Decided to start doing my own maintenance, any tips on tooling needed.

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by [email protected], Sep 15, 2020.

  1. Uli@

    [email protected] New Member

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    So I decided to start doing my own car maintenance after getting quotes for brake changes in the $800 price zones and above. I wanted to do it sooner but living in apartments maintenance is supposedly banned in the parking area yet almost everyday I see someone with their car jacked up doing some work on their car. I currently have basic tools but in SAE and am looking to build a new metric toolbox for my cars. What are some specialty/recommended tools that I may need for work on gen 3 Prius? Also what is a good set of jack stands and jack. Im a review hound and go direct to the low star reviews before going to the positive 5 star ones and I keep reading of certain jack stands failing aswell as jacks and I even looked into getting ramps but decided against it since there were quite a few review pictures of people ramps being cracked and failing so yeah this has made it hard to decide what jack/stands to purchase. Does anyone have links to reliable maintenance manuals? I was looking into haynes manuals but I would feel more comfortable working with actual toyota manuals over 3rd party stuff if its possible to get. My first project will be changing my spark plugs since my Prius is now at 122k miles and ill start on that next month just waiting on some tooling to arrive and a new months budget to reset(this months was spent on new tools) to purchase the spark plugs. Any tips will help. Thank You!
     
  2. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    You don't need any special tools for the Prius. You can buy a complete metric set with basic sizes of wrenches and sockets. You may want to pick up some good screwdriver sets too. That's it

    8mm - 14mm
     
  3. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    Here is the wiki page with the skinny on your access to the real manuals.

    There's a thread on what are your most common tools? here, that digresses occasionally, but has some good suggestions.

    Something for asking your car what it's telling you when it's telling you stuff will be useful all the time. If you search here with the word techstream you will get a lot of ideas.

    Probably you already have a multimeter for basic electrical checks? If not, that....

    The special socket for your oil filter cap.

    14mm spark plug socket. You can get by with 9/16 if that one's in your SAE set.

    At least one torque wrench covering the range of torques for things you're planning to work on. If you start with one, probably one with a 3/8" drive will cover the most useful part of ordinary-maintenance torque ranges.
     
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  4. Elektroingenieur

    Elektroingenieur Senior Member

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    In addition to the thread that @ChapmanF kindly linked, see my answer to a similar question in another thread.
    I’d agree, in the general sense that ordinary metric hand tools are sufficient for most tasks.

    The term “special tools” (Toyota’s “special service tools,” SSTs) refers to tools that dealers are required to provide for their technicians, in principle because they are unique to specific makes and models of vehicles, and thus shouldn’t be expected to among the common hand tools that technicians must own and bring to the job. Toyota SSTs are specified in the Repair Manual (more info) and listed in the master indexes on the Bosch Automotive Service Solutions website; a technician can go an entire career and not use them all.

    The oil filter wrench is a Toyota special tool (09228-06501), but since it’s used so often, there are many aftermarket equivalents. It’s the only SST needed for routine maintenance work on Prius cars.
     
  5. Majafamily

    Majafamily Junior Member

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    Better tools make the job so much easier. Slowly building my tool collection and in addition to above posts, I'd recommend 3/8 and 1/2 breaker bars to help loosen stubborn bolts. Prius related, they made breaking the transmission plugs, and removing the oil filter easy.
     
  6. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    Honda oil filter socket works well with Toyota filters, same size. For either spin-on or the $*#! other style.

    I tend to get tools as I need them. Not the most economical way I'm sure, but works for me.

    Floor jack with good lift, say 3 ton. 3 ton and 6 ton safety stands, 4 of each. Heavy rubber wheel chocks, four of.

    Funnels, oil drain pans.

    Multimeter, charger, electronic load tester, test probe, jump pack.

    Torque wrenches: 1/2, 3/8 and 1/4. Start with 1/2 I guess. Even the cheap ones have worked fine and held up, at least in my experience.

    A multitude of ratchet wrenches, big, small, short and long. Solid and swivel head. Start with a regular 3/8 I think. But for breaking loose tough bolts a 1/2" drive with extra long handle will save your knuckles.
     
  7. Grit

    Grit Senior Member

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    Guess oil filter changes will be done at the lube shops :eek:
     
  8. Grit

    Grit Senior Member

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    Been there and done that. You can search for DIY garage shops around, they have lifts and every single tool imagine or needed. They'll charge you by the hour and it includes all tools at no charge. The one that I go to charges $29 an hour + oil recycle fee if changing oil, just let them drive your car onto the lift and you do everything yourself. If you doubt that they don't have a specific tool, just call ahead of time and they'll find a way to have it there.
     
  9. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    I bring my oil and filter to a shop and pay them $10 to do it. I don't have tools for oil changes
     
  10. Majafamily

    Majafamily Junior Member

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    Interesting how every independent shop (which honestly all too many) I've been to in NorCal and socal hasn't let me do this years and years. Never bothered to ask a dealer.
     
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