer or something like that to vary the voltage? I haven't had that much time to play with it but when I get some free time this weekend I will definitely see if I can make it work in a variable speed mode.
     
  15. jdcollins5

    jdcollins5 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    5,131
    1,333
    0
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    Vehicle:
    2010 Prius
    Model:
    III
    No, I used the ScanGauge and Adrian Black's XGauge configurations to request the different Battery Fan Modes 1-6 and then monitored the other parameters including the VMF which is the Voltage Motor Fan or the battery fan motor voltage.

    The XGauges can be found in his spreadsheet for the Gen III. I am not sure if the same XGauges are available for the Gen II.
     
  16. FirstFlight

    FirstFlight Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    429
    77
    0
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Ah, I see. From what I understand, you can only monitor these signals on a Gen II, whereas you can control and monitor on a Gen III.
     
    dave77 and jdcollins5 like this.
  17. Flying White Dutchman

    Flying White Dutchman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    4,374
    312
    0
    Vehicle:
    Other Non-Hybrid
    Model:
    N/A
    Phev enginer?

    -Htc Tapatalk
     
  18. ve6oz

    ve6oz New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    4
    0
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    II
     
  19. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

    Joined:
    May 11, 2005
    105,178
    47,733
    0
    Location:
    boston
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius Plug-in
    Model:
    Plug-in Base
    that's exactly the point.
     
  20. ve6oz

    ve6oz New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    4
    0
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    II
    Is this module still available? Let me know your price and how do you control it from the front with and without wireless. Thanks
     
Loading...