1st gen prius drives but does not park

Discussion in 'Generation 1 Prius Discussion' started by james76, Oct 1, 2014.

  1. ronlewis

    ronlewis Member

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    Don't know about your problem, but I have a sudden urge to go surfing. Do you have a friend for my buddy?
     
  2. FireFighterHill

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    It's in the dash Take the shroud around the dash shroud around the gear lever off and you'll find it.

    SM-N960U ?
     
  3. NSmith

    NSmith New Member

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    THAT'S PROBABLY AUSTIN IN CENTRAL TEXAS.
     
  4. dabard051

    dabard051 Tinkerer-in-Charge

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    <bump> if you search on "33820-47020" you can find a couple of used transmission shifter cables (used) for sale on eBay.
    Prices range from US$60 to $US140 or so; your mileage will vary.
     
  5. mroberds

    mroberds Member

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    Hooray necroposting! My '01 did this earlier this week, and this post helped me fix it.

    When I left my house, the shifter was fine. When I got where I was going, I shifted into Reverse to back in, and the shifter was much easier to move than normal. The car went into reverse and moved, but I was suspicious that I wasn't actually in Park when I stopped. I tried moving the car with one foot hanging out the door, while still sitting in the driver's seat, and yep, no park. I drove it the rest of the day and just used the park brake when I stopped; it worked fine but I was a little bit nervous that it would go back into Park on its own.

    The next day, I worked on it, and @rbdigital 's fix worked for me. I had a piece of windshield washer hose that didn't quite fit, and a piece of clear vinyl tubing that worked pretty well. The vinyl tubing had an OD of about 10.2 mm, an ID of about 7.9 mm, and a wall thickness of about 1.1 mm. The butt end of a 5/16" drill bit fits snugly into the ID, so I'm pretty sure that's the nominal ID of the tubing.

    What worked for me was to have quite a length of tubing, so I could use the "extra" tubing as a handle. I pushed the tubing through the ring in the end of the shifter cable from the outboard side (the side furthest from the steering column), until just a couple of mm of it poked out of the inboard side.* I then pushed the ring and tubing together over the end of the peg, just enough to get it started. Then, I used a pair of Channellock-type pliers (aka water pump pliers), with one jaw on the cast piece that the peg is on, and the other jaw on the ring, to force the ring to seat all the way down over the peg. I worked the shifter a few times and was happy with it, so I used a knife to cut off the extra length of tubing.

    (* I first tried poking it through much further, until about 10 mm of it stuck out, but then I found that the extra length tends to "balloon" up when you try to seat the ring on the peg, and you can't get it seated all the way on.)

    Some notes:

    If this happens when you're out on the road, all you really need is a Phillips screwdriver. Stop the car and put the park brake on. Kneel next to the car with the driver's door open and remove the one screw you can see on the bottom of the "pod" in front (FRONT) of the steering wheel. Then, sit in the driver's seat and turn the steering wheel one way until you see one of the two screws in front the steering wheel. Take that screw out, then turn the wheel the other way to expose the other screw, and take it out. You can then take the bottom half of the "pod" off.

    You will most likely see the ring on the end of the shifter cable floating in space, near the peg on the shifter mechanism that it should fit over. Step on the brake and move the shifter handle to whatever gear makes the peg line up best with the end of the shifter cable. Put the ring over the peg with your fingers, and then put your finger or thumb on the end of the peg so the ring doesn't fall off again. Move the shifter handle to Park and it will push the cable to make the transmission go into Park. You can do the same thing to get it into Drive if you need to go somewhere.

    (The ring actually bolts on to the end of the shifter cable, so there's also a chance that the bushing is fine and the ring is still on the peg, but the bolt came out. For that, you will probably find the bolt either inside the pod or on the floor, and can screw it back in by hand.)

    There are detents in both the shifter handle *and* the transmission. This doesn't really affect anything, but I thought it was interesting. I discovered this by pulling and pushing on the shifter cable when it was not on the peg. I thought I'd just feel a click as it went into or out of Park, and nothing else, but there were a couple of "steps" to it somewhere in the R-N-D range. I couldn't actually get it into Park by pushing on the cable by hand; I had to put the ring over the peg and use the shifter handle to do it. (You can see the detent mechanism for the shifter just below the peg for the cable.)

    The original bushing had a flange on at least one side, and possibly both. I found what was left of the original bushing in the bottom half of the "pod" that comes off of the steering column. It's black and I think it *used* to be rubber - it gives a little bit when I push on it, but it's got that old-dried-up-rubber feeling to it. One of the pieces I have has an L-shaped cross section, so it had a flange on one side; I haven't found any U-shaped pieces (flange both sides) but I can't rule it out.

    The dimensions are in the attached sketch. I wish FreeCAD worked better than it did, but it's fairly painful to use. The headline numbers are that the ID of the ring on the shifter cable is 10.2 mm, the OD of the main part of the peg on the shifter is 8.0 mm, and the "bump" on the end of the peg is 8.4 mm. The "perfect" bushing would have about a 1.1 mm wall thickness.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Kevin baker

    Kevin baker New Member

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    ----USA----
    If you have a harbor freight near you, go inside and buy their rubber grommet assortment box (4.99), one of the large ones will fit on there quite nicely. I've seen people make their own/repack stock motor mounts with some polyurethane that comes in a caulk tube, if you don't mind waiting for curing time and want more of the stock feel
     
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