I have a 2012 Toyota Prius C two with 95,000 miles. Soon I will need a 100,000-mile maintenance. Any

Discussion in 'Prius c Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by tgpii, Nov 25, 2018.

  1. tgpii

    tgpii Member

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    I have a 2012 Toyota Prius C two with 95,000 miles. Soon I will need a 100,000-mile maintenance. Any suggestions on what maintenance to get? Other then what the manual says? I was thinking of an engine tune-up, replace brake pads, trans flush, have the whole car inspected. Anything else? I did change the tires around 65,000 miles. If there are already forums or post on this please direct me. Thank you!
     
  2. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    All I can think: the service writers will be fighting over you, lol.

    There's some items not in the bood that are worth doing. I would consider them one-at-a-time, it's not imperative to do it all at once, and seriously consider DIY, if at all possible.

    Some ideas:

    1. Brake fluid change.
    2. Brake inspection. Have you ever had this? Not just the quick glance over when they're rotating the tires, the more in-depth inspection, involving partial disassemble, inspection/cleaning and relube? The US schedule is tri-yearly or 30K miles for this IIRC. Your pads/shoes (rear drums) maybe be fine, but periodical inspection and relube is recommended by Toyota.
    3. Transaxle fluid change. Yes, but consider DIY. If dealership does it, it should NOT be more than $100. It is a very simple and straightforward fluid change. If they try to tell you elsewise they are either lying or clueless, or both. Stick with Toyota ATF WS, for sure.
    4. Throttle body cleaning. Relatively easy DIY, for sure watch @NutzAboutBolts video, pinned at top of 3rd gen maintenance forum on this. I'd think the c is pretty much the same, removal for access might be a little different.
     
  3. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    ^^^good advice^^^
    no such thing as a 'tune up' anymore. are you following the owners maintenance guide that came with the car?
    don't listen to the dealer
     
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  4. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Skip the brake pads unless the 95K miles was entirely stop and go driving... The braking system primarily runs on resistance used to recharge the batteries and friction from brake pads is only used in hard emergency braking and speeds below 6mph. Inspecting the hybrid battery pack bus bars and wiring harness for corrosion would be wise. Di-electric grease will prevent corrosion in the future. Also battery reconditioning could be wise since Prius C used a lower power hybrid battery pack than regular Prius: FAQ
    And most important cleaning EGR valve system, maybe even get an oil catch can. There's lots of info on here about that.
     
  5. ztanos

    ztanos All-around Geek!

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    My dealer flat refused to do the ATF swap, but when I pushed, they stated it would be $225.
     
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  6. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    I would not follow the above advice.
     
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  7. sam spade 2

    sam spade 2 Senior Member

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    In addition to what the manual says......or instead of that.......I recommend trading it in while it still has some value and before it starts needing any major work.

    If that is not possible, then do what the manual says and don't worry about it.
    Do not fall for any "recommended extra's" from the shop.
     
  8. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    Brake fluid change and transaxle fluid change are worthwhile services imho, both are ignored by Toyota USA. It's tough, separating the wheat from the chaff.

    This is maddening. I do the ATF drain-and-fill in about the same time as an oil change, in a DIY environment, with floor jack and safety stands. With a dealership having a full lift that quickly raises the car and keeps it level, it's absurdly simple/easy. Should be around $80.

    They're either uninformed or larcenous, or maybe both.
     
  9. sam spade 2

    sam spade 2 Senior Member

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    I was about to send back a curt reply to that until.........I realized that that you did NOT say "at" about the same time.

    Unless you are in a really harsh environment OR drive it really hard, some of that stuff really is perfectly fine for as long as the car lasts.

    But I gotta admit that IF I was going to keep one past 100K miles, I would be a little nervous about some of those "lifetime" fluids.
     
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  10. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Clearly replacing brake pads depends on a visual inspection... I'm at 235K freeway miles and my original pads are getting down there, but still within spec.
     
  11. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    An early tranaxle fluid change is best, judging from the colours I've seen:

    First drain, around one year mark and 15K kms: quite dark
    Second drain, around 40K: somewhat darker, not by much
    Third drain, around 65K: virtually like new, I resolved to stop doing it.

    Regardless of pad thickness, there's caliper pin lube, clean and relube of all points of contact between pads, shims and caliper. Plus inspection of rotor thickness and runout.

    I tend to let the latter slide, in partricular the runout, but once in a while it's worth checking. One reason: it always takes me about 20 minutes to orient my dial indicator's magnetic base correctly, to go back in it's firgging case, lol.

    Toyota US recommends a full inspection tri-yearly or 30K miles IIRC.
     
    #11 Mendel Leisk, Dec 3, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2018
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  12. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Compared to service manuals this is totally irrational and wasteful... Toyota says the ATF is designed to last the life of the vehicle and never needs to be replaced. I replaced mine once to make sure all the particles that wore off in the earliest stages of vehicle break in are no longer circulating around in there, but it's highly irrational, akin to someone with OCD washing their hands 100 times a day to replace the fluid several times or more over the life of the vehicle. The used ATF analysis data that's been posted on here over the years tends to confirm this.
     
  13. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    It's not irrational in the absence of any guidance from Toyota, to do a few changes, to find out for yourself. The scientific method. About $40 a pop if you DIY.

    I'm just trying to share what I saw so others can judge what they need to do, and when.
     
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  14. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    With so many Gen2 Prius still on the road with more than 200K miles and all the Gen3 Prius with bad EGR systems blowing head gaskets before even 150K, selling your Gen2 and upgrading to a newer Prius may well be the most expensive car ownership you'll ever make.

    The myth that cars are only good for 100K miles hasn't been true for decades... Even low quality US cars like Ford Focus are getting 300K miles without issue. Back in the 1950's thru 80's the 100K rule was true, but vehicles are not built like that anymore.
     
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  15. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    There is no absence of guidance from Toyota on this and it's not irrational to change your ATF once or maybe in extreme cases twice when Toyota says it never ever needs to be done. But it IS totally wacked kind of irrational to change it several times or more as if it was as prone to the same challenges as motor oil.
     
  16. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    I'm guilty of what, one too many transaxle fluid changes? And I believe I'd already acknowledged the third change seemed unwarranted, judging from the drained fluid.

    To channel Steve Martin:

    Well excuse me.
     
  17. sam spade 2

    sam spade 2 Senior Member

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    What exactly makes you think that color alone really tells you ANYTHING about the condition of the transmission fluid ??
    Hint: It is highly likely that it tells you NOTHING useful.
     
  18. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    If it's very dark the first time, and near-new looking the second time, that says something to me. I appreciate it could be dark but still just fine, but: for $40 and an hour out of my life, I'm not going to lose any sleep.

    My take is the brake-in period is roughest on the fluid, again, just judging by colour.
     
    #18 Mendel Leisk, Dec 3, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2018
  19. sam spade 2

    sam spade 2 Senior Member

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    Maybe the original fluid had a slightly different formula.
    Just maybe.

    Some premium engine oils turn almost black after only a few hundred miles.
     
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  20. ETC(SS)

    ETC(SS) The OTHER One Percenter.....

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    +1

    The first thing I would do is get a quote....preferably from at least two places that are qualified to work on Priussys.
    I would then do a stare and compare with the maintenance items that the people who actually designed and built the car say will be required at 100,000 miles.

    I would then consider other variables:
    Harsh climate.
    Medium low mileage (14,000/yr) suburbanite.
    Adult driven (65,000 city miles on OEM tires)
    Probably garage kept - unless CFO drives a nicer car.
    Owner probably never checks the oil level more than 1-2 times a year.

    So....
    +1 on the transaxle fluid replacement IF you can find a mechanic that you trust to do the work...and ONLY because you have to actually try to screw it up. Should run about $120

    MAYBE +1 on a brake fluid replacement.
    This is a lot easier to screw up, and it will be a chance for the dealer to doink you for hundreds of dollars for a job that should only take them a half hour and $10 worth of brake fluid, but since the OP insists on living in an inhospitable climate, it's probably warranted.

    Minus 1 on anything containing the words "Throttle Body" or "injector."
    This "service" usually consists of (1) nothing - or the placebo method......(2) Spray and pray - or getting a can of cleaner and spraying it somewhere near the car and praying that more customers opt for this "service" or.....(3) The bottle job, which is putting a bottle of something like Techron in your gas tank.

    The biggest problem that this car is going to face besides road salt and inattentive drivers is oil use.
    Research EGR (do Priussys have one?) and perhaps have them replace the PVC valve.

    If nothing else, it will reveal the honesty factor of the repair person since PCV valves are about a $10 part and take all of about 30 seconds to replace!

    Good Luck!

    RTFM
    (Read The.....uhh...."Factory" Manual!).... :D
     
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