Nuvi/Tom Tom, etc. vs. Prius Nav

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Audio and Electronics' started by PriusRos, Oct 12, 2009.

  1. PriusRos

    PriusRos A Fairly Senior Member - 2016 Prius Owner

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    Isn't the traffic on the Garmin only if you have a paid subscription? I have a 760 and previously a 660; they were both paid subscriptions for traffic after the trial period expired.

    I've been able to download contacts to the Garmin from a couple of different phones with no problem.

    Yes, but I blame my own pronunciation :D! I agree it does get frustrating, especially when sometimes it just gives up and makes you start over.
     
  2. warrior

    warrior New Member

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    The Garmin C-530 works just fine for me.:)
     
  3. LoraJ

    LoraJ Active Member

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    We had the Garmin Nuvi 360 which we now use just for when we travel. What I like about it over the Toyota NAV is I find the maps easier to read. Also, we got lifetime map updates for a third of the cost that it would be to get a new DVD for the Toyota.

    What I like better about the Toyota NAV:
    Larger display
    The Dual screen
    I like the hint in the upper right corner about what way my next turn will be so I can prepare with plenty of time.
    It recalculates faster than the Garmin, and doesn't yell at us about it. Just dings.
    There are times where it takes our Garmin forever to find a Satellite. The NAV has always been ready to go.
     
  4. hobbit

    hobbit Senior Member

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    Before y'all go GPS shopping for the holidays or whatever, if
    you're thinking about the Nuvi line you should read this.
    .
    _H*
     
  5. cwerdna

    cwerdna Senior Member

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    I posted some pros and cons of my 06 Prius' nav system vs my Garmin Nuvi 350 for my other (nav-less) car at http://priuschat.com/forums/gen-ii-...dvd-nav-vs-other-nav-system-2.html#post675023.

    I haven't had a chance to thoroughly read Hobbit's criticisms of his Nuvi 500 but I find my Nuvi 350 more than adequate for my needs: to guide me to my destination. Sure, some POIs are missing but my unit is a few years old now and hasn't been updated. I agree that features like an MP3 player and picture viewer are superfluous. I don't use them on my Nuvi 350 and mine doesn't have Bluetooth (had to go for the 360 or 370 to get it).

    FWIW, I'll be receiving a free Nuvi 1200 from my bank soon. I anticipate it'll happily (to me) replace my Nuvi 350.

    My previous GPS unit: a Magellan Map 330 had no turn by turn directions (I could see my heading/bearing and distance from my destination and I could upload street level maps into its 8 megs of user addressable flash). PNDs back then were huge, expensive and didn't even include maps for entire US.
     
  6. brianric

    brianric Junior Member

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    Problem with the nuvi is Garmin dumbed them down compared to their Street Pilot series, which Garmin just about abandoned. After years of being a Garmin owner, went to a TomTom 740 Live. It's not perfect, as screen tends to wash out in direct sunlight, but it is easily customizable, gives alternate routes, superior detour function, and Google Live.
     
  7. jfschultz

    jfschultz Active Member

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    I had gotten a 2004 Prius with navigation. Due to data issues there was a free update to the 2005 DVD. A quick check of the DVD indicated that the navigation data was already 2 years old!

    After encountering more and more problems with 6 year old data, I finally updated with a TomTom Go 630, for a bit less than the price of the Toyota DVD on sale. Now 4 quarterly updates will cost less than $50 a year.

    One big issue I had with the Toyota (and have not yet checked out on the TomTom) is using the US highway than runs next to the Interstate. For example from Memphis, TN to Jackson, MS, we would like to use US-51 instead of I-55. It has less traffic and the 10 MPH speed limit difference bumps the mileage nearly 10 MPG! The Toyota system would either keep trying to put us on I-55, or use US-61, miles away, as an alternate.

    Also the Go 630 has many features (some optional) that do not exist on the Toyota navigation system.
     
  8. Ophbalance

    Ophbalance Member

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    I use TomTom 7 on my HTC Touch. At the very lesat, IT can find my @#$#@!$ house. The NAVI get's lost as soon as I turn off the interstate. It can see the road, but cannot offer turn by turn instructions. Like others, I find it odd that a TomTom 2 gig map set can figure this out, where the NAVI with a 9.4 gig DVD cannot. The only thing I miss on the TomTom software is that nifty split screen lane deal... where the map is still displayed on the left, but the upcoming turn is shown on the right (including the amount of lanes in the road). That would be really bloody useful tooling through the DC area on our way to PA. The TomTom dedicated hardware can do it, but the PPC version never will. I wonder if the iPhone got this ability though?
     
  9. hobbit

    hobbit Senior Member

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    I wound up taking the Nuvi 500 POS back. Have a TomTom ONE 140s
    now, actually I have the second one of them as the first one
    had a thermal-related video problem that faded the screen pretty
    severely when the unit was mildly cold. It doesn't do breadcrumb
    or topo or elevation, but the UI makes a bit more sense overall
    and makes no particular pretenses at being the pinnacle state of
    the art. It isn't, and TomTom knows that. The one almost-
    showstopping bug is the auto-zoom, where the normal running
    map-view gets zoomed to what TomTom arrogantly thinks the level
    you want is and although it allows zooming in or out from there,
    reverts to its own idea after a short timeout.
    .
    TomTom support offers the dubious argument that such behavior
    is MANDATED in some obscure country they happen to sell their
    product into, as a safety feature. While this tickles my BS
    meter pretty severely I could almost see some misguided government
    bureaucrat thinking he knows more about technology than everybody
    else and pushing something that ridiculous into law or standards
    or whatever. The support rep had no idea where to point me to
    substantiate this, and I did a bunch of fruitless searching.
    .
    If anything it's less safe, forcing the user to continually poke
    the (-) button to see a larger radius at highway speeds where
    the auto-zoom is *much* too tight to see what's coming up. A
    workaround is to go to map-browse mode around the current location,
    zoom where you want, and occasionally just slide the map to keep
    up with where you are. Still extra screen-touches but at least
    it doesn't run away from you by itself.
    .
    Nobody makes the perfect GPS, far from it. The perfect GPS would
    be my old Quest with the addition of modern amounts of memory,
    topo database, and one-way street indication. Everything else
    should be left strictly alone, and I'll take a batch of real
    physical buttons to control the thing, please. And I'd rather not
    have to depend on a live internet connection to have my database
    at hand in the first place.
    .
    Clearly, another industry in decline from its former glory.
    .
    _H*
     
  10. yadax3

    yadax3 Member

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    We have the NAV system in our Prius as well as the Garmin Nuvi 660 and until I read this thread I had no idea the Garmin had Bluetooth capability. Since it doesn't sound like it works very well I probably won't bother with it now though. (As an aside, the Bluetooth in my Prius is awesome!)

    Anyway, I agree with just about everything I've read here, except I'm not sure I understand Tim's post. :confused:

    Both systems have their pros and cons but the Garmin more user-friendly, more accurate and a much bigger bang for your buck. I'm not too concerned about it being a projectile in a crash because, I'm sorry to say, at any given time there's usually at least one other thing in my car that would qualify. Gads, my purse could probably kill someone if airborne. I also set my Garmin down on the floor below the console when it’s not in use to keep it from being a target for thieves. Even if I had purchased the car first, I'd still want the portability of my Garmin.

    Finally, it may not be the most important feature of my Garmin but I just love the Aussie guy's voice. ;)
     
  11. Croft

    Croft New Member

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    This is only based on the 24hr Prius T Spirit demo car I had.

    Toyota:

    Pros

    • Turn by turn directions in the HUD (by FAR the best feature)
    • Large screen
    • Dual format
    • Voice control
    • TMC

    Cons

    • Information such as ETA, distance to next junction etc far to small to read and have to look down to do so
    • Confusing and difficult to use UI
    • 3D view zoomed out way to far at junctions, when other systems have autozoom.

    My regular SatNav is a TomTom 720

    Pros

    • Intuitive UI
    • Easy to read
    • Screen in drivers direct view
    • Both TMC (free) and LiveUpdate (with subscription) available
    • Manufacturer supported Safety Camera warnings
    • TomTom Home, which makes it extremely easy to connect to a PC and download the very latest updates.
    • Voice address input
    • Portable, can use it on foot etc as well
    • maps available all over the world when on holiday

    Cons

    • Using suction cup, often falls off screen!
    • Software can occasionally be a little flaky (requiring a hardware reset)
    • Theft magnet
     
  12. radioprius1

    radioprius1 Climate Conspirisist

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    Have you (or anyone) tried using a friction mount and putting it on the flat part of the dash by the A-pillar? It looks like a pretty nice place, not sure how well the GPS can acquire satellites there though.
     
  13. PriusRos

    PriusRos A Fairly Senior Member - 2016 Prius Owner

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    I have my Garmin on a beanbag friction mount and place it on the left side of the dash. I am left handed and can easily reach it there when I need it. It's in my line of sight. With the mount, I don't have to deal with sticking and unsticking a suction cup. When I leave the car, I just put the whole thing out of sight or in the center console (this was easier on the 06 because the console had a lot more room).
     
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