Acceleration 0-40 MPH (0-65 km/h): ECO vs PWR zone

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Fuel Economy' started by mathlal, Apr 26, 2014.

  1. mathlal

    mathlal Junior Member

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    Hey guys !

    I've always been a PWR mode user since we got our Prius back in 2012/09.

    I've tried accelerating in STD mode staying in the ECO zone for the past couple of tanks and seeing a 5 MPG (0.5 l/100km) better fuel economy based on the on-board computer.

    Is this on par with other drivers ?

    I'm definitely crawling out of intersections more and noticed people tailgating me more than before.

    Do we know what is the absolute most efficient way to accelerate from standstill ?

    I heard keeping out of electric mode from standstill is best since this will drain the batteries and call upon the ICE to recharge the batteries quicker which is not the best way to use the ICE.

    Is this still accurate ?

    My all time average over 27 000 miles (45 000 km) is 40 MPG (5.9 l/100km) from 75% city driving.

    Cheers !
     
  2. Easy Rider

    Easy Rider Active Member

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    Yes that experience probably is typical.
    Keeping out of the electric mode as much as possible will yield a MUCH lower improvement.....and will make the tailgating problem even worse.
    You must strike some kind of practical balance between max. efficiency and reasonable safety.
     
  3. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    Sorry, duplicate. Some sort of browser problem.

    Bob Wilson
     
  4. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    • Avoid speeds over 25 mph for the first minute.
    • Avoid heater below 55C engine coolant temperature.
    • Minimize drawing traction battery power during acceleration.
    • Maximum sidewall pressure in tires.
    • Change transaxle oil at least once
      • Better, three times with at least a 5,000 mile or 7,500 km service gap on each.
    Bob Wilson
     
  5. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    I try to keep acceleration so that the HSD display bar is some where around 3/4 full, try to stay out of the "power" zone, where the ECO light goes off. That's not always possible, especially on upgrades. I'll also back off on acceleration as I near my target speed. I stick to posted speed limits unless they're absolutely silly. Also, if there's no one on my tail I'll stay well under the posted limit, if there's a slowdown coming up, and further acceleration would be pointless.

    I'm an opportunist: wherever possible, say if there's a red light ahead, or traffic congestion, my foot is OFF the gas asap. I keep a generous buffer in front, so I can coast up, rather than have to brake, at least for the most part.

    Sometimes consciously back off on the gas to go into stealth mode (electric only), then use gentle gas, keeping to the left of median on the HSD display bar, at lower speeds on flat roads. At least until the state of charge starts dropping seriously. Then I'll back off, purposely pulse the gas to trigger the engine.
     
  6. vskid3

    vskid3 Active Member

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    I think brisk acceleration is the best, provided you won't be stopping or slowing soon after. Then I coast or use a little battery to maintain speed. I try to keep the battery at 5 or 6 bars to keep the ICE from thinking it needs to charge the battery. I can pretty easily average 55-60MPG tanks during the summer with mostly city driving and trips under 10 miles (suburban, not city-city driving with a light every few hundred feet). You don't have to baby the car all the time, just the right times.
     
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  7. mathlal

    mathlal Junior Member

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    I will definitely go back to using PWR mode, I don't see the benefits ($) vs. driving that slowly :sleep:

    Still, the experiment was fun. I remember doing a similar test but to the other extreme last summer, I couldn't get it past 6.5 l/100km (36 MPG) while driving like I stole it ... major kudos to Toyota on this one :)

    Thanks guys !

    p.s. vskid3; This is how I usually drive (get up to speed ASAP and then feather the throttle to coast on EV as much as possible).

    p.p.s. My all time worst tank (calculated manually) was 7.5 l/100km (31 MPG) in the dead of a typical Canadian winter. No complaints here vs. the 15 l/100km (16 MPG) of our old car (Kia SUV).

    Cheers !
     
  8. 70AARCUDA

    70AARCUDA Active Member

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    Q: Why? Toyota claims their WS transmission fluid is "lifetime," and are you advocating putting WS back in, or using some OTHER transmission fluid, and if so, which brand/product?
     
  9. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    If there were a filter, I would recommend changing the filter. But I've sent samples from all but one change and it takes three changes to fully dilute the residual debris left in from manufacture. Thereafter, 'lifetime' makes sense.

    Bob Wilson
     
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  10. 70AARCUDA

    70AARCUDA Active Member

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    Thanks, I was NOT aware that there was no filter mechanism in the transaxle...thus, everything you wrote makes SENSE now.

    Reminds me of the "old" engine 'break-in oil' change(s) rationale of years ago.
     
  11. El Dobro

    El Dobro A Member

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    When you dump the trans fluid, compare what it looks like to the new stuff going back in. It's also one of the easiest transmissions there is to change the fluid. :D
     
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  12. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    Better still, use a clean, DRY, water bottle and collect about cup. Then send me a note and I'll coordinate having the oil tested. We will need the 'service miles.'

    I prepaid for oil testing but the results have been so good, I've still got money on the account. Getting transaxle oil samples tested helps us to model what is going on inside.

    Bob Wilson
     
  13. 70AARCUDA

    70AARCUDA Active Member

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    OK, I'll take you up on that offer...at what milage do you suggest this "initial" flush be done? Sooner or later? We have slightly over 1,000-miles at the moment...~1.5 months.
     
  14. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    I used 5,000 miles as this coincided with the first engine oil change. No one has done a controlled test but based upon my 5,000 mile sample, I'm leaning towards no later than 5,000 miles. In my case, I had the debris particles microscope analyzed and the images showed distinct particles.

    Bob Wilson
     
  15. 70AARCUDA

    70AARCUDA Active Member

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    I'm thinking that:
    A) If those particles were production (sharp-edged) leftovers, then SOONER flushing is better so as to get them out of there immediately.
    B) If they are wear-in (worn-edged) particles, then LATER flushing is better so as to capture them before the lifetime replenishment is done.
     
  16. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    I would have posted the oil analysis in 2009. See if you can find it but I remember the lab tech called them 'manufacturing' debris. Also, there were small bits of silicon sealant. My memory is the viscosity was down ~5% and their recommended threshold is 15%.

    If you get it changed, get a clean, 1 cup sample of the used oil. I have left-over money in the oil analysis account and have no problem having R&G Labs in Tampa FL do a complete analysis. Every time we get a quality analysis done, we all learn something not known before. Send me a PM when you've got it ready and we'll work out the details.

    Bob Wilson
     
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