Super Fuel Saver

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Fuel Economy' started by gsipos, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. gsipos

    gsipos New Member

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    Anyone every buy and use the Super Fuel Saver with their Prius? Did it help improve gas mileage or is it just fancy marketing?

    On the site http://sigmaautomotive.com/ it states:

    Super Fuel Saver is a magnetic frequency resonator. By way of its Neodymium super conductors it generates the specific resonance frequency that, when installed over the fuel line, will fracture the hydrocarbon chains in the passing fuel. No magnet, no matter how large, can produce the required flux pattern, and yet be versatile & flexible enough in size to fit virtually all installations. Theoretically, when fuel molecules get exposed to the specific resonance created by the Neodymium, combustion becomes more efficient, translation: Fuel is burned more thoroughly while un-burned pollution (in the form of exhaust) is reduced

    Let me know
     
  2. tochatihu

    tochatihu Senior Member

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    Thanks for the smile.
     
  3. seasalsa

    seasalsa Active Member

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    If you buy one of those, let me know I hace some ocean front property in Arizona you might be interested in!
     
  4. engunneer

    engunneer Member

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    At least they named a good magnetic material, but look up Superconductivity and note that when they talk about "low temperatures" they generally mean "temperatures approaching absolute zero"
    I am very wary of produsts like this - especially the $50+ ones.

    Oddly enough, Neodymium can be used to clean exhaust, or at least as a component in an assembly that does so.
     
  5. jayman

    jayman Senior Member

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    Hmmm. I do a lot of industrial programming in the petrochemical field. By "fracture" is that like cracking or like reforming? So by breaking the C-C molecular bonds, we're making .... ethylene?

    If anybody is interested, I have a very large bridge for sale.

    Cheap.
     
  6. altaskier

    altaskier New Member

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    It's complete baloney.

    Rare earth magnetic materials like Neodymium or Samarium make much stronger static magnetic fields than Iron magnets. As pointed out by others, this has nothing to do with superconductivity, and unless you somehow spin the magnets there's going to be no frequency to the magnetic field.

    Ok, so you could go to www.edmundscientific.com and buy a few rare earth permanent magnets (which, as pointed out by others, have nothing to do with superconductivity) for cheap and duct-tape them to your fuel line. So what? You're not going to fracture any molecular bonds from having molecules go past a static magnetic field.

    This advert demonstrates the idea that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing in the hands of marketers. Let's consider the case of a medical magnetic resonance imaging machine (MRI scanner). It uses superconductors to produce a very large static magnetic field. It pumps in radio power at a resonant frequency for a particular atom type in the particular static magnetic field. However, it does no molecular chain breaking (otherwise you'd have the same limitations on ionizing radiation dose that x-ray systems such as CAT scanners have). But hey, it involves magnets...
     
  7. hdrygas

    hdrygas New Member

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    P.T. Barnum was right! God bless him.
     
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