I need help with 01 prius codes p0300 p3006 p3011 p3014 and more

Discussion in 'Generation 1 Prius Discussion' started by rbolivas, Oct 21, 2014.

  1. rbolivas

    rbolivas New Member

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    Anaheim, CA
    Vehicle:
    2001 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    i have a 01 prius aroud 150,ooo miles, about 4 days ago theses warning lights went on the red triangle, engine light, ps, main battery, and car exclamation (
    ) <-- thats a exact example of what my car shows. the car drives almost like im hydroplaing but its not raining, the tires almost skip/jerk when i accelerate and the car switches the between the engine and electric constantly, even at slow speeds. im scared :(, is it still safe to drive untill i get it fixed? if i disconnects the battery in the trunk and reconnect it the messages go away but appear after a few miles.

    i took it to aamco and got these codes
    Engine:
    p0300 - Random/Multiple misfire cylinder detection

    Hybrid Batteries:
    p3006 - Battery SOC are uneven
    p3011 - Batttery block 1 malfuntion
    p3014 - Battery block 4 malfunction


    ABS:
    c1202 - Brake Fluid low, or open circuit in brake fluid level warning switch circuit
    c1259 - malfuntion in regenerative of HV ECU

    EMPS:
    C1521 - Motor circuit malfunction
    C1522 - Motor circuit malfunction


    ....and I don't know what im supposed to do next, i understand brake fluid, duh, but can anyone tell me exactly what i should do next and what my options are? and what do those abbreviations mean? as you probably figured im not good with cars, and any detailed info i really need.

    also would anyone recommend still driving it to and from work every day about 45 minutes each way on streets not freeway.
     
  2. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    I can help with the abbreviations. :)

    The engine code should be pretty self-explanatory. The engine seems to be running a bit rough, but there is no specific cylinder that is constantly misfiring. Things to check ... spark plugs, throttle body cleaning, mass-airflow sensor, that all the rubber tubing is intact, the usual stuff. Probably nothing very expensive here.

    Battery SOC is state-of-charge. Your traction battery is made out of 288 nickel-metal-hydride cells arranged in modules of six cells each (that's 38 modules). Every twelve cells (two modules) there's a wire back to the battery ECU (electronic control unit, we could just say computer) so it can monitor the voltage. So there are these nineteen blocks of two modules each and the computer compares them to make sure they are all at nearly the same state of charge. Two of yours, block 1 and block 4, are no longer matching the others very well, so it's probably about time for some attention to the battery. As Bob Wilson is prone to pointing out, there are various ways you can approach that depending on which two out of {good, fast, cheap} you want to pick. For example, buying a new replacement battery is {good, fast}, a used one is {fast, cheap}, taking yours apart is cheap (and good if you do everything right) and no kind of fast.

    ABS is the antilock braking system. The code that's about the brake fluid level is pretty self-explanatory too. The computer thinks your fluid level might be low. So check the level. If it's low, fill it to the full mark. If it is at the full mark and the computer still thinks it's low, then there's obviously some electrical problem in the fluid level sensor or wiring, probably not really hard to track down but would take some focused attention.

    The C1259 code is the one you really don't have to worry about. The ABS computer will show that code any time the HV (hybrid vehicle) computer has notified it of any problem. Because the HV computer knows there's a battery issue, the brake computer shows C1259. It doesn't indicate any new additional problem, and it can be cleared once the actual trouble is fixed with the battery.

    EMPS is the electric motor power steering. Your Prius can't use a pump and power steering fluid like most cars because you need steering power even when the engine isn't running, so they use an electric motor instead. Both of the codes indicate something wrong in the electrical circuit to the motor. That could be in the EMPS ECU (computer), the wiring to the motor, or in the motor itself; the service manual has steps to help pin down where the problem really is. You'd probably rather have it be in the ECU or wiring, because if it's in the motor (built into the steering gearbox), that's an expensive part.

    As for what you should do next and what your options are ... if you're not good with cars but you're game to learn, the service manuals will be a really good start. You can buy them on paper (sold through helminc.com) or just view them online at techinfo.toyota.com. If you were really good with cars already you might try to go by the seat of your pants, but if you have to learn how to work on the car you'll just slow yourself down if you try without the real manuals. You'll also want something you can use to read the Prius codes yourself, and there are good, inexpensive options talked about all over this forum.

    If you're not interested in turning a wrench yourself, you might want to consider selling this to someone who likes to work on Gen 1 Prii, just because you've got enough issues here that if all you can do is pay somebody else to work on them, they'll run into some money.

    Hope this helps,
    -Chap
     
  3. Gen1newbie

    Gen1newbie Junior Member

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    Vehicle:
    2002 Prius
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    Rbolivas,
    I could be of some help to you, as I just did the HV Battery in my 01 Prius. And I just happen to have some good Gen 1 cells, if you just want to repair your bad banks, sounds like you only need four batteries in total, to get you going again. Its not to difficult to take the HV battery out, but it does take a few hours to rebuild, and get it back in. What ever you do, dont touch anything!!! before you pull the big orange safety plug out of the Battery pack. you can find it on the lower left side of the Battery pack, looking at it from the trunk. That will disable the High Voltage battery. You will need to remove all the nice cloth like covers, from the trunk, and also the back seat needs to come out to unbolt everything. I hope you have a garage to work in.
    Dave
    PS Gen 1 battery cells up on eBay right now ;)
     
  4. rbolivas

    rbolivas New Member

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    Vehicle:
    2001 Prius
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    N/A
    / THIS IS AN UPDATE PLEASE REPLY

    Hello I drive a 01 prius the check engine, exclamation and battery lights shoe up on dash and touch screen, had the cell hv battery cells replaced, and car still has same problems I replaced the aux battery in the truck but didn't replace the wires connecting it . Was that something I was supposed to do? My car will run fine, the dash and touch screen will light up then the brake light comes on and acceleration drags, if I pull over turn engine on and off the brake light goes away but not the battery and engine lights, also my turtle light comes on time to time. Is this because I didn't replace the coupling in the trunk battery? I already replaced the cells in the hv battery, PLEASE HELP
     
  5. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    No, it's not about the small battery in the trunk, it's about the HV battery. You say you "already replaced the cells" but we'll need more details about exactly what you did or didn't do, because there is still a(t least one) problem with that battery. Also, in your first posting last October, you posted the trouble codes read from the car. Now, after some work has been done and some things were changed, it is important to do that again. You could go back to AAMCO as they seemed to successfully read them before, or you could buy a Mini VCI for yourself and read the codes. That might be useful to you, as you might be doing additional work to get your car problems resolved.

    Cheers,
    -Chap
     
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