Electric Rates (where you live)

Discussion in 'Gen 1 Prius Plug-in 2012-2015' started by markabele, May 18, 2013.

  1. markabele

    markabele owner of PiP, then Leaf, then Model 3

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    I'm very curious what electric rates are in different places in the country. Please post your rates including all the different tiers/time of the day/year. Thanks!
     
  2. retired4999

    retired4999 Prius driver since 2005

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    No tiers/time of the day/year. $0.102 kwh
     
  3. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Active Member

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    .061/kWh up to 1000 KwH, .071/kWh after that.
     
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  4. iplug

    iplug Senior Member

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    PG&E here. Most people are on a tiered, non-time-of-use plan here called the E-1 rate plan. It starts off at $0.132/kWh for the first few hundred kWh then quickly goes to $0.351/kWh where many homes use a lot of kWh at or near this tier, especially in the summer. PG&E claims $0.194/kWh yearly average for these customers.

    I am on the E-6 rate plan. This often works out well for those of us with solar as we can sell back our electricity at the same rate they charge us. This plan is both time of day, day of week, seasonal, and tiered. For most of the time I use off-peak electricity at $0.105/kWh in the winter and $0.101/kWh in the summer. They could potentially charge me as much as $0.506/kWh during peak/maximum tier times in the summer. However, I never go higher than the bottom tier rate of $0.207/kWh during peak summer hours. Actually, I don't even pay that. Rather that is what PG&E pays me as I have most of my panels on a southwest facing roof, so generate most of my electricity from mid-day to late afternoon in the summer then sell this back to PG&E at this rate. So I only get charged for about $0.103/kWh for the off-peak electricity then get a credit from PG&E for the extra peak electricity I generate, so about net zero at the end of the year.
     
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  5. iplug

    iplug Senior Member

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    Wow, that's a great rate!
     
  6. PriusInParadise

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    Dividing the total $ of my last bill by kWh used results in .342/kWh.
    By the way, regular gas is $4.269/gal.
     
  7. markabele

    markabele owner of PiP, then Leaf, then Model 3

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    Our rates in Lincoln, Nebraska are currently $0.10/kWh during the 4 hottest months of the year. The other 8 months are $0.072/kWh.

    I suppose that makes up a little bit for the decreased range during the cold months.
     
  8. retired4999

    retired4999 Prius driver since 2005

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    Gas 4.249/gal in Wisconsin. (n)
     
  9. markabele

    markabele owner of PiP, then Leaf, then Model 3

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    I currently don't have the time (might later)...but it would be an interesting spreadsheet to see what people pay for their electrical rates vs. current gas prices.
     
  10. iplug

    iplug Senior Member

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    On a bit of a side note, you can look up what percent of your electricity comes from coal, gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables etc.: How clean is the electricity I use? - Power Profiler | Clean Energy | US EPA

    Some regions/utilities have lots of cheap hydro power, but much of the rest with low electricity rates relies heavily on coal with a high CO2 footprint. Fortunately coal plants represent a smaller and smaller part of the national energy mix each year.
     
  11. hill

    hill High Fiber Member

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    Here's a screen shot of So Cal's 5 tiers ... but the pic is from over 2 years ago, and each tier has gone up about 5% per year ... so do the math accordingly:

    [​IMG]

    The more you use - the more your pay ... which is kind of like paying your income tax, generally. BTW, one should remember (and stated I think in a thread above) that EVERY utility company posts its rates ... so one can actually look up rates for any area of any state you want. I suppose asking all of us is easier though. :p
    The GOOD thing is, that our PV SOLAR surplus (each month) is weighted on the same tiered plan. So, during may, June & July we actually generate surplus up and into tier THREE !! Woo Hoo! So the utility has to credit us more, under their own plan. We have about 400kWh's of PV surplus on Edison's books right now. We cashed out about $200 last year, after accumulating over a couple years. But the utility does NOT pay us for the bottom tier .... no. The utility pays us at their rock bottom wholesale rate - that they have to buy power from - when they buy it from other states. That amount? A paltry 3¢/kWh. Oh well ... that's better than NOTHING - which is what we used to get, until the clean energy groups raised a huge outcry.
    So ... all that said ... I suppose if we WERE paying for power ... we'd be at paying at wholesale ... 3¢/kwh ... instead of getting paid by our utility.
     
  12. iplug

    iplug Senior Member

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    Yeah, I think you are right. With PG&E here up north, with PV panels, you get the full credit value at the highest tier you produced but after you run net zero, you get paid back peanuts as a net producer.
     
  13. hill

    hill High Fiber Member

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    Not that I'm complaining! The surplus benefits our crappy / decrepit grid ... so that's a good thing. Oh, and case anyone's interested, here's what a bill looks like (sorry, couldn't find any more recent) when you produce solar. It shows our daily use/or surplus, in kWh's as a graph:

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, during winter we put up lots of lights, use lots of power plus days are short and cloudy. Then may & june comes and we crank up electric production! But around July & August it gets hot so we run the AC and totally MUNCH our PV output :LOL: .
    .
     
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  14. cwerdna

    cwerdna Senior Member

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    I'm in PG&E land, aka ripoff. :(

    Understand Your Electric Charges is a calculator for E-1 but doesn't include taxes and fees. Try putting in 95136 for zip code and no for CARE (for low income folks).

    http://www.pge.com/tariffs/tm2/pdf/ELEC_SCHEDS_E-6.pdf from Pacific Gas & Electric - Tariffs is the schedule for E-6. I'm in area X of Understanding Baseline Quantities so my baseline is 11.0 kwh/day for "summer" and 11.7 for "winter".

    Seattle City Light: Electric Rates & Provisions has real cheap electricity as does
    Rates | About Us | Snohomish County PUD
    .


    2013 Rates (January 1, 2013)
    is REALLY cheap. Demand charges should be NA for a household unless you somehow draw over 30 or 50 KW at a time...
     
  15. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    .16/ kwh, no tiers, no tou. demand charges on commercial only.
     
  16. wjtracy

    wjtracy Senior Member

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    VA we have $0.11/kWhr (close to national average). Dominion had an off-peak charging trial for plug-ins, a few here with PiPs got into that pilot program.

    Somewhere around 0.24/kWhr is approx. parity with gaso at $4/gal. In other words for most, currently elec for EV is cheaper fuel than gaso for ICE. Of course, the EV needs a relatively expensive Li battery to take advantage of the fuel price difference.
     
  17. RBooker

    RBooker Member

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    Here in upstate NY we currently pay:

    12.1 cents kWh + ~6% tax
    3.69 gallon of gas

    We have solar panels and net metering. In late March our utility pays us 3.3 cents per excess kWH. Our panels should generate enough power to cover charging our PIP.
     
  18. DadofHedgehog

    DadofHedgehog Active Member

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    I'm one of those Dominion Virginia (name of our Big Utility) PIP pilot members. Here's my year-round rate for the hard-wired (and physically verified by D-Va) 2d meter L2 EVSE, on a 24-hour clock:
    0600 - 2200 = 17.97 c/KWh
    2200 - 0100 = 8.63 c/KWh
    0100 - 0500 = 5.36 c/KWh
    0500 - 0600 = 8.63 c/KWh

    ..guess when we charge?

    Additionally, the residential rate (our house via the main meter) is 11 c/KWh, and I installed a 2d 240V socket next to the Leviton L2 hard-wired EVSE, a socket which we use with PeeF's EVSE Upgrade-modified OEM car EVSE essentially for day charging on the weekends, and for some evening charging after I get back from work and my son "has to" borrow the car.
    Note: Son and I test-drove a 2013 Nissan Leaf today for a potential 2d car. If we go for it (and we might - that Leaf's a purty good 2d car), the 2d socket will come in handy.
     
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  19. fuzzy1

    fuzzy1 Senior Member

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    My particular district pays a base charge of about $60/year, plus about $0.054/kWh for the first tier (10kWh/day in summer, 16 in winter), then $0.116/kWh beyond that. There is no time-of-use structure. We are one year into a 30% rate hike plan spread evenly over five years.

    I'm putting up a starter-sized PV system right now, and hope to have it online in the coming week. In addition to annualized net metering (excess summer production is 'banked', offsetting winter use), there is a state incentive of $0.15/kWh for total production (until 2020), not just for what gets put into the grid.

    There is a much larger incentive for Made In Washington components, but most of that benefit is priced into the available equipment. Weather and shade impairments here mean that those products are best left for other customers with better conditions. So I ended up with Made In Oregon panels.
     
  20. Bonefish Blues

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    In the land of UK, I'm paying 6p/KWh overnight, 12p between 7am and Midnight (about 9c and 18c respectively)

    The petrol's the killer - currently paying £1.319 per litre, or a fraction under £6 per (the slightly larger) UK gallon - $9
     
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