First Post: 91k - what do I need done?

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by 12PriusTN, Jun 8, 2020.

  1. 12PriusTN

    12PriusTN New Member

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    First post on here!

    I am at 86,600 right now on my 2012 Prius 5. I am a sales rep for multiple brands covering TN/KY/AL/MS so I drive a LOT. I am not car savvy beyond being able to replace the cabin and engine air filter.

    When should I get the transmission fluid replaced and how much is this generally? I typically do not trust dealerships

    Last question: I am due for another oil change at 91,500 and in the below photo is where my coolant is - should I go out and buy some to fill? If so what is the recommended brand/kind

    excuse my lack of knowledge

    thanks!
    IMG_4147.jpeg
     
  2. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    Toyota Super Long Life coolant is the spec. Toyota says you can use alternatives, IF they're.... long list follows. Simplest is to use spec'd coolant, should be available from parts dept of dealership, for around $20~25 per gallon, pre-mixed.

    Unfortunately that's THE size, and you only need a few ozs. It can be used, down the road, for coolant change.

    For transaxle fluid change Toyota keeps stumph, except to say ONLY use Toyota ATF WS.

    If you purchase 4 qts that will be enough. Proper level is achieved by filling till it starts coming back out, with the car level. Torque for full and drain bolts is 29 ft/lb.

    Dealership service, if they're agreeable to do it, should be $80~100 (max). Any more, they're incompetent or larcenous, or both.
     
  3. pjksr02

    pjksr02 Active Member

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    First, are you up to date with any recalls for your car?

    You're a little early on the recommend coolant mileage and time, and the coolant is at the low level, but not below. If you have a place to store a gallon of coolant, get some and add it, but if you don't have a garage, you can just watch the level (was the picture taken with a cold engine?). Personally, I'd just change the engine coolant and the inverter coolant at 8 years, and the transmission fluid too. (Plus, the drains for the transmission and for the inverter coolant are close to each other under the car.)
     
  4. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    Funny thing: for the States the coolant change recommendation is:

    Engine: 100K miles or 10 year, 50K miles or 5 years thereafter
    Inverter: 150K miles or 15 year, 50K miles or 5 years thereafter

    But in Canada, roughly translated to miles, it's:

    100K miles or 10 year, 50K miles or 5 years thereafter For both.

    I even emailed Toyota Canada, and they said yes, both. Then (of course) there's a decal on the inverter reservoir on ours, which says:

    "do not change until 150 miles", with no mention of months.

    So anyhoo, I'll go by the Toyota Canada recommendation.
     
  5. 12PriusTN

    12PriusTN New Member

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    thanks for all of the fast responses

    I am up to date on all recalls. I also get the oil changed every 10k at the local Toyota dealer and 5k tire rotation. The last time I was at the local Toyota dealership service center he told me that he would recommend replacing the transmission fluid on my next oil change (91k). To my knowledge it has never been done before - this is what service records on the Toyota owners website says.

    I was referring to filling up the coolant and not replacing it since it was on the low side. The photo was taken when the engine had just been turned off. I do not have a place to store a gallon of coolant

    I would appreciate your feedback on the transmission fluid and any other recommended upkeep to the vehicle. To date it has just been recall work and oil changes on this car and it has been running very well

    thanks
     
  6. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    ask them how much to change the tranny fluid. if it's under $150. have them add some coolant at the same time.
    if not, shop around for someone to change it. buy the tranny fluid and coolant, tell them to keep the left over.
    you should start researching the egr circuit here, before you blow the head gasket.

    and have the 12v replaced if it's original, or at least load tested.

    do you check the tire pressure periodically, including the spare?
     
  7. 12PriusTN

    12PriusTN New Member

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    Thanks for the response! I do check air pressure frequently. I honestly have no idea what the egr circuit is but I will look into it here. Is there something I should be doing to avoid blowing the head gasket?

    Lastly everyone on here here is saying “replace” the coolant - can I not simply add more in?

    again sorry for my lack of knowledge- trying to become more educated

    thanks!
     
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  8. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    yes, you can just add more. look at your maintenance schedule for mileage/years to change it.

    the egr circuit clogs up, and creates pressure on the head gasket. along with the many threads here, @NutzAboutBolts has a great youtube video showing how to clean it.
     
  9. 12PriusTN

    12PriusTN New Member

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    thanks again for the response, I did some research and watched YouTube videos on how to clean the egr. One thing I can’t find is is this cleaning something that is required at a certain mileage or only something to do if you are experiencing problems?


    Thanks
     
  10. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    usually before 100k, but it is random, and some people find more clogging than others. if you ask a dealer, they won't know what you're talking about, and toyota is in complete denial, although they did update pistons and rings in 2014 and 15 without giving an explanation.
     
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  11. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    The transaxle fluid change I would do asap. It's comparable to an oil change. Coles Notes version:

    If you want to play it safe (I would), only use Toyota ATF WS. Car raised and level, drain, then fill till it starts coming out, torque fill and drain bolts to 29 ft/lbs with new washers. Both bolts are socket-head-cap-screw, require a 10 mm hex key. Do NOT use an Allen key (and cheater pipe), get the proper socket and torque wrench. Info in attached.

    I would not pay over $100 USD, $80 would be a good price.

    Boiler plate info:

    The simplest way to see where you're at, is to check the degree of carbon build up in the EGR pipe, a stainless steel connecting pipe between the EGR valve and intake manifold. Watch @NutzAboutBolts video #16 here:

    Nutz About Bolts Prius Maintenance Videos | PriusChat

    Two or three other videos linked there too, for the full cleaning of the intake manifold, full EGR clean, and Oil Catch Can install.

    Good thread:

    EGR & Intake Manifold Clean Results | PriusChat

    Another:

    Oil Catch Can, Eliminate that knock! | PriusChat

    Some tools worth having:

    E8 Torx socket (mandatory)
    E6 Torx socket (optional, but good to have, to remove the throttle body studs from intake manifold)
    3/8" ratchet wrench, regular and long handle, flex head, you can never have enough (or 1/2 plus reducer)
    1/4" ratchet wrench, or 3/8" to 1/4" reducer
    Ratchet extensions: you can never have enough
    Long needle nose piers, straight and bent tip
    Ratcheting 12mm box wrench (optional, but makes disconnection of the EGR cooler from exhaust easier)
    Torque wrench (3/8" and 1/4" both good to have)
    Floor jack and safety stands (or ramps): basically some method to raise front, if you need to take underpanel off, which you may need to, both for access and to recover dropped items.

    Comment regarding clamping of coolant hose, mentioned and or shown in videos:

    1. When removing the intake manifold for cleaning, you do need to lift the throttle body off the intake manifold. Still, the coolant hoses connected to the throttle body have ample slack, enough that you can leave them connected, and just tie the throttle body to something adjacent, say the inverter wiring harness.

    2. When removing the EGR cooler, removing coolant hoses is necessary, but if you drain 2 liters/quarts from the radiator drain spigot prior (into a clean container), the coolant level in the system will be dropped below the EGR componennts, and you won't spill anything. Just be sure to not tip the cooler when lifting it off (and catch the rear gasket): there are a few tablespoons of coolant trapped at the lower back corner.

    Pour that into your previous drained coolant, and when done pour it back into the reservoir. If you've got the coolant bleed bolt (2010, 2011 model years), leave it open while pouring the coolant back in, till coolant starts coming out. For later model years, leave the topmost coolant hose on EGR disconnected till coolant starts coming out. Also, might help to burp the main radiator hose as you pour the coolant back in.
     
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