Hi all, new Prius v owner

Discussion in 'Prius v Main Forum' started by farmecologist, Jan 31, 2018.

  1. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Ok guys..you are loitering/littering up my thread! :LOL::D:p:LOL::D:p

    This thread is for *serious important stuff* only! :ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL:

    BTW - I am halfway thru the intake manifold project. Some of the dang tabs on the wire harness were tough to get off! All is good though..I got the thing out. I'm oxi-soaking the manifold now. Glad I did it...things were pretty darn dirty. EGR ports on the manifold were not fully clogged though...which is good news.

    Oh and I used *wire* to tie up the throttle body...so no twine *or* zip ties. :whistle:
     
    #41 farmecologist, Apr 20, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
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  2. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

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    We used to have a roll of bailing wire and duct tape at all times on the old farm where I grew up;).

    It was amazing what you could fix with those two simple things and a knife(y).
     
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  3. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

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    Those tabs can be a bit fiddly:cool:.

    But I’m sure you have some zip ties just in case:whistle:.

    I know I needed them:unsure:.

    Good luck with your cleaning(y).
     
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  4. Prodigyplace

    Prodigyplace Senior Member

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    Electric fence wire works well for many things.
     
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  5. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Intake manifold cleaning and new PCV valve is complete. No issues but boy were thing dirty! Much more so that I anticipated. I had a bit of a scare when I started it up after completion - the car shuddered (misfired?) a bit but no warning lights or anything. The shuddering stopped after a few seconds and hasn't occurred again. Maybe things were 'settling in'.

    Now for some pics.

    Here is what the throttle body and the engine side of the intake looked like after pulling stuff off :

    IMG_5238.jpg IMG_5241.jpg IMG_5249.jpg IMG_5261.jpg IMG_5260.jpg IMG_5262.jpg IMG_5259.jpg

    Not good...does this seem excessively dirty to anyone?

    The PCV valve tube even had crud in it! Luckily, I had planned on replacing it anyway :
    IMG_5275.jpg

    I did quite a few scrubbings and oxi-clean soakings. Seemed to be much more effective than brake cleaner.
    IMG_5290.jpg IMG_5280.jpg IMG_5292.jpg

    NOTE: The third photo shows rinsing via the EGR tube and water coming out of the EGR circuit ports. Oxi-soaking and rinsing this way seems to be the best way to handle the EGR circuit. Otherwise, you are at risk of leaving the EGR passages dirty.

    However, even after these soakings, the EGR passages still looked dirty..so I concentrated on them. Note the first photo is looking down the EGR passage with the metal EGR tube removed. I reattached the tube and poured oxi-clean solution down the tube until solution started running out of the EGR ports.
    IMG_5293.jpg IMG_5296.jpg

    NOTE: If I can contribute any advice...be sure to take a good look at the smaller EGR passage circuit! If the main ports look clean it does NOT mean the EGR passages are clean. I hope nobody overlooked this. :(

    It also took a heck of a long time to clean the ports on the engine side. This is the state I left them in..WAY better than before but not 'perfect' :

    IMG_5285.jpg IMG_5282.jpg IMG_5283.jpg IMG_5284.jpg

    Here is final product..note that I could not get every last bit of baked-on carbon off. However, I don't think that will make any difference. Oh and I did install a new gasket.
    IMG_5301.jpg IMG_5297.jpg IMG_5302.jpg

    Here is the new PCV valve and tube...and the manifold reinstalled :
    IMG_5304.jpg IMG_5305.jpg

    And lastly...my wire job to tie up the throttle body. As discussed above...I did NOT disconnect the coolant hoses. :LOL::D:ROFLMAO:
    IMG_5303.jpg

    Gee I think that is enough for now. I will leave the EGR cooler and spark plugs for another weekend!
     
    #45 farmecologist, Apr 21, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018
  6. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

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    I bet you’re glad you did this maintenance ;).

    Condition looks similar to what I’ve seen in the 4 times I have done it :(.

    But you got to it before it got you:).

    Good luck when you do the cooler(y).
     
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  7. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Hey guys...next piece of the puzzle to tackle are the spark plugs and EGR cooler. Figured I'd do both since the cowling looks like something I'd rather not do twice. :D

    The nutzaboutboltz video on the EGR is fabulous..but it is hard to see some of the bolts they needed to remove. Also looks like you need to remove some of the posts with a Torx bit...correct?

    Looks like I found the info I need in this thread..thanks in advance Mendel! (n)..any other advice?

    EGR valve removal and cleaning | PriusChat

    Also, if I do NOT drain any coolant...how much will leak out when I remove it? I have plenty of extra coolant so if not too much will be spilled..I'm thinking of taking the easy way out. :D Assuming I should pinch the coolant tubes shut before removing them...correct? I also seem to remember some mentioning to pinch off the tune at the reservoir to avoid excessive spillage.

    Thanks all for your help! You guys are gurus...hopefully I will get to join your ranks one day! (y)
     
  8. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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    Pinches hose doesn't help much, because a lot of the hoses are below the cooler/valve: you pinch them off, remove them, and the coolant promptly pours out of the EGR components, lol. My 2 cents: draining a couple of litres of coolant at the radiator drain spigot is the easy way out. If you have short length of surgical rubber tubing (adaptible inside diameter, will fit snug), say a foot, pushed onto the drain spigot, and a clean container marked with liters, drain a couple of liters carefully, you won't loose a drop.

    And, just be careful removing the EGR cooler: don't tip it when removing, then pour the 1/2 cup or so of coolant into your catch container.

    When done pour the caught coolant back into the reservoir (the level will have dropped in it), maybe squeeze various coolant hoses as you go, and leave the coolant vent valve (atop egr, white I believe) wide open, until coolant wells up in it, then quickly shut. Do the top up slowly as you near completion.

    Doing this I found the reservoir level ended up maybe 1/2" higher, slightly over full mark, and within a day or two of driving was back to normal level.

    I've taken the cowl off at least four times now, a little obsessive/compulsive I'd admit. Last time just lately, almost on a whim, decided to mouse-proof the cabin air intake. It gets very easy, especially if you've watched @NutzAboutBolts video. I have the most problem with those fussy plastic corner-of-windshield pieces. Also, I've noticed the post that the drivers windshield wiper pushes onto is starting to a look a little chewed. Put little points of masking tape at the outer corner tips of each wiper blade before lifting them off, for reference.
     
    #48 Mendel Leisk, Apr 23, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2018
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  9. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    I decided go 'go for it' this weekend. Got the spark plugs replaced and replaced the EGR cooler with my sparkling clean spare. (y) Also did the front brakes! All of this took quite a long time as it was my first time doing any of this and didn't want to screw anything up.

    Some things of note :
    • Wiper and cowling removal was pretty much just busy work. I had invested in the curved set of needle nose pliers that the nutzaboutboltz crew have used on multiple occasions ( I used their Amazon link ). Invaluable to get at the tabs on those pesky wiring connectors.
    • The cowling had crud blocking the drainage outlet on the passenger side. I promptly cleaned that out.
    • The EGR was a pain to remove until 'figured out' the best way to remove that bottom bracket nut. You have to 'reach around' from the back left side. Yes, I had read this but it is always difficult until you actually do it.
    • I did NOT drain any coolant while doing the EGR procedure. I just pinched the hoses off. Spilled a bit but no big deal. (y)
    • The EGR cooler was incredibly dirty. Lucky I had that spare! I have been cleaning the one I removed and finally have water flowing freely through it after muliple oxi-clean soaks. When I started it was only dripping water out the other end!
    • The plugs looked decent..which is good news. I replaced with Denso Iridium TT plugs.
    • The brakes were not in great shape. Rotors were pretty rusty and 'rust welded' on. Had to use the screw holes in the rotors to get them loose. Brake sliding pins were not sliding freely.
    • Brakes are not rocket science but this was my first brake job so I took my time. I should be able to do the rear brakes in far less time.
    • The zinc-plated rotors look great and hopefully will help with the rust situation.
    Here are some pics :

    Wipers and cowling removal :
    IMG_5306.jpg IMG_5307.jpg IMG_5309.jpg

    Spark Plugs that were removed :
    IMG_5310.jpg

    Dirty EGR components that were removed :
    IMG_5319.jpg IMG_5318.jpg IMG_5312.jpg IMG_5313.jpg

    Cleaned up EGR components ( I used my cleaned spare cooler ) :
    IMG_5326.jpg IMG_5323.jpg IMG_5327.jpg

    Trying to clean the removed EGR cooler ( BTW - a cheap rubber stopper assortment worked great ) :
    IMG_5328.jpg

    Brake removal..note the rusty rotors :
    IMG_5330.jpg IMG_5331.jpg

    New rotors ( zinc plated ) :
    IMG_5333.jpg IMG_5334.jpg IMG_5337.jpg IMG_5343.jpg IMG_5344.jpg


    That's enough for one weekend! (y)

    Next up is rear brakes and oil catch can...and then I'm pretty much 'done'.
     
    #49 farmecologist, Apr 29, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
  10. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

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    I bet you’re glad you had the spare ;).

    I’m cleaning our spare now and glad I don’t feel rushed as I would had I not dropped a few $$ to look ahead:).

    Those rotors show the salt is present :eek:.

    Glad it all worked out (y).
     
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  11. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Yes the rotors were worse than I anticipated. With all of the other stuff I have worked on ( dirty battery compartment, dust everywhere, etc..) I think the conclusion is that this poor Prius was run in a very dirty environment. I'm slowly rectifying that though (hopefully). o_O

    I put gas in again last week and it still has trouble filling up ( one of my original posts above ). I did some research back then and it seemed to lead to a potential 'evap canister' problem :

    Hi all, new Prius v owner | PriusChat

    I guess this should be added to the to-do list. (y) Has anyone ever dealt with or replaced a faulty evap canister? The post above mentioned 'cleaning the vent and tube' but I'm not even sure where to start. Being that the vehicle was run in a dirty environment, and the fact that there are no rear under panels on the Prius v, lead me to believe something may, in fact, be 'plugged'.
     
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  12. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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    Yeah about the 4th time I watched @NutzAboutBolts video I twigged to this. I think it was after I was done, lol. Still not that easy, but you can actually touch it.

    First time they'd seen light? How many miles? US schedule is 30K or tri-yearly for this. Those new rotors have me reaching for sun glasses. (y)
     
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  13. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Yes..from what I can tell I don't think the brakes had been serviced at all ( it is a 2012 ) o_O. Pads had quite a bit left on them but I replaced them anyways. Car has 129K now ( got it with 128K ).

    I did a little research to confirm what I had read earlier regarding rear brakes on the Prius v (wagon). The biggest difference from the liftback is the fact that the Prius v (wagon) rear brakes are disc brakes (obviously) with a drum emergency brake. This appears to be a source of confusion when searching around here. In theory, doing the rear brakes on a Prius v (wagon) should be just about the same as the front brakes ( i.e. - no 'Disc Brake cube Piston Tool' needed ).
     
    #53 farmecologist, Apr 30, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2018
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  14. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Here is a diagram of the Prius v (wagon) rear brakes and drum emergency brake (in red) : Prius_v_Rear_Brakes.jpg
     
  15. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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    Yeah I've caught on to that. Maybe mini-drum parking brake is less problematic? Our daughter's Pilot is like that; I've yet to have a look at it.

    Regarding brake service interval, the brakes should not just be opened up to replace pads (and/or rotors). In depth inspection, with the caliper pulled off, pads cleaned and relubed, caliper pins relubed, should be done on a regular miles/months interval. Also, if there's any pulsing or the car's getting on, good to check rotor thickness and runout.

    Toyota's interval is pretty typical, but it seems like a lot of owners (and dealerships?) glaze-over, when reading the schedule: there's the (cursory) "visual" inspection, every 5000 miles or 6 months (in conjunction with tire rotation), but every 30K miles (or 36 months) you'll see they change the language, though it's very subtle, especially in the US (non graph) format, easy to overlook.
     
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  16. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Since I know that most of the regulars here have done brakes before...I have a question I forgot to ask above.

    This involves the "Toyota Brake Shims". It looks to me like this includes an outermost chrome-plated shim ( the one you can see ) and an inner "anti squeal" shim. You can see what I mean via the link below...this set is supposed to fit my Prius v (wagon) :

    Toyota Corolla, Rav4 04945-12111 Disc Brake Pad Shim | eBay

    Here is a pic in case the link becomes defunct :
    Brake_Shims.jpg

    In my case these shims were in really rough shape...inner (black) shim was corroded and the outer (chrome) shim was not as bad but was starting to rust in a couple spots. I only reused the outer chrome shim when I did the brake job. Brakes seem to operate just fine without it but I do want to go back in there and do the proper thing ( once I know what that is ). I'm assuming the answer will be to use both shims. :D

    Anyway, I went ahead and ordered the replacement shim set above and just want to know I am on the correct track? Also, a thin coat of anti-seize goes between the back of the pad and the shim..correct? That is how I have it now ( remember I am currently only using the outermost chrome shim ). When I get the new set...do I use anti-seize between both shims?

    Thanks for your help! ( and go easy on me...this is my first brake job )! (y)
     
    #56 farmecologist, May 2, 2018
    Last edited: May 2, 2018
  17. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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    When I first disassembled our Prius brake pads, I seem to recall there was very little lube on the backs of pads, or on the shims. There was a very small "dab" of a vaseline-like grease, in the middle between outer and inner shims, and/or inner shim and pad back. Something like that. It was maybe something similar, the Toyota equivalent, to Sil-Glyde Brake Lubricant. That said, what I've done since, this is a throwback to my Honda years, and seems to work fine:

    1. Clean all pads and shims, the contact points of the caliper "fingers", and the caliper piston front face.
    2. Place pad friction surface down on clean newspaper.
    3. Pick up the inner shim, lightly coat its inside face with anti-seize lubricant*, and install on back of pad.
    4. Pick up the outer shim, lightly coat its inside face with anti-seize lubricant, and install on back of shim/pad.
    5. Lightly coat the contact points of the caliper "fingers" and caliper piston front face, with anti-seize lubricant.

    * I've been using Permatex:

    Permatex® Anti-Seize Lubricant - Permatex
     
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  18. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Thx for the reply! That is exactly the info I was looking for and will use both Toyota shims when the new set arrives.

    I will also follow your anti-seize procedure. Looks like I also forgot to use anti-seize on the piston front face and caliper 'fingers'. ( also BTW...I used the copper-based 3M anti seize ).

    Looks like there are a lot of 'opinions' (or oversights) out there though. The odd thing is...most Prius brake job videos out there make absolutely no use of any Toyota shims. Strange...o_O possibly they just overlooked this detail? Another reason may be that most aftermarket pads come with a metal backing 'shim'(?) already on them. Maybe they think the Toyota shims are unnecessary in that case?
     
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  19. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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    Whenever I got a brake job done at a Honda dealership, years back, out of curiosity I would look at the brakes when I picked the car up. They sometimes used the silver, sometimes copper anti-seize, and you could see it slightly squeezing out at all points of contact, basically all the "faying" surfaces. If you follow that, all points of contact between separate pieces, I think you can't go wrong. And to get the coverage just where needed, apply the lube to the smaller of the two items.

    The one exception I make, is the the two lobes at top and bottom extremes of a brake pad, where they push into the anti-rattle clips on the caliper mounting bracket. I'm always leery about putting lube on those tips, because it's so close to the rotor face. Never had a problem.
     
  20. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Rear brakes are now 'done' ( well..at least functional ). As usual rust and dirt were a huge problem.

    Here is the condition of one of the rotors and the 'mini drum parking brake' after I cracked the rotor off :
    IMG_5345.jpg IMG_5346.jpg

    The other rear brake was in similar condition. Needless to say...I ordered a new parking brake kit. :eek: However, I was able to restore the current parking brake parts into somewhat serviceable shape by giving them an 'acid bath' in white vinegar. It worked surprisingly well! ( unfortunately, I forgot to take a picture ).

    One of the calipers had a completely rusted out caliper pin/socket ( the caliper pin boot was compromised..which was obviously the cause of the problem ). Luckily, the auto parts store was able to 'overnight' a caliper pin kit and caliper boot kit for me. The caliper pin socket took quite a while to bring back to serviceable shape..but works fine now.
    IMG_5347.jpg

    Here is the finished product ( for now ). I'll have to crack it back open again when I receive the 'mini drum' parking brake kit. While I'm in there I'm also going to redo the brake pad shims ( I also have a shim kit on the way ).
    IMG_5356.jpg IMG_5354.jpg

    One odd scare when I started the car back up. I had done the proper procedure of disconnecting the 12V battery and then pumping the brakes before re-connecting the battery. However, when I started it up I was getting the ABS warning light. :eek: I pumped the brakes a few more times while the car was on...turned the car off...and turned it on again and everything was good. Pretty strange but it seems to be working great now.

    I finally got around to snapping a couple photos of the Clazzio PVC seat covers I installed a few weeks ago. Very nice! However, the pics don't do them justice at all.
    IMG_5348.jpg IMG_5352.jpg

    Next up is to do the rear shocks. I'm only doing them because they look super easy to replace. Literally a 30 minute job if you have access panels in the back ( which the Prius V does ).
     
    #60 farmecologist, May 6, 2018
    Last edited: May 6, 2018
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