Horn out. $875 quoted from dealer for clock spring replacement. Alternative suggestions?

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by G Man v5, Sep 20, 2021.

  1. G Man v5

    G Man v5 Member

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    Horn still works with panic button. All other steering wheel functions work too. I've read mixed reviews on replacing with aftermarket part. And not willing to spend $625 on OEM.

    So, has anyone just wired up a button with a relay to the horn? Or add a new horn? If so, please let me know how you did it! I really could use a horn.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    MIght be this item:

    CABLE SUB-ASSY, SPIRAL
    Genuine Toyota, Genuine Daihatsu (8430774020)

    Shows as under $300 CDN (all-in, no extra taxes) for me, through Amayama. Located on this page:

    Switch & relay & computer for Toyota Prius a 1 generation 05.2011 - 10.2014 - Toyota Car & Auto Spare Parts - Genuine Online Car Parts Catalogue - Amayama

    And detail here:

    Buy Genuine Toyota 8430774020 (84307-74020) Cable Sub-Assy, Spiral. Prices, fast shipping, photos, weight - Amayama

    If it's a similar deal to your address, you can order the part and have it shipped 'round the world from United Arab Emirates, for significantly less than half what the dealership is asking, around $240 USD.

    I've used these guys 3 or 4 tiimes. Takes a week or two, but never any problems.
     
    #2 Mendel Leisk, Sep 20, 2021
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2021
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  3. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    If you wanted to wire up a button, you could just use it to ground the same wire that goes to the clockspring for the horn circuit, no need to add any additional relays or wiring.

    Probably only a matter of time though before your other steering wheel controls or air bag go dodgy.
     
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  4. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    #4 TMR-JWAP, Sep 20, 2021
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2021
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  5. Rebound

    Rebound Senior Member

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    Advice One: Do this with the negative terminal of the 12V battery disconnected. You don’t want to trigger the airbag when you disconnect/reconnect it.

    Advice Two: Get the part from a wrecking yard. Preferably, one they lets you remove the part yourself. That will give you practice before you do your own car.

    Advice Three: Replace it yourself. I replaced my steering wheel myself once. Not difficult. Does take a big socket, like 26mm-ish. Only tricky part: Do not turn wheels after steering wheel is removed. You want to be sure the wheels are straight and the wheel is exactly perfect 12:00. Keep it that way when you put the steering wheel back on. It’s not THAT critical; you won’t break anything, but when you replace the steering wheel, before you torque down the Big Nut, turn it and make sure the wheels are straight at 12:00, or else you get to do it over again.
     
  6. G Man v5

    G Man v5 Member

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    I"m going for option three. Ordered an aftermarket piece for about $20.00. If it doesn't work, no big deal, I'll then order an OEM or find something else. Can't believe how much Toyota charges for such a simple part.
     
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  7. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    Also, if you find you did not set it down exactly at 12:00, lift it lightly toward you and turn it very gently, try to feel where it can be set back down in its original position on the column shaft splines. Don't allow it any rotation on the shaft while you are tightening the nut.

    The splines that join the wheel to the column shaft are very fine, and you can more or less grind them smooth by turning the wheel while they are in contact. That can mean getting to do it over again with new parts.
     
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  8. G Man v5

    G Man v5 Member

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    Just wondering how would someone be able to turn the wheels with the steering wheel removed?
     
  9. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    Pretty easy to do if the car's on a lift and somebody pushes or pulls on a wheel; harder to do if the car's on the ground, but be careful about pushing it around.
     
  10. Rebound

    Rebound Senior Member

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    It’s not so much turning the wheels, but turning the shaft at all. It’s not THAT big a deal, except that your steering wheel will be tilted right or left when you’re driving straight. Just be mindful of this, that’s the thing.

    Remember, you’re working on the steering wheel and a large nut on the splined shaft, so it’s going to move while you’re working on it. When you pull the wheel, maybe it will slide right off and maybe you’ll need to use some force, and if you’re pulling hard, it’s difficult not to turn the wheel, and then it breaks loose, and you don’t know if it was turned left or right.

    I’m guessing you’ve never done this. Easy in theory, a little trickier in practice. Since it’s a drive by wire system, I think there’s a way that you can recalibrate it without pulling the wheel, but I don’t know how.
     
  11. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    A steering wheel puller.

    Once you have removed the airbag and the nut on the column shaft, you'll see that the steering wheel has two threaded holes in it, on either side of the column shaft.

    Using two of the M8 x 1.25 bolts in the puller set, you thread them through the puller into the wheel's threaded holes. (It comes with different sized bolts and maybe hooks or what not, so it can work with a variety of cars.)

    Then with a wrench, you slowly tighten the big bolt in the center, which will push straight down on the steering shaft, and pull the wheel straight off. Usually it will resist for a bit, and then come loose with a pop.

    This pulls it straight off without damaging the splines in the wheel or on the column shaft.

    Sometimes you read about (or watch on youtube) somebody who just takes the center nut off and just grabs and jerks and yanks on the steering wheel until it comes loose. You might get away with it. You just have to ask yourself one question.

    [​IMG]
     
    #11 ChapmanF, Sep 21, 2021
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2021
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  12. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    I've pulled about a dozen Gen 2 steering wheels in salvage yards. I used a puller on the very first one. The rest I did just by wiggling and pulling, so it can be done if needed. Puller is much safer and gentler because wiggling and pulling can snatch on wires if you're not careful.

    And here's another idea. After you remove the nut, you can mark the shaft and the wheel to help with alignment.
     
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  13. burrito

    burrito Member

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    In a car, "turn the wheel" can mean 2 things:
    1. Turn the steering wheel right or left, or
    2. Lift the car off the ground and use your hands (instead of the engine) to turn one of the 4 wheels which have tires on them.
    In this case, they're referring to #2.
     
  14. G Man v5

    G Man v5 Member

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    Well ordered an aftermarket part off of eBay for $16.75. Installed it today in less than an hour. Removed the angle sensor from the OEM part snapped it back in place hooked it up and all is good! I sure missed honking at people.
     
  15. Krall

    Krall Junior Member

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    lol I was going to say how often do you actually use the horn? People these days don't even stop at traffic lights.
     
  16. Rebound

    Rebound Senior Member

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    Wow! You went from an $875 dealer repair to a $16.75 DIY! That is fantastic!
     
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  17. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    Don't start doing that long division until we hear how long the $16.75 one lasts. There have been disappointments reported in other threads.
     
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