Featured Great Use for Toyota's Hydrogen Fuel Cells

Discussion in 'Prius, Hybrid, EV and Alt-Fuel News' started by drash, Jan 12, 2023.

  1. drash

    drash Senior Member

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    A French company called EODev uses Toyota's fuel cell technology to make transportable hydrogen generators. When fed hydrogen it acts as a generator and can charge 8 EVs at a time.


    Doesn't say how or where they get their hydrogen from, but an interesting concept. The one they show in the tweet is the GEH2 which outputs 480V AC and 110 kVA (88 kW). Enough for 8 x 11 kW L2 connections. Has a built-in 44 kWh battery to deal with sudden surge requirements and temporary storage in case of hydrogen disruption. Weight is about 3,400 kg (7,496 lbs). Ideal for temporary/emergency situations and can act as a cogeneration for heat as well. I would guess they don't need 700 bar (70MPa, ~10,000 psi) hydrogen compression tanks, just a steady stream of hydrogen.

    If you want a DC output hydrogen battery, they make a smaller REXH2 that puts out 650 to 725 VDC and 70 kW.

    Company website:
    https://www.eo-dev.com
     
  2. hill

    hill High Fiber Member

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    that's the rub. It's likely akin to those honkin' diesel generators used to charge ev's ..... or the hydrogen filled diesel tanker chase truck following behind the hydrogen car. Only to fill the hydrogen car w/ fuel that's primarily reformed via fossil fuels.
    .
     
  3. 3PriusMike

    3PriusMike Prius owner since 2000, Tesla M3 2018

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    So the output is about 28% of one Tesla 250kw supercharger plug.

    I guess there is some emergency situation where this is a good idea.

    Mike
     
  4. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    dang, i thought they generated hydrogen
     
  5. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    Tesla has deployed diesel powered chargers to Superchargers during holiday rushes.
     
  6. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    Did you mean "has" or "had"? If "has", where are these diesel generators located?

    The reason I ask is this Wiki reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Supercharger

    . . .
    Tesla makes V3 superchargers at Giga New York.[36] Tesla first opened V3 stations in 2019, and they can provide up to 15 miles per minute (depending on circumstances).[37] A 1 MW charge box supplies 4 stalls at up to 250 kW each,[38][39] and can have a 575 kW battery storage.
    . . .

    I remember some of the earliest reports about 5 years ago on an incident of Tesla using rented diesel generators. Some Superchargers in California were locally saturated over a holiday weekend. So someone at Tesla rented diesel generators to handle the unexpected, peak load. But this never made sense as dealing with utility power cables is not trivial.

    Bob Wilson
     
    #6 bwilson4web, Jan 13, 2023
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2023
  7. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    It was exactly that.

    Just pointing out that Tesla had to deploy generators at times. Work rents them every year to run things while the annual electric maintenance was being done. As long as there is a need for these generators, this fuel cell units might be viable.
     
    #7 Trollbait, Jan 13, 2023
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2023
  8. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    The diesel generators should be able to power L2 chargers via NEMA 14-50 or equivalent high current outlets. I just don't see the diesel generators powering the SuperCharger power electronics. This would also increase the number of charging stalls.

    Bob Wilson
     
  9. hill

    hill High Fiber Member

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    this one time stunt from a few years back came to mind.
    kind of impressive
    https://electrek.co/2018/02/16/tesla-model-s-charged-diesel-generator/

    what wouldd REALLY be fun after the above experiment - would be to see how much diesel would be necessary to get the hydrogen reformed - and see if the hydrogen car can even get 5 miles down the road

    .
     
    #9 hill, Jan 13, 2023
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2023
  10. drash

    drash Senior Member

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    Then there is this cordless Tesla:
    「それってさ…」電気自動車に発電機を搭載!航続可能距離を大幅に伸ばすことに成功 | MOBY [モビー]

    Partial translation:
    "Equipped with 400cc engine for power generation in Tesla Model S

    On the YouTube channel “Warped Perception”, so-called “magical modifications” such as installing a jet engine in the Tesla Model S are popular content.

    On his channel, a video called "Cordless Tesla" has been released. I was able to drive a Tesla Model S for 1800 miles (about 2900 km) without charging.

    Model S has a maximum cruising range of about 400 miles, so we succeeded in extending the cruising range by more than four times. It was realized by the idea of "equipping the model S with a 400cc single-cylinder gasoline engine for power generation"."

    Wasn't very efficient IMHO. Consumed 82 gallons (372 L) of gas over 2900 km (1802 miles) or 1 L/7.8 km (22 mpg). The generator had to run all night to charge the car when parked.
     
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  11. bwilson4web

    bwilson4web BMW i3 and Model 3

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    There was a Leaf that had a micro turbine powered generator on a small trailer wired into the battery.

    Bob Wilson
     
  12. austingreen

    austingreen Senior Member

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    To power one L3 charger at 250 KW you need a big honking diesel generator like this. I picked a mobile one because odds are if you are doing this its because you haven't built the infrastructure yet, and it will be moved.

    https://www.zoro.com/generac-mobile-portable-generator-285-gal-ultra-low-sulfur-diesel-mdg250df4-std/i/G3294900/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=surfaces&utm_campaign=shopping%20feed&utm_content=free%20google%20shopping%20clicks&gclid=Cj0KCQiAn4SeBhCwARIsANeF9DIdCp5M25fWfGjrZpdpQWSJcGuesBCjmlEtoOF5Fea_Ki_QS61OOLQaAg8dEALw_wcB

    Add a 100 KWh battery to the mix and you can probably charge the first 2 vehicles at 175 KW in a 2 headed system.

    IIRC the toyota has a 128 kw fuel cell, maybe you pack 2 of those and that big battery for a 2 headed system.

    The problem with the fuel cell system versus the diesel is That diesel can run for 24 hours full power about 400 gallons, that is a fairly small inexpensive tank. That is about Need it to run longer bigger tanks are readily available. That is about 120 - 50 Kwh charges.

    Want to run that fuel cell the same amount you need about 300 kg of hydrogen. Tube trailers can carry up to 500 kg, so its not really necessary to replenish daily, but this is much more expensive and large. I can see government subsidies getting these in remote locations, but doesn't make sense where there is a reliable grid. That fuel cell should be less expensive up front than a reliable efficient diesel generator. The cost of fuel and storage is the problem, but it is solvable. Much less expensive in terms of TCO would be a renewable methanol generator or fuel cell if renewability is the key.
     
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