Fast Charging with a Prius Plug-in

Discussion in 'Gen 1 Prius Plug-in 2012-2015' started by CaliforniaBear, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. CaliforniaBear

    CaliforniaBear Clearwater Blue Metallic

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    1,174
    285
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius
    Model:
    Plug-in Base
    This article makes me wonder about the infrequent "fast charge" available when driving down I80 from Donner Summit to the Sacramento Valley. If you keep the speed modest, say 55 mph, you can get a complete charge in less than an hour. Perhaps one should use the B-mode more instead of getting the "free" full charge. Fast-charging damages electric car batteries | News
     
  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

    Joined:
    May 11, 2005
    87,561
    38,973
    0
    Location:
    boston
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius Plug-in
    Model:
    Plug-in Base
    i would guess toyota accounted for this, but i could be wrong

    i don't understand what they are saying, don't tesla batteries have a pretty good track record?
     
  3. CaliforniaBear

    CaliforniaBear Clearwater Blue Metallic

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    1,174
    285
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius
    Model:
    Plug-in Base
    Yes they do. Perhaps they know how to make better batteries. And overall battery advances in technology are going well.
     
  4. jerrymildred

    jerrymildred Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    7,491
    9,198
    0
    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    Vehicle:
    2017 Prius Prime
    Model:
    Prime Premium
    The car has a limit to how much current it will allow to flow into our out of the battery before it uses engine braking. There's also a limit to the battery temperature before the ICE comes on. It doesn't matter which direction the current is going, too much current will create excess heat. Think about how fast the battery will discharge at 60 mph in EV mode and then compare that to how quickly it charges coming down the pass. If I'm not mistaken, it discharges under reasonable use way fast than it charges going downhill.
     
    Data Daedalus likes this.
  5. CaliforniaBear

    CaliforniaBear Clearwater Blue Metallic

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    1,174
    285
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius
    Model:
    Plug-in Base
    That makes sense. So what's with the article?
     
  6. ATX4

    ATX4 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2020
    9
    4
    0
    Location:
    Asia
    Vehicle:
    Other Non-Hybrid
    Model:
    N/A
    Sounds like it's talking about DC fast charging or "Level 3" which is my guess. I can't view the original PDF, and maybe my English ability has degraded over time, but the article is kind of strangely worded in my opinion. "Internal resistance kicks in...", " Internal resistance charging..." Etc.

    Also, the whole point of the battery ECU is to monitor temperature of various cells/banks to prevent such damage, so I am not sure if we're to be led to believe Tesla designed their chargers to override the failsafes on the battery while fast charging or what?

    I might be missing something though.
     
  7. jerrymildred

    jerrymildred Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    7,491
    9,198
    0
    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    Vehicle:
    2017 Prius Prime
    Model:
    Prime Premium
    What the PiP and Prime do when regenerating isn't even in the same universe with, for example, a Tesla Supercharger. I found this chart at Tesla Model 3 V3 Supercharging: Is It Really That Fast?
    Table-Model3-V3-Supercharging-Time.jpg
    I don't know the voltage of the Tesla battery (just because I don't have time to research it now), so I don't know the current. Current is what produces heat for those not familiar with electricity. But at 250,000 watts, I'd expect a lot of amps.

    Nominal voltage for the Prime is 351.5V. That times the charge limit of 90 amps, that a maximum of 31.6kW. The PiP is lower and both would soon get warm enough to tell the car to stop charging pretty quickly at that rate. That happened to me one time in Colorado just before the battery got full. The Tesla charger maxes out at over 10 times that speed and doesn't drop below that until the battery is over 90% full. We can't even put 90% in our batteries.
     
  8. QuantumFireball

    QuantumFireball Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2016
    333
    199
    0
    Location:
    Ireland
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius Plug-in
    Yes, with the Prius (incl. non-PHEV) there's a current charge limit and current discharge limit that change dynamically based on SOC, battery temperature, and probably other factors. You can see this with the reports generated by Hybrid Assistant.
     
Loading...