2007 Prius P3000, P0AFA, P0AC0

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by Jules71, Jun 23, 2020.

  1. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Recently got my son a 2007 Prius and have had this happen a few times now. All the lights come on the dash; check engine, VSC, brake system warning light, master warning light, and hybrid system warning light. We have an ODBII tool and got the following codes: P3000, P0AFA, P0AC0. When this happens the engine doesn't cut off to run on the hybrid battery, it isn't charging it, and sometimes it's laggy in the acceleration (also cruise control doesn't work). After parking it for a bit, it will usually revert back to normal on its own. Then it happens again, then normal, then happens again. We've done battery tests when the car is back to normal and it says there is more than 80% life expectancy left. Everything looks fine. When it is in this bad state, there are red bars on the battery test. I'll attach a pic. don't have a lot of money to spend playing guessing games of what the problem might be. Can anyone direct me to a few simple things to check to narrow it down? Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

    #1 Jules71, Jun 23, 2020
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 24, 2020
  2. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    We are also now getting P3014.
     
    #2 Jules71, Jun 23, 2020
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 24, 2020
  3. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2012
    5,691
    2,308
    0
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Two
    Hiya... You're getting bad readings from voltage sending harness (wire frame no.2) a $50 part... Beyond that your pack needs reconditioning (3 increasingly deeper discharges & recharge) And if you have any bad modules, they cost $30 or so.

    Let us know if you like to work on cars yourself, which is cheapest way, or if you need to hire someone to help? If you took it to dealership or most mechanics they'd want $2k-$5k to replace everything with new. Not sure how far from Olympia you are but I do this work for friends for $200-$500 depending on what's needed. Buying brand new pack for $1700 is best long term fix for 10+ years.
     
  4. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Thanks for the info. The hybrid battery was replaced in 2017. Seems we shouldn't be having these problems already?
     
  5. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2012
    5,691
    2,308
    0
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Two
    Most common thing that gets confused when people sell/buy a prius is hybrid battery replaced with brand new, or just repaired/refurbished, or the one that hurts the most replace with a refurbished, because sometimes that's someone with not much skill trying to fix it on the cheap, which only last for months and if you're lucky for a year or two.

    In your case I'm willing to bet they rebuilt the pack but didn't replace or clean the corroded bus bars and nuts, as well as voltage sensing harness. It's also possible they didn't recondition your pack and the replacement module didn't match to the same level of degradation. I'll be driving to Eastern Oregon next week to get stock up on Prius parts. First road trip of 2020. So if you're within range of that and need help and are ok with social distant expectations, mask, outdoors, etc....
     
  6. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    We just bought the vehicle last month. They advertised it as having a "new hv battery. When I inquired further about it, the salesman told me it was a Genuine Toyota/OEM part. That was a lie. We based our decision to buy this particular vehicle on that information. Very shady. We also had some other issues come up (bad fuel injector) and told them they needed to fix it and give us a warranty for 12 months to make it right. They did. That was when we still thought we wouldn't be having any battery issues. But now here we are. I did obtain the invoice from Toyota for the battery replacement. That's how I found out it wasn't a genuine Toyota part. The invoice says they found code p0A80 internal failure of HV battery but it doesn't give the part number they replaced it with. I see the core handling fee and it says they replaced the HV battery and filter. That was less than 20k miles ago. I emailed a tech there and he said it was a "warranty repair" so they installed whatever was sent to him. Kind of at a loss as to what to do now.
     
  7. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2012
    5,691
    2,308
    0
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Two
    If they replace the pack, there's a warranty related to that pack that transfers to the new owner. If it's not an OEM pack but a rebuild, they have a legal problem that if you prevent yourself in a way that makes them worry about having to contact their lawyer and all associated cost, they'll probably make you an offer. Do all the serial codes on the 28 modules in the pack match up?
     
  8. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    So, we likely need:

    1. Voltage sensing harness (wire frame #2) - how is this determined (code)?
    2. Bus bars (clean/replace)
    3. Nuts (clean/replace)
    4. Pack reconditioning (3 increasingly deeper discharges & recharge)

    I don't know that we can do it on our own. It's possible, I suppose. How much would this run to have someone else do it? We are in Western WA.

    How do we check the serial codes?
     
  9. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Also, how do we determine if a module is bad? Sorry for all the questions. This is all new to me. We are not terribly far from Olympia.
     
  10. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2012
    5,691
    2,308
    0
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Two
    Hi Jules71,

    There's a series of tests to do on the pack once it's out of the car and on the work bench to determine which modules are bad or about to go bad.

    The bad voltage harness reading is apparent in your first screenshot with your DR Prius App. Those negative numbers in the red aren't possible in real life and are caused by corrosion messing up the signal the battery ECU processes. It's not certain you have bad modules until this is fixed, though some of your error codes say that you do...

    In terms of getting the work done and the car back on the road, what are your logistical needs?

    Do you have more than one vehicle or this your only vehicle?

    In a little over a week I should have a loaner pack back I can put in so you still have use of the car and I can take the time to be super thorough fixing your pack. Or, if you have another vehicle and have basic mechanical skills you could save money doing a drop off and pick up of the pack?

    Let me know in a private message more details?

    In the meantime, Just keep taking screenshots of you error codes before you clear them for future reference and it the temperature readings of the pack get too high or the warning lights don't go away for very long, it's probably wise to not drive the vehicle till its fixed.
     
  11. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Thanks for the reply. I'll send you a PM.
     
  12. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Back from camping. Looks like we're going to attempt to take the hv battery out tomorrow and take a look at it.

    Is it best to just replace the bus bars and nuts rather than cleaning them? I've read people have stripped the protective coating off which caused faster corrosion build up. Are they nickel plated? Think I saw zinc ones as well. There is a pack on Amazon for under $45. Does that seem reasonable? We should have ordered them first.

    Also, we don't have a lot of high quality tools. I think we can rent/borrow tools from AutoZone but not an impact wrench?
     
  13. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Pulled HV battery pack out today and posted pictures to an album.

    https://priuschat.com/media/albums/2007-prius-hv-battery.2482/

    Started out taking pictures of everything, but after a while the pictures and more of a purpose.

    Any commentary would be appreciated as far as clearing up the original codes and getting this Prius back on the road.
     
    SFO likes this.
  14. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Not sure if this will display right with a copy and paste but these were our readings from the load test.

    First column is the initial voltage for each module. The second column is the measured voltage after the load test. Load test was done by connecting each module to a 12v, 55 watt lamp for 2 minutes. The third column is the difference between the first and second measurements.

    I'm not 100% sure if there is anything outside of spec here. I've seen some other people post voltage measurements that have wild fluctuations and relatively large voltage drops after the load test.


    7.55 7.35 0.20
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.56 7.33 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.54 7.31 0.23 x
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.54 7.32 0.22
    7.54 7.3 0.24
    7.55 7.33 0.22
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.53 x 7.31 0.22 x
    7.53 x 7.31 0.22 x
    7.53 x 7.31 0.22 x
    7.54 - 7.32 0.22
    7.54 - 7.31 0.23 x
    7.55 7.33 0.22
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.54 - 7.32 0.22
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.34 0.21
    7.56 7.34 0.22
    7.56 7.34 0.22
    7.57 7.34 0.23
    7.54 - 7.32 0.22
    7.58 7.37 0.21
     
  15. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2016
    3,945
    4,397
    0
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Touring
    Those modules were manufactured April 9th 2012, so it was certainly not a brand new OEM battery. Actually, I just looked at more of the photos and the modules dates are all over the place. 2010, 2011, 2012...a hodge podge of dates. That's not a critical thing, as long as capacities are similar. Merely shows it was not a Toyota replacement.

    I would be willing to say your problem is due to the broken voltage sensing tab, not a module.

    Purchasing a new wire frame #2 is the way to go, as it includes new busbars and sensor tabs. etc.

    The busbars on the side of the battery without voltage sensing are very easy to clean.

    Make sure you inspect the sockets on the ecu for corrosion.

    and please torque all the fasteners to 48 INCH pounds (4 ft pounds)
     
  16. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Thank you for the reply @TMR-JWAP . Also, a shoutout is warranted to @PriusCamper, who has done a phenomenal job patiently walking me through the steps by way of this thread, some text messages, and PMs. This has saved me probably at least a couple grand at this point.

    After I have the car running, I am going to provide a re-cap of the events that led to the fix so that the PriusChat community can learn from it. That being said, after determining that none of the battery modules were 'bad'. I performed a continuity test on the 14 voltage sensing wires from where they attach to the battery modules to the socket where it would plug into the ECU. There was no continuity on the 3rd wire and 6th wire. On the 3rd wire there is now an open connection because the wire terminal is brittle and cracked.

    Yesterday evening, I placed an order with a local dealer for a new wire frame #2 (P/N 82165 - 47040). It'll be ready for pickup on Tuesday next week.

    In the meantime, I will clean the bus bars on the side of the battery without voltage sensing wires and clean the battery fan.

    IMPORTANT:
    "Please torque all the fasteners to 48 INCH pounds (4 ft pounds)"

    Is there a Toyota Spec Sheet we can refer to for posterity so everybody can get this absolutely correct? I have heard 60 Inch Pounds, 24 Inch Pounds, and now 48 inch pounds.
     
  17. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2016
    3,945
    4,397
    0
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Touring
    Is there a Toyota Spec Sheet we can refer to for posterity so everybody can get this absolutely correct? I have heard 60 Inch Pounds, 24 Inch Pounds, and now 48 inch pounds.

    Yes, it is in the repair manual. I've posted it here previously, along with several others. I'll hunt down the sheet and post it in this thread also.


    Torque Value.JPG
     
    Jules71 likes this.
  18. Jules71

    Jules71 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    12
    2
    43
    Location:
    PNW
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    I am happy to report a successful fix. The problem ended up being with the voltage sensing wires on the battery pack. I replaced the wires with a Wire Frame No. 2 (P/N 82165 - 47040), reinstalled the battery pack, and now it's good to go.
    ------------------------

    Recap: Recently bought a used 2007 Prius with about 130,000 miles. The main reason this one was purchased was because it was advertised as having a "New OEM Battery." We paid a premium price over other similar year and mileage Priuses. Actually it was a re-conditioned battery...reconditioned in 2017.

    Not long after purchase, we got intermittent warning lights and codes for P3000, P0AFA, & P0ACA. The next day the car would run fine and so on. One day the warning lights came on and stayed on.

    After several days of coming to the decision to do the work myself, I pulled the HV battery pack out of the car. Tools used were a 1/4" drive cordless impact wrench, 1/4" and a 3/8" drive ratchets, 3" extensions for each; 8, 10, 12, & 14 mm sockets, and a pair of needle nose pliers.

    I followed along closely to a YouTube video titled "How to replace Toyota Prius hybrid battery 2004 -2009", produced and uploaded by Electron Automotive.

    I had no issues getting the battery pack out by following the instructions. I busted a knuckle once loosening a screw on the battery pack mounting brackets.

    Once the battery pack was out, I performed a load test on each of the modules. Before I could do this, I purchased two lead wires with alligator clips on both ends, some electrical tape, and a 55/60 watt H4 halogen lamp. These types of lamps have 3 plugs on the bottom. Clip an alligator clip up to two of the plugs, wrap the clips with some electrical tape, and you have a makeshift load tester.

    First I used a multi-meter to measure the voltage by placing my multi-meter on the + and - end of each module. Be first number in each row of the table below signifies that initial reading.

    Then I took my makeshift load tester and clipped a lead wire to the + side and another to the - side and used a timer to count down 2 minutes. The lamp lights up during the test and sucks some juice out each module. After two minutes, I took the lead wires off, and measured the voltage again with my multi-meter. The second number in each row signifies the voltage measured after putting 55 watt load on the module for 2 minutes. The third number is the difference between the first and second reading. It shows that all modules are at least decent and not depleting at an abnormal rate. Thus, the problem likely wasn't because of the the battery modules.

    Table 1-
    7.55 7.35 0.20
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.56 7.33 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.54 7.31 0.23 x
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.54 7.32 0.22
    7.54 7.3 0.24
    7.55 7.33 0.22
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.53 x 7.31 0.22 x
    7.53 x 7.31 0.22 x
    7.53 x 7.31 0.22 x
    7.54 - 7.32 0.22
    7.54 - 7.31 0.23 x
    7.55 7.33 0.22
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.54 - 7.32 0.22
    7.55 7.32 0.23
    7.55 7.34 0.21
    7.56 7.34 0.22
    7.56 7.34 0.22
    7.57 7.34 0.23
    7.54 - 7.32 0.22
    7.58 7.37 0.21

    Then I tested for continuity by using my multi-meter to check for continuity between the terminal of the small wire on each block of the battery pack. There are 14 wires to check.
    [​IMG]

    You can see some the wires here. I stuck my multi-meter probe on each of these and then found continuity by sticking my other multi-meter probe in the orange plug seen below. At first I didn't know exactly how it worked, but the wires are arranged in order in the orange plug.
    [​IMG]

    Long story short, I was getting continuity in all wires except for # 3 and #6. A close look at #3 showed this break:
    [​IMG]

    So I ordered a Wire Frame #2 from a local dealership and waited over the holiday weekend to have it shipped. In the meantime, I removed all the nuts, took out all the wires, cleaned the nuts and studs on each of the modules.

    So as to not over or under tighten any nuts or screws, I procured a torque wrench from the Autozone Loan-a-Tool program where you don't have to pay for the tool if you bring it back in working order.

    Putting the battery pack back in was almost exactly in reverse order. The hardest part for me was putting the seats back together.

    When I put the orange safety plug back in, I forgot to lastly push it down, so when I re-started the car, there were warning lights. My heart was broken until I figured out what I did wrong. Once I cleared the warning lights and installed the orange safety plug correctly, there have been no issues.
     
    SFO likes this.
  19. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2016
    3,945
    4,397
    0
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Touring
    Nice job! It's always good to hear another success story
     
Loading...