Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid fails to offer at a lower price what Toyota Prius offers

Discussion in 'Hyundai/Kia/Genesis Hybrids and EVs' started by Gokhan, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. Gokhan

    Gokhan Active Member

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    Looking at the specifications of Hyundai Ioniq, it's very disappointing. You can't get the modern safety features in the base high-MPG "Blue" version, and if you want to get these in the higher SEL and Limited versions, you need to get optional packages. Prius offers these modern safety features in every version.

    The only thing nice about the Ioniq is Android Auto/Apple CarPlay but that's about it. You are getting much more car with the Prius.

    2017 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid - Specs & Trim | Hyundai
     
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  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    it would be nice to see a matrix of ionique and prius models with all standard and optional equipment.
     
  3. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    Choice is good for the consumer.

    Making TSS-P standard is good marketing for Toyota, but not every car buyer feels that they need it. For them, the Ioniq Blue is nearly $2500 cheaper than the Prius 2, and they didn't have to pay extra, like with the 2 Eco, to get the most fuel efficient trim.

    The Ioniq SEL with the package to get the TSS-P like features ends up the same price as the base Prius, maybe a little higher. The SEL gets blind spot and cross traffic alerts, even with out the package. That is not included in TSS-P, and you have to get a Prius 4 for them at a $6000 price difference.
     
  4. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    Yep, making TSS-P standard equipment on all trim levels was a great move by Toyota. Seems they must have had some intel on Hyundai and reacted to it. Also seems like a win for Toyota as far as manufacturing efficiencies, etc....

    On the other hand, some clever marketing by Hyundai regarding the Ioniq Blue. They can advertise the 'lowest MSRP'...but with an obviously inferior model.

    Another thing I'm interested is the average final cost of the Prius vs. Ioniq. Hyundai vehicles are typically discounted aggressively. I'm wondering if this will continue with the Ioniq.
     
  5. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    of course. that's really all that matters. toyota can be aggressive as well, but maybe not as consistently?
     
  6. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    Inferior is in the eye of the buyer. A friend and wife once looked at the Outback to replace their aging Tahoe. If you can't afford a Tesla, Subaru's Eyesight is the best driving aid system out there, but we was leery of these new driving aids, and didn't want to pay for it if they just ended turning them off.

    It may not seem like you are paying for these aids on a Prius, but I suspect many would opt to not get them if it saved them a couple thousand on the new car price.

    Another thread brought up this thought, how does Hyundai's driver aid system compares to TSS-P? That will effect how a buyer views paying "extra" for it. We already know the similar equipped Ioniq has a blind spot and cross traffic alert advantage.
     
    #6 Trollbait, Mar 3, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
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  7. Gokhan

    Gokhan Active Member

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    I disagree that AEB (automatic emergency braking) should be considered as a cost-increasing redundant feature for some drivers. It will be mandatory for all cars in 2022 and many will probably come standard with it long before then. Omitting AEB is no different than omitting antilock brakes or airbags.
     
  8. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    2022 is five long years away. For those that don't want want the extra safety features until then, they don't have to pay for them. For those that do, the Ioniq's MSRP is less than $300 higher than the Prius Two. Not only do they get the automatic braking, but also all the SEL upgrades over the Blue. The heated front seats with power adjustable driver's requires going to a Four to get on a Prius.

    The Ioniq is a competitive car to the Prius. The Blue doesn't have everything standard that a Two does, but it is $2000* cheaper, which is a good chunk at this price range. The SEL w/ Tech Package will add most of those Prius standard features for nearly the same price, plus some only available on the Four, which is approaching $30k.

    *I swore it was nearly $2500, and it is according other sections of Toyota's page. $24,685 sans delivery on the front Prius page, and $24,200 on the specs page. Was it always that way?
    2017 Toyota Prius Hybrid Car | Take everyone by surprise.
    2017 Toyota Prius MPG & Price
     
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  9. Rmay635703

    Rmay635703 Senior Member

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    I disagree airbags are Avery different animal.

    AEB is unnecessary for those who can drive

    Just as...
    Antilock brakes can make it difficult to stop on mixed glare ice where no ABS would stop faster.

    If you are going to hit something only the air bags might affect the outcome
     
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  10. Vike

    Vike Active Member

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    Given how close the list prices came out, I've wondered the same thing, although as far as I can tell Toyota dealers have been selling the Prius at attractive discounts. Toyota has strong incentives to push the Prius so that they can sell more higher-margin lower-mpg Highlanders, 4Runners, Avalons, etc. - given the mix in the Hyundai/Kia fleet I see on the road, I'm not sure H/K is similarly motivated. This picture should be clearer by the end of the summer, when we have more purchase price reports to build up the standard references. We should keep in mind that most incentives aren't as visible as broadly advertised rebate programs, so out-the-door prices are the only meaningful guide as to what's really going on.
     
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  11. Vike

    Vike Active Member

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    I think you need to side-by-side the Prius Three or Four w/the Ioniq SEL. I've sat in both to get a feel for the non-dynamic part of the experience (since one doesn't see Ioniq reviewers using terms like "sporty", "hushed", or "floats over road imperfections", I think it's safe to say the Ioniq doesn't have any great edge in the over-the-road driving experience, especially given the huge improvements that came with the Gen4). I have to say the Ioniq comes across as a cheaper car in every respect but the mobile integration tech mysteriously missing from the Prius (i.e., no CarPlay or AndrAuto, features now standard or readily available on even humble mobility pods like Mirage, Fit, or Sonic). That tech quirk aside, the Prius Three/Four is just the more impressive and agreeable car, and I don't think the uneven appeal of its unconventional styling is enough to tip the balance much in Hyundai's favor for most buyers (it actually goes the other way for buyers like myself who generally like the Gen4's looks).

    While I think the high end picture strongly favors the Prius for all but those who highly value smartphone integration (and even there, Entune, pathetic as it may be, is certainly better than nothing), things are different at the low end. The Ioniq Blue offers a solid value with maximum MPG at a price that's meaningfully lower than the Prius Two (or even the One, which I just learned about when comparison shopping today, though I suspect that you will never find more one of those on a lot - there are none in my state), especially when you factor in the aforementioned smartphone integration and a Sat/HD radio package you can't get in a Prius without upgrading to a Three.

    And here's the kicker - to beat the Ioniq Blue on price with a Toyota hybrid, you'd have to move to a Prius c, the most wretched car I've bothered to test drive in the past five years (and keep in mind I test drove a Scion iQ the same day). I would gladly pay more than $1200 to swap out a Prius c Two for an Ioniq Blue, but that's all the difference there is.

    So, all things being equal (i.e., you don't live next door to a Hyundai dealer or have a sibling working there or become physically ill at the sight of Priusesque origami sheetmetal), while I really couldn't see getting a top of the line Ioniq over a Prius Three, I think an Ioniq Blue is a very strong alternative to a Prius Two or Prius c Two (or even a hypothetical Prius One).
     
  12. farmecologist

    farmecologist Senior Member

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    I think Toyota is onto the fact that the Ioniq Blue can come out ahead on price. Looks like they are introducing the "Prius One" model to better compete with the Ioniq Blue :

    Check this article out :

    Toyota Prius One gets a price cut with arrival of Hyundai Ioniq - NY Daily News
     
  13. Vike

    Vike Active Member

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    I think the article rather misses the point (as harried journalists often do) - the One is a new trim level, not a price reduction. Since the Ioniq Blue is already better equipped than a Prius Two (apart from TSS-P), I can't see where the One really improves the Prius value proposition when it deletes the spare tire, rear window wiper, and seat back pockets.

    Still, given the Prius record of excellence, it's not like the Gen4 Prius seems outrageously overpriced. I would just argue that a low-end Ioniq is at least worth a look if one is considering the Prius c (the Ioniq is way more car for not much more money), and for many buyers it won't look bad even next to a Prius Two.

    While styling isn't a major driver for me (I drive an i-MiEV, for Pete's sake), the Ioniq's sleekish blandness seems (dare I say it) downright Toyota-like in its determination not to offend, and that may tip a few of the less reputation-sensitive buyers into the Ioniq camp. After all, not everybody wants to go down the road sporting a pulsing electric sign announcing "Hey look at me - I'm driving a hybrid!" For such attention-avoiders, the Ioniq's generic "sporty hatchback" look is a strong plus.
     
    #13 Vike, May 8, 2017
    Last edited: May 8, 2017
  14. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    What you are listing as advantages for the Prius are ones that are subjective. They could sway a buyer one way or the other, but they don't set a hard requirement like advanced safety systems nor power seats. Then the Ioniq SEL is $2000 to $6000 is cheaper than the Prius Three to Four Touring. That can sway a lot of subjective observations of the car.

    The top of the line Ioniq Limited starts between the Three and Four, and I don't see it adding much to the SEL to be worth it alone. The main features were leather, sunroof, and Hyundai's telemetrics system for three years. It could improve the subjective feel of the interior for some. The optional package adds a lot of goodies to make it comparable to the Four Touring it matches in price.

    The only new cars I have bought in the past 20 years were a Sonic, a Ranger, and a gen2 Prius. If I am going to spend $30k plus on a new car, it is going to have a plug. So I don't have much of an opinion on the Ioniq Limited or Prius Four.

    The Ioniq SEL with the safety package is less than a $300 more than the Prius Two, and still has some features that require upgrading to a Four in order to get in a Prius. The blind spot monitor and cross traffic alert plus power driver's seat with heated fronts aren't minor features. Perhaps the Ioniq looks blander or cheaper to the buyer, but it is hard to argue with paying $4000 less for something they really want in a car.

    The Prius One was likely available for fleet purchase. The TSS-P and Toyota name will help reduce lost sales to the Ioniq. I thought Toyota was also bringing the blind spot and cross traffic systems to lower trims too, but that hasn't appeared on their site.
     
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