From o2 sensor to engine replacement in 10 days?

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by FantasticalMagicOne, Dec 29, 2018.

  1. padroo

    padroo Senior Member

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    When you change the O2 sensor make sure you visually inspect the plug and wiring in that area.
     
  2. Skibob

    Skibob Senior Member

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    One of the Amazon reviews showed how to replace it from the top
     
  3. Leadfoot J. McCoalroller

    Leadfoot J. McCoalroller Senior Member

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    Although I have to wonder if a "quickie" means of changing it without removing inverter etc. was how the current sensor wound up (apparently) leaking.
     
  4. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    If I paid for this service, I would bring it back to the dealer and have them redo it. If it has to be towed in, I would have them cover it.
     
  5. FantasticalMagicOne

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    A review on the socket notes that the socket is too long to change it without removing the inverter. I'd prefer to be thorough. You do go in from the top anyhow, and if they didn't put something else back together properly, I'll remedy it.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  6. FantasticalMagicOne

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    If only I could trust them. They are firm in their diagnosis of a dead engine and I'd hate to drive off that lot a 3rd time in a dangerously unsafe vehicle.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
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  7. Skibob

    Skibob Senior Member

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    I think the dealer installed the sensors. Someone on Amazon talks about grinding down the outside of one of the wrenches to fit inside the sensor. That would be the cheapest way if you have access to a bench grinder.
     
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  8. FantasticalMagicOne

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    The dealer installed the sensors and the catalytic converter, but the downstream and cat were purchased from the dealership and the upstream I brought in.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  9. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    I would insist on making an appointment to have their shop foreman available to assist you. That's the top service tech in their shop and there's no way he would not know there's a leak (if it's loud up front). A Jr. mechanic probably serviced your car and you just need someone higher up the chain.

    But I can understand your dilemma, it's very unfortunate you are put in this position
     
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  10. FantasticalMagicOne

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    The tech should have caught this. Whether by sight or the fact that it didn't fit, I would have paid for their time and obtained the proper part. I don't believe there is any way that they didn't know this was unsafe, and their costly resolution resolved nothing (and may have been unnecessary). This, very realistically, could have killed us.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  11. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    We actually don't know if the part they installed is actually a working part. We are assuming it's not working because of the problems you're experiencing and that Toyota cars really don't like anything non Denso for sensors. But it also could be a perfectly good working part, just installed wrong.

    Right now it's all assumptions, based on the loud noise and code thrown by the car. Hopefully that's it and it won't throw you a curve ball later
     
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  12. VFerdman

    VFerdman Senior Member

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    I would agree with @FantasticalMagicOne on not wanting to take the car to that dealership ever again. I understand that it would be a lot more convenient if dealerships were competent, responsible and cared about the quality of work they produce, but I have yet to meet such a dealer. I did know a few (two or three) indie mechanics that I trusted implicitly (after getting to know them and their work), however. If such a person is available to help, I would encourage to seek their help as this job seems a bit complicated (involving removal of inverter). Having said that, I would have no problems diving into something like that by myself and I have a feeling that the OP is of similar mind.

    Someone who CARES about the result is worth more than someone who has more experience, but does not give a rat's a$$. Dealers are notoriously in the not giving a rat's a$$ category, especially the dealer in question (well proven by previous experience). It's better to get this done than to being "right" about dealer's incompetency, IMO. It would be very sweet to hear that the dealer suddenly realized their mistakes and done right by the customer, but I would not hold my breath for that and that is why I would go ahead and attempt the job myself.

    Sounds like @FantasticalMagicOne feels confident in being able to do it and that is 90% of success right there. It's just nuts and bolts, after all, not brain surgery. There is plenty of info and there is this thread rich with advice. I am certain the outcome will be much better if she attempts the job herself than trying to get the dealer to do the right thing. I have way more confidence in her at this point than any mechanic at that dealership, including the foreman (who gave her the "dead engine" diagnosis).

    @FantasticalMagicOne, if you feel this is something you are comfortable attempting, I will be your greatest fan and supporter. Go for it! You will have at least learned how to R&R an inverter on gen 2 Prius. But more likely, you will have resolved this ridiculous situation that is keeping at least a half dozen people on PC up at nights :)
     
    #332 VFerdman, Jan 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
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  13. FantasticalMagicOne

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    I know that it may not be installed correctly. The site I bought it from had it specifically advertised for a gen 2 Prius, but looking at the 2 side by side leads me to believe it may not be the proper one. It was an auto parts dealer I had never purchased from before.

    Maybe a phone call to the general manager is worth a shot. I wanted to speak to him anyhow regarding this matter. An engine loaded with oil sludge? That was an outright lie and wouldn't have resolved the problem. But would have had me eat the cost of (possibly*) another unnecessary repair.

    *I don't know that the cat couldn't have been welded instead of replaced. My brother-in-law is a welder and he said that it could, but he did so without looking at it. I also don't know if the downstream sensor was bad. I want to see the diagnostic they did and also inquire as to how they did the diagnostic and missed sludge filled engine (which we all know that they didn't).

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  14. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    A dealer does not have to be right in their diagnostics to recommend a service, that's the unfortunate part. Many times people will replace part after part chasing a problem, spend thousands of dollars and not get the results they are after. A service dept (whether it's a dealer or private shop) only has to put in a good faith effort in trying to repair your car. It's pretty sad
     
  15. FantasticalMagicOne

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    I'm pretty handy, albeit I'm better at things like hanging drywall and replacing pipes. Not too bad at electrical work either (depending on the task). I had the fortunate upbringing that always consisted of the only person you can rely on is yourself, and was taught many things that little girls don't usually learn. Obviously, I know that sometimes reaching out for help is the best option (did I mention how grateful I am to all of you?).

    Learning about automobile repair isn't beyond me, but I do wish that I could start with something less complicated. I know it'll be okay as it's not the first time I've been thrown to the wolves.


    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
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  16. FantasticalMagicOne

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    It's very sad, but in this case (after the second service), they knew for sure that this (engine replacement) was not the answer.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  17. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

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    Another objective in a dealer service dept, besides taking all your hard earned money, is to scare you out of your car so you'll buy a new one.

    Reading your previous post about not having the room to tighten the sensor if the inverter is not removed, I'm curious if this happened at your dealer service. Maybe when you get to the sensor, see if you can tighten it down (with a little torque, don't over do it) before removing it.
     
  18. FantasticalMagicOne

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    From what I understand, there isn't enough room to fit a ratchet along with the socket (it's too long) to be able to get the socket around the sensor, let alone turn it.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  19. FantasticalMagicOne

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    And yes, they tried very hard to get me to buy a new car. However, I don't make car payments outside of the first one and a new car, or a new to me car, is not in the cards right now.

    I don't think they anticipated me knowing enough about my car to be suspicious. I've been researching the HV battery since before I bought the car. I knew the lifespan on them was finite and, at 7yrs, it might be up soon (should have researched the 12v). I didn't decide on this car until I knew that it could be refurbished.

    I also know that full synthetic oil doesn't usually sludge and that if the previous owner didn't use full synthetic it would have flushed out long ago. You don't need to be an automotive expert to see that something was very wrong.

    I don't need a new car.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  20. strawbrad

    strawbrad http://minnesotahybridbatteries.com

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    Here's a video for replacing the front O2 sensor. It will give you an overview of the process. Learn from this guys mistakes.


    I did this job on one of my cars a few years ago. I remember it's not easy. A buddy loaned me a socket that he ground down so it would fit that stupid small heat shield. He told me the sensor could not be removed from the bottom. Being so challenged I proceeded to do so. ( I own lots of extensions, u joints, and ratchets.) I do remember starting the extension from the back side of the socket. Getting to the wire plug is also difficult.

    Here's a video for the rear O2 sensor. Don't forget you still have the P0137 code for this sensor.
     
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