Cost for Brake Job

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by Rebound, Apr 16, 2019.

  1. Rebound

    Rebound Senior Member

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    My Prius is at 142,000 and about due for its first (and probably last) brake job.

    I got a quote online for Toyota OEM front and rear pads and calipers for $401. The quote looks pretty thorough to me, any comments about whether the price is good?

    I asked him for an inclusive quote, so he included a bunch of “hardware kits” which will probably be self-evident. This is what I asked for; if I’m going to replace brakes once in the vehicle’s life, I may as well be thorough. I attached a screenshot of the quote.

    IMG_1281.jpg
     
  2. NutzAboutBolts

    NutzAboutBolts Senior Member

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    That’s way more hardware kits than you need lol... you can also reuse the old hardware and shims to save you money.
     
  3. Dan05979

    Dan05979 Member

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    jesus! do yourself a favor and go on rockauto.com and get your own parts. I did my front and rears reused the clips and shims and paid around $150
     
  4. ETC(SS)

    ETC(SS) The OTHER One Percenter.....

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    +1 on the hardware and shims.
    The rotors are a wobbler.
    Pun nearly unintended.

    Unless you're a moron, suffering from tinnitus, live in Boston or New York or have a teenage driver your old rotors should be OK 140k.
    In fact...they might not even need to be turned...BUT....the price for the new rotors isn't all that unreasonable, and I might be tempted by the new ones depending on what shape the old ones are in and whether or not they need to be turned and what that would cost.

    Who is doing the labor and what are they charging?
    As stated above you can probably DIY this.....RIGHT.....for WAAAY less than $200, but if you're not going to swing the wrenches yourself then a little more strategery might be called for before you start buying pieces/parts.
     
  5. The Critic

    The Critic Resident Critic

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    Shims can be reused.

    Clean and re-use the front hardware, but replace the rear hardware. The rear hardware kit is now coated and should reduce the likelihood of the pads binding in the bracket

    Rotors will be a hot topic. In general, replacing the pads only in the rear is a safe bet and the fronts should ideally be machined using an on-car lathe or new rotors should be installed.
     
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  6. Hammond_Egger

    Hammond_Egger New Member

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    I just did front and rear on my 2011 using Wagner parts. I replaced rotors/pads/HW kits, it was half price of what you were quoted.
    The back pads on mine were some cheap chinese garbage that were binding on the shims. The front and rear rotors were toast (warped and pitted as the car was from upstate NY and PA). Smooth as silk now.
    The labor is super easy to do.
     
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  7. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    One strategy is to have all the hardware kits on hand, but only use what turns out to be needed each time you look at the brakes.

    You really ought to be looking at the brakes every 30,000 miles or so, or even more often. I just look at mine when I rotate tires, 'cause what would be an easier time? Often all I do is inspect, look for even wear, measure the pad thickness, update my estimate of when I'll need pads, make sure the pins slide and the support plates are slippery, and put everything back together, no parts.

    Every now and then I find the support plates (a/k/a "fitting kit") to be rusted enough that the pad ears don't slide in them easily, and I replace those. So far that's all my gen 3 has needed yet.
     
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  8. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    Just editorial, think you meant to say rotors?

    $401 is a good price.

    As to what's needed or not, seems a shame to just willy-nilly replace everything. There's a good chance you only need new pads.

    Next in line, the shims/clips, may or may not be worthwhile to save. I would reuse them, untill the side clips really started to rust, looked iffy.

    The end clips, the ones that push into the caliper mounting bracket, are probably good for the life of the vehicle. I've never changed those.

    Caliper pin boots, probably fine too. But again: inspect them first, change IF needed.

    Rotors? I really suspect the dealerships NEVER get out a dial indicator and micrometer, just pull off perfectly good rotors (with a wee bit of rust), and slam in shiny new ones.

    Still, that's a good price.
     

    Attached Files:

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  9. Dan05979

    Dan05979 Member

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    i'm for replacing rotors when doing a brake job, it's not that expensive.
     
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  10. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    I've never replaced a rotor when diy'ing pad replacement. For the record: one time I should have. Check them against spec with a dial indicator and micrometer, and you might think again.

    Front:

    upload_2019-4-17_12-37-43.png
    upload_2019-4-17_12-38-28.png

    Rear:

    upload_2019-4-17_12-39-30.png
    upload_2019-4-17_12-40-15.png
     
  11. danlatu

    danlatu Senior Member

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    Your prius should just need pads front and maybe in rear, clean/re-grease slider pins and use crc brake quite sauce on back of pads. Special tool to compress rear calipers. Wire brush and brake clean parts. DIY and save 345$ If you want better brakes, go with semi-metallic pads. They produce more dust but are more responsive.

    wagner oe ceramic pads front and rear 30$
    lisle rear caliper brake tool 7$
    permatex silicone brake pin grease 12$
    crc brake disc quite 5$

    Rockauto.com has amazing prices.

    Screen Shot 2019-04-19 at 12.06.44 AM.png
     
    #11 danlatu, Apr 19, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2019
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  12. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    Funny, my own experience is almost exactly inside-out from that. When I inspect my brakes, I usually find nothing at all wrong with the pads, the slide pins only need a little out-and-in-ing to be moving smoothly again, and the rotor is fine. But it's not uncommon for those "end clips", a/k/a fitting kit, a/k/a support plates, to be roughened with rust.

    Those pieces are meant to be installed dry. Any grease added there would just be a road-grit magnet. They come from the factory coated in a dry Teflon-like substance, but it isn't eternal.

    As a point of reference, if you are reassembling the rear brakes and these clips are in as-new condition, you won't be able to set the caliper back over the pads unless you use one hand to hold the pads clamped together on the rotor. The clips are slippery enough that the little V-shaped springs atop the pads will spread the pads right apart if you haven't got a hand clamping them.

    Usually, after a season or two, those clips aren't anywhere near that slippery anymore, and the pads just stay put. Of course they do that when you're driving too.
     
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  13. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    I''ve used a C-clamp to keep the pads from springing away from the rotor unitl the caliper's back on.
     
  14. Hammond_Egger

    Hammond_Egger New Member

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    Check your rear pads well! Here is what I found when I pulled apart my rears:

    [​IMG]

    I knew when I test drove the car the rotors were bad, but whoever did the brakes were clueless!
     
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  15. Bay Stater

    Bay Stater Senior Member

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    My original pads after 145K. Replaced both front and back. Also had to replace the right rear caliber slide pins.
    IMG_20190413_110549593.jpg
     
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