The Toyota Mirai (FCV) Thread

Discussion in 'Fuel Cell Vehicles' started by usbseawolf2000, Dec 9, 2014.

  1. orenji

    orenji Senior Member

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    Average life of most cars is 11.5 years. So 15 years for hydrogen tanks far exceeds the average life for cars on the road today.
     
  2. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    As I said 15 years for the tank is fine, though it may add to the depreciation rate of the car.

    Degradation of the fuel stack will also add to that. For fuel stack durability, the DOE had a target of 10% voltage drop over 5000hrs of operation for 2020. The 5000hrs works out to about 150k miles for most cars. Of the fleet of FCEVs on the road in the US, the average has about 2000hrs, and already have a voltage drop of 10%; 30% is predicted for 5000hrs.

    By 60,000 miles these cars have lost 10% of their power.

    At this point, the more expensive fuel stack will need to be replaced before the fuel tank.

    https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy19osti/73011.pdf
     
  3. orenji

    orenji Senior Member

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    Degradation hits start off high if you want to consider 10% high at 60K miles. But after the first hit is slows down. Tesla is the same. They lose about 10% at 100k miles. Maybe more maybe less. It all depends on how one drives.
     
  4. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    Loss of capacity in a battery reduces range. Aside for maybe short range city BEVs, it isn't going to reduce performance.

    At 60k miles, current FCEVs are seeing a 10% reduction in wattage. This leads to reduced the performance of the motor. The hybrid sized battery can only supply so much buffer. Engines don't see that type of reduction in performance. Those that do have a large level of power loss are mainly do to poor maintenance. Fuel cells are losing over time of use. There isn't much the user can do to slow it down besides parking the car.
     
  5. GasperG

    GasperG Senior Member

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    Rmay635703 and Trollbait like this.
  6. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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