Buying an EV also buys the fast DC charging network

Discussion in 'EV (Electric Vehicle) Discussion' started by bwilson4web, Oct 9, 2020.

  1. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    Source: Comparing electric car charging networks [Video] | EVANNEX Aftermarket Tesla Accessories

    For the true road warrior, however, it’s not just about the range of the vehicle. The availability of DC fast charging stations is also a critical factor. Until recently, there was only one real choice for those who spend a lot of time on the highway. Tesla started building its Supercharger network in 2012, and it has grown to include (at last count) 1,971 Supercharger stations with 17,467 individual chargers around the world.

    Many observers of the EV scene, including Ed Bott, who wrote about fast charging networks in a recent article in ZDNet, consider the Supercharger network “the gold standard” of fast charging, and it’s hard to argue with that description. Tesla’s network covers the US and Canada like a rug, and reaches deep into Mexico. Coverage is similarly comprehensive in Western Europe and the more affluent regions of Asia. Most Superchargers are in highway locations, but Tesla is starting to add more in urban locations as well.
    . . .
    The Electrify America network is on a mission to build a comprehensive fast charging network across the US. It currently operates 461 charging stations with over 1,580 individual chargers, and is adding more at a rapid clip. The network recently completed its second cross-country route, and it also has comprehensive corridors covering both coasts, the Florida-Chicago axis, and more. Many EA chargers are capable of 350 kW charging (at the moment, the Porsche Taycan is the only EV that can handle this power level, but that’s expected to change over the next few years).
    . . .

    Bob Wilson
     
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  2. plug-it-in

    plug-it-in Active Member

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    After 6 happy years with a Mitsubishi iMiEV we recently "upgraded" to a Hyundai Kona EV.

    Our first longish (~500km) round trip with the Kona necessitated two trips to DC fast chargers. One was a must have the other to avert possible, last mile, range anxiety on the way home. Here is what I learned:
    1. Make sure you have enough juice left in the car to drive to an other charger. It could be 50-70km away. Two out of three networks failed us. Neither could start their charger.
    2. Kudos to Petro Canada's no nonsense, no membership card, approach. Swipe your credit/debit card and "start pumping" electrons.
    3. DC charging is not cheap. Generally you pay $20/hr. It should not be a surprise, it takes money to install and manage these networks. Owners of older, or slow charging models are ripped off by the pay by time charging. A Porsche Taycan will have a bigger feed/hour than a Nissan Leaf.

    In any case DC fast chargers should only be used when on long (or longish ) trips. DC fast charging is hard on the battery. It demonstrably effects battery longevity.

    All DC charge networks should be forced by law to move into the 21st Century by:
    - having credit/debit card readers and/or accept tap from Google/Apple Pay, and
    - charge by the amount of energy (kWh) dispensed, not by time.

    Happy motoring
     
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  3. hill

    hill High Fiber Member

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    yes - it CAN be hard - but the true enemy is poor thermal management & heat. Charging near the top of capacity is where the heat is mostly generated. That's why ev's are programmed to slow so much nearing top of capacity, so as to reduce that heat generation near the top end. Porsche has given their taycan a much larger unusable buffer near the top, which in theory will increase longevity by avoiding much of that heat ever coming into play. The downside is the Porsche has to Lug around a lot more battery weight for that benefit.

    And congratulations on the Hyundai Kona, that's a great Ev! Fast DC Electric car charging around the u.s. varies greatly. Some are free, & some are over 50¢ per kwh. When we bought our model X, it was one of the last to get free supercharger use. We made a lot of use out of that benefit, traveling around the nation.
    .
     
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  4. hill

    hill High Fiber Member

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    Another need for your EV of choice;
    A network that notifies your car's on-board display, exactly where the Quick Chargers are - according to your pre-programmed long-distance route. Plus - that same network can display how many stalls there are before you get there, how many stalls are occupied, or if the entire batch/location is temporarily down, which then automatically reroutes you to an alternate location to charge.
    That's describing the supercharger Network. It even tells how many KW their specific locations operates with during your visit.
     
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