Re: 2018 Prius 1 or 2, on the highway, how is overall comfort and noise?

Discussion in 'Gen 4 Prius Main Forum' started by KAKRA, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. KAKRA

    KAKRA New Member

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    Hi. New member here. I'm looking for a new 2018 Prius 1 or 2 for my son. May even hold out for the 2019. It looks like he favors the Prius over the Honda Civic Sport because of the gas mileage. I have little experience with smaller cars. I've read reviews that the latest Prius 1.8L engine is "buzzy" at typical highway speeds. I've also read that the latest model has improved a lot regarding the effects of wind at higher speeds, especially how the car now holds a line better.
    My son will do a lot of traveling on highways the next year or two. I'd like to know what you think of the overall comfort and ride this car gives? At 70-75 mph, windows up, is there a lot of engine/wind noise inside or is it reasonable? I appreciate any experience shared.
     
  2. alanclarkeau

    alanclarkeau Senior Member

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    Welcome to PriusChat.

    Sounds like you need to go drive one - I find it's great, good mileage, good around town or on the highway. It's quieter than my previous small FORD - but if you're comparing it with, say a Jaguar - it's noisier.
     
  3. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    welcome!

    agree on the test drive^^^ (your son, not you) and make it a long highway one.

    prius is not a great highway car for some people, and likely not as quiet and smooth as a new civic.

    also, the drivers seat can be problematic for some, but a younger person with a strong back may not have issues.

    all the best!(y)
     
  4. Gas Mizer

    Gas Mizer Member

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    I use mine for commuting on I-5. Doing 80 mph I get 45 mpg. As far as comfort... It's no Benz but it's light years better than my Sti.
     
  5. KAKRA

    KAKRA New Member

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    test.
    Thanks for the reply. I've been cramming, trying to read everything about the 2018 Prius and didn't read anything about the driver's seat being a problem. How might it be a problem? My son is about 6' 2" and 200 lb, 22 years old.
     
  6. KAKRA

    KAKRA New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. Not to change the main subject, but why "only" 45 mpg if the ratings say 50 on the highway? Different year?
    I've been reading about regenerative braking and realize city stop and go driving will increase mileage. When on the highway, does coasting whenever possible increase the mileage? Does the regenerative braking system on the Prius only work if the brake pedal is used?
     
  7. dbf

    dbf Member

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    I find my 2018 Prius Two very quiet, smooth, and economical on the freeway cruising at 65 to 70 MPH. I typically get around the low 50s MPG range at that speed in the winter and upper 50s when the outside climate is warm enough to not need the heater. More than 70 MPH, I have no significant experience to help you with that!
     
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  8. alanclarkeau

    alanclarkeau Senior Member

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    Gas Mizer said he was doing 80MPH - which isn't what the official MPG assessments are based on. Speed makes a difference to any car. Speed limits near where I live are 62.5MPH - and I do about 60% motorway, 40% urban, and my average is about 57US MPG - but on a longer run, I'll get in the 60-65US MPG range - but sticking to the 62.5 MPH. [the police are stupidly savage here - even a couple over will cost $100s]

    A Bugatti Veyron will empty it's fuel tank in 12 minutes at TOP Speed - but it's official rating is almost 10MPG.

    With the seat - I'm relatively happy with it - there is no perfect seat which will suit 100% of drivers, there are some better but more in prestige cars. Best idea, as with any car, is for him to check he can get comfortable.
     
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  9. Since2002

    Since2002 Senior Lurker

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    I wonder at what speed it switches from MPG to GPM :eek:
     
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  10. alanclarkeau

    alanclarkeau Senior Member

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    Don't think it goes quite fast enough. I forgot there's a new model - the CHIRON - and it'll empty it in 9 mins according to Top Gear. I think it's 2.6 MPG was my rough mental arithmetic - almost gallons per mile.

    I'm almost £1.9m short to pay the £1.9m price-tag.
     
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  11. KAKRA

    KAKRA New Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I appreciate them.
    Yes, going 80 on the highway would decrease your mpg's. I'm not sure what speed is driven when they come up with the highway numbers. Back in the 70's with the gas shortages, the EPA tested cars at 55 mph. Maybe it's about 65 mph now?? More like the real world?
    With what I've been reading about gas mileage and regenerative braking, I find it's interesting that some of you get higher mpg on longer highway trips? That's the norm for non-hybrid cars but how do you achieve higher highway mileage when the brakes aren't used much? From what I understand, frequent braking, as in city driving, recharges the battery and minimizes how much is needed from the gas engine. On the highway, it figures you'll be using the gas engine much more. That explains the typical higher city mpg compared to highway mpg.
     
  12. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    some people develop back and leg pain on longer trips. i can't give you numbers but there are threads and posts here. it's hard to test drive long enough to know.
    if he is comfortable in most any car, it probably won't be an issue. but i hope he is going to test before buying
     
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  13. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    50mpg is a nominal figure from an epa test, and only to be used when comparing cars.
    YMMV = your mileage may vary.
     
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  14. Leadfoot J. McCoalroller

    Leadfoot J. McCoalroller Senior Member

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    Seating comfort and perceived noise are incredibly subjective. There is absolutely no way to satisfy these without a test drive.

    Regenerative braking begins (very subtly) by just removing your foot from the accelerator pedal. It gets ramped up when you hit the brake pedal. Coasting is incredibly simple- just lift your foot most of the way, but not all the way off the pedal. It's completely organic and takes no thought. If it feels like you're doing it right, you are.

    Toyota did an exceptionally good job of making these cars deliver good MPG when you just get in, buckle up and drive. You can eke out impressive gains beyond the norms by adopting weird driving techniques, but at a certain point you're diverting a lot of attention away from traffic and putting people and property at risk- so there is a limit.

    But just like every other car on the road today- keep it under 60 miles per hour for stellar MPG, expect poor results above 75 and learn to live with the scale in the middle.
     
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  15. Since2002

    Since2002 Senior Lurker

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    It's probably better not to think of regenerative braking as an energy gain, it's really more of a feature that cuts your losses when braking. You put energy in when you accelerate. When you step on the brakes in a regular car you lose all of that energy to friction. However with regenerative braking you can reclaim up to about two-thirds of that energy which goes back into the battery. That's a big part of why hybrids are so energy efficient.

    However that's the glass half full viewpoint, it's also sort of a glass half empty situation as you need to remember the 30% or more that you are losing to friction every time you brake.

    Stop and go driving can be pretty efficient, but a big part of that is that your average speed is much slower, like 35 mph or less and thus greatly reduced wind resistance. A regular car gets the wind resistance benefit also during stop and go driving but that is more than offset by energy lost through braking. Whereas a hybrid loses much less energy from braking, so overall it makes for efficient stop and go driving. When the traffic clears and you speed up to 65 mph wind resistance takes its toll and can in some cases lower your mpg compared to stop and go driving. But the Prius is very efficient even at those speeds so nothing to really worry about there either.

    That's somewhat oversimplified as there are other variables such as engine efficiency at different power levels, driving in hills, etc. but the best approach is to just drive it normally at first, then later start experimenting to find ways that you can make minor adjustments to improve mpg.
     
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  16. Gas Mizer

    Gas Mizer Member

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    Wind resistance. I think the sweet spot for this car is between 45 - 60.
     
  17. bisco

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    city driving can be a real killer. getting this thing moving from zero takes a lot of energy, and there's not enough regeneration to make up the losses
     
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  18. alanclarkeau

    alanclarkeau Senior Member

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    Again, it depends very much on how you drive. I move off the mark reasonably quickly if there is traffic behind, then up to the speed limit more carefully. I'll often have someone in the lane next to me in their truck or whatever make a jack-rabbit start - and they'll be sitting beside me at the next light. And I've used ¼ the fuel they did.
     
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  19. KAKRA

    KAKRA New Member

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    Thanks for the replies. Very interesting stuff.
    Another concern I had was with reliability even though I know Toyota's in general are reliable. With all the extra parts a Prius has, with so much more to go wrong, it's still more reliable than most cars. Hard to figure.
     
  20. KAKRA

    KAKRA New Member

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    So it may be that a higher percentage of Prius owners develop back and leg pain compared to other cars? If I remember some reviews right, you sit pretty low in a Prius? Maybe the extra strain when getting in and out adds up.
    Thanks for the reply.
     
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