best way to increase household wi-fi coverage

Discussion in 'Fred's House of Pancakes' started by cyberpriusII, Feb 22, 2019.

  1. cyberpriusII

    cyberpriusII Prodigyplace says I'm Super Kris

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    Two-story dwelling 1800-square feet (900 sq on bottom, 900 atop).

    Wireless d-link router upstairs. It is an 802.11g -- 205GHz -- opps -- as pointed out by 3priusMike -- I meant 2.4GHz---:whistle:

    QCA9377-3 - Qualcomm Developer Network

    Don't know what else to say other than an easy affordable solution to increase wi-fi acess throughout the house -- maybe outside -- would be nice.

    No real security issue. Live in the middle of nowhere Oregon. Nearest neighbor is half-mile away and nearest public road is several hundred yards away and is a seldom traveled single dirt track.
     
    #1 cyberpriusII, Feb 22, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2019
  2. Salamander_King

    Salamander_King Senior Member

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    Others more knowledgable than I will likely to chime in, but I think your 2003 (16years old) 802.11g router is likely the bottleneck. Upgrading the router to a mesh network will give you the widest range that can be easily extendable, but simply upgrading to any of newer 802.11ac router is likely to give you a huge boost on both coverage and speed. I recently upgraded our almost 10 years old 802.11n router with Nighthawk R7000P AC2300 router bought on sale for less than $100. Both range and speed increased tremendously. I have at least 10 devices connected all the time but have no noticeable slowdown or dropoff.

    R7000P | WiFi Routers | Networking | Home | NETGEAR
     
    #2 Salamander_King, Feb 22, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2019
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  3. 3PriusMike

    3PriusMike Prius owner since 2000, Tesla M3 2018

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    802.11g is 2.4 GHz.
    There are others that are 5 GHz. (some newer ones are both frequencies)

    You want something (anything) that is newer than 802.11g, such as 802.11n or 802.11ac, just depending on the price you want to pay.
    You'll have to configure it and then change the settings in your phones, laptops, etc.
     
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  4. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    comcast has these plug in things that extend the range to rooms it doesn't reach
     
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  5. Usle

    Usle Member

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    Who is the service provider(are they a national outfit) and what speed are they offering?
    A list of network repeter choices.
    Top 10 Network Repeaters of 2019 - Best Reviews Guide

    Does your phone offer fast speeds and is your phone plan unlimited?
    Your phone can be a network, and it can combine the phone network and your internenet service providers network, and it's network can be repeted for a larger range, so, what speed do you have to play with, but yes, the signal can be extended.
     
  6. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    If you're just going for maximum range, then use 2.4GHz antenna. Put it in the center of the house and it should cover everything.

    You should get a new router with 802.11n and 802.11ac. The old 802.11g is obsolete

    If you're looking for speeds above 50mbps, you'll need to go to 5GHz antenna. But this will be much shorter range
     
  7. cyberpriusII

    cyberpriusII Prodigyplace says I'm Super Kris

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    1) Have a "dumb phone" (flip Samsung Black Stripe, circa 2006)

    2) Internet provider is a local POTS that entered the digital world a couple of decades ago. The DSL is not robust enough for services such as Netflix...or so I have been told.

    9.29

    Mbps download

    0.60

    Mbps upload


    So, you all have given me things to think about. I actually set up the whole thing a decade or more ago. It has always been fine, but since I had an accident last year, I can't go upstairs in the house where the desktop computer is located and the only spot I can get a signal on my laptop on the downstairs level is in the master bath, which is located almost directly below the router.

    So, any new set-up will have to be done by my husband. He is woefully unhandy with computers, routers and such -- not that I am much better. So, the simple solution, even if it costs a bit more :eek::eek::eek: is the best in this case....
    kris
     
  8. Salamander_King

    Salamander_King Senior Member

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    If you are still on DSL, and all you want is to be able to connect to the internet on the first floor, the simplest solution would be to move your current router to downstairs. Your DSL modem should be able to connect anywhere you have telephone jack. Now if your desktop computer upstares is connected by ethernet cable currently, and do not have wifi capability, then to preserve the desktop connectivity upstairs and extend wifi signal downstairs, you might be able to use wifi extender as suggested in comment #5. However, with DSL and antiquated router, you may not have enough bandwidth to begin with.
     
    #8 Salamander_King, Feb 22, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2019
  9. jzchen

    jzchen Senior Member

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    From the square footage top and bottom floor I guess your house is shaped like a big cube or rectangle. I have our router on the first floor, but on the tallest stand, towards the center (but more towards the back) of the house. Some routers have wall mountable backs and you could try nearer to the ceiling, and as near the center of the house as possible.
     
  10. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    This is probably DSL's only advantage, and is a simple fix.

    To keep the desk top connected;
    • give it wifi, there are usb wifi dongels, and place router as close to it downstairs
    • use a 50ft ethernet cable, but not pretty and potential tripping hazard
    • put in a LAN, there are widgets that let you use electric outlets and the home wiring for the network.
     
  11. qettyz

    qettyz Active Member

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  12. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    If you're getting 10mbps down, you should just use your phone data plan and make it a hotspot
     
  13. Stevewoods

    Stevewoods Senior Member

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    As noted in post #7, I do not think her phone does data.
     
  14. ETC(SS)

    ETC(SS) The OTHER One Percenter.....

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    ....plus she wanted ...’affordable.’
    This, like “speedy” is not the same for everyone.

    I’d move your present access point as described above and see if that moves the needles enough to kick this issue to the right a little.
    My fallback would be a budget priced newer router.

    Telecommunications is changing at warp speed.
    Even in rural Oregon, and spending $300 on some gollywogg router right now may be overkill AND it might introduce some unforeseen problems with your connected devices which will have to learn to talk and listen to the new access point (router.)

    The last time I danced this dance I gave the new router the same SSID and password as the old.
    It made things easier.

    YMMV
     
    #14 ETC(SS), Feb 24, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
  15. Usle

    Usle Member

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    You've got 9, but what is your isp offering, and what speed are you paying for?

    192.168.1.1 in a new browser window will call up your router, the username is usually admin and the password 1234, don't change anything but look around and find how many devices are usng your bandwidth, if the upstairs PC is eating bandwidth, turn it off, alexa uses bandwidth, etc.

    Agree, move the dsl modem closer,

    I pay for 25 m get 18ish but can get 22 if I turn off blink (security camera) and the network printer.
    9 isn't bad, it beats 1.5.

    Your isp can talk you through moving the modem.
     
    #15 Usle, Feb 24, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
  16. Greenteapri

    Greenteapri Active Member

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    Upgrade the husband.

    Move router.

    Upgrade the router.
     
  17. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web i3 and Prime

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    The signal strength goes down by the square of the distance. Have the WiFi router located closest to laptop room.

    A smooth aluminum foil reflector ‘umbrella’ over the WiFi router will provide more signal to the lower floors.

    It the router has a small, stick antenna, try it horizontal both pointing to and 90 degrees to the laptop room.

    Antenna are as much art as science and Google can provide more than you might want to know ... although entertaining reading for me.

    Bob Wilson
     
    #17 bwilson4web, Feb 28, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2019
  18. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    We went with a Google WiFi mesh network...we have three nodes.. Works really well and is easy to set up!
     
  19. Southern Dad

    Southern Dad Active Member

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    I went with a SmartThings Mesh WiFi system with Plume. Excellent coverage all over the house and the out buildings. Perfect handoff between units and it extends my Zigbee and Z Wave networks.
     
  20. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    Not knowing what a mesh network is, I found this; What Is a Mesh Wi-Fi Router, and Do You Need One?
    The main soundbite is that they are easier to set up and use than a router with extenders, but costs more.

    If you only have a few wifi devices in use, with that use regularly isolated to a portion of the house, and other stationary devices, like the desk top or TV, can be plugged into the ethernet, I'd look into powerline networks. These are the systems that use your house's electrical wiring as ethernet wiring. If you need more wifi coverage, you can get powerline nodes that are also wifi spots.
    What is Powerline Ethernet And How Do You Use It? | Digital Trends
    The Best Powerline Networking Adapter: Reviews by Wirecutter | A New York Times Company
     
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