I'm in it now - Front wheel bearing/hub replacement

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by perfectspeed, Aug 18, 2009.

  1. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    Any nearby neighbour's? :ROFLMAO:
     
  2. uagent

    uagent Junior Member

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    lol nope! that's why I love it out in BFE, PA :D
     
  3. jadziasman

    jadziasman Prius owner emeritus

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    Wow! It's been a really long time since I've seen or heard BFE being used. A staple of 80s slang. Now so politically incorrect it's toxic.
     
  4. SaganGathering

    SaganGathering New Member

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    I wasted week running around the city searching for the mythical "13 point socket". What a waste of time! GRRRR. I chased down a Snap-On truck and the guy assured me there is no such thing. So after wasting hours and gas, I got a 12 point socket which fit fine, just like the Snap-On guy said. The video needs addendums overlaid to correct that "13 pt" nonsense. Happily, YouTube has tools to do this.

    It makes me not trust the Torque values listed in that video. One typo on a Torque # can mean a bearing failure in 2 years.

    The video starts off strong, offering very good advice, a valuable tool listing, etc. It talks about the (very real) problem of tutorials that make use of terms and part-names while forgetting that noobs don't know what they are.

    But then video (ironically enough) does some of that- referring to parts that were never identified . And there's no video of the actual repair in progress, just stills. :-( And part names are used but never identified IN the stills. For all things there is a first time, and bearing noobs like me don't know what a lot of these things are called. (I understand it's a hassle to shoot vid during a repair, but then too, it is a YouTube repair video.)

    This could be the ultimate Prius bearing repair video if there were addendums with part names pointed to in the stills. YouTube does allow for adding text over video after uploading.
     
    #144 SaganGathering, Sep 9, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
  5. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    #145 Mendel Leisk, Sep 9, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
  6. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    Strategic delegation is a totally legitimate part of DIYing. :) There's no rule saying you have to do every part of the job, if there are parts you can pay somebody to do better and faster.

    I like to delegate the parts that (a) I don't like, or don't want to buy the specialized tools for, and (b) I can easily confirm were done right by whoever I delegated to. Like brake rotor turning, easy enough to look at it after and say "yup, that's been turned."

    Back when I had a truck that needed tranny and transfer case rebuilds, I took them out of the truck, then dropped them off at a local tranny shop for disassembly. They dealt with the stubborn rusted threads and gunky old fluid, I came back and picked up boxes of cleaned parts. I did the inspection and part replacement and reassembly myself, since there isn't any way to look at the closed-up tranny and be sure how carefully the assembly was done.

    -Chap
     
  7. SaganGathering

    SaganGathering New Member

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    The whiteboard diagram (I am trying to upload below) shows 81 ft-lbs for the calipers. However 101 ft-lbs is specified at your link above.

    Any idea what that's all about? Helllllllllp!
     

    Attached Files:

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  8. SaganGathering

    SaganGathering New Member

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    I have been able to sort out varying bits of conflicting torque information (this can lead to premature bearing death). However as this 3-source image shows, the tie-rod torque info is confusing or contradicting. Can anyone clarify? Critical questions in red text.

    (I could not seem to upload an image; instead it's an attachment:)
    View attachment 116971


    Further, the white/left section of the above diagram shows 81 ft-lbs for the calipers. However 101 ft-lbs is specified at:
    https://techinfo.toyota.com/t3Portal/document/rm/RM07X0U/xhtml/RM00000212Q002X.html?sisuffix=ff&locale=en&siid=1470899190520

    Which is it? This noob needs HELLLLP!!
     
  9. specialtyneed

    specialtyneed Junior Member

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  10. specialtyneed

    specialtyneed Junior Member

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  11. SaganGathering

    SaganGathering New Member

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    This looks like it's Gen 1 (2003) and Gen 3. I have a 2008 so that's Gen 2.x.
     
  12. specialtyneed

    specialtyneed Junior Member

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    Could not remember what all was on that site. There is very little different on the suspension if any in Gen 1 through Gen 2 except the softer struts and coil springs on the 06-09. Someone more expert in Gen 1 please correct me if I am wrong here.

    Sent by a right hand on a mobile with Tapatalk
     
  13. Albert Rozsalyi

    Albert Rozsalyi Junior Member

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    I replaced mine over the weekend on both side on a 2008 with 165,000 km (102,000 miles). The car was driven in the "snow belt" :(
    It still had the originals made by Koyo on it. I bought the same Koyo made bearings to replace.
    The left side came off with a puller but the right side was really bad so I had to use a dremel to cut the outside wall of the bearing to release the pressure against the wall of the hub (over 1 hour to cut the stainless steel metal with the dremel - credits to the dremel disk manufacturer - I used one dremel disk and half way trough the second). I guess the right side gets more salt from the road :( so more corrosion. The two pieces were like welded together. Once I've cut a channel in the bearing, I hit it and I could make it turn a bit and I pulled it using it's own bolts.
    There was a lot of corrosion between the aluminum and the stainless steel on both sides. I had to clean a lot of corrosion, the white aluminum oxide which turned into white dust using the sand paper. By cleaning/eliminating all the oxide, the inside wall of the knuckle became larger :( .... the aluminum transformed into oxide ...
    For those who don't know what's going between the aluminum and the stainless steel there's a nice article that explains it:
    I can't post yet a link, search the page underhoodservice aluminum suspension components corrosion alert
    The pictures and posting on this forum helped me a lot. Thanks.
     
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  14. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    It's too bad they don't have a stainless steel sleeve on the car side of the interface. FWIW in the rear the car side is steel, but definitely not stainless, lots of reports that they are a bear to remove too.
     
  15. jessiejosco

    jessiejosco Member

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    I found that a large sledge hammer blasted the hub assembly out of the knuckle with a couple of blows. The hardest part was finding something to support the knuckle while you hit the bearing. I ended up sitting the knuckle over the hub of an old disk brake rotor and used a large socket a bit smaller than the hub to give me something to hit.
     
  16. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    Do use drift pins or similar, with the hammer? Eric the Car Guy had a perfect special tool for this. Around 1:40:

     
    #156 Mendel Leisk, Nov 1, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017
  17. eluo

    eluo Member

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    Just replaced my wheel bearing again. Bought the GMB brand and it failed in less than 1/2 year. I have replaced it under warranty with another GMB. I don't have high hope of this one lasting longer.

    I agree wth jessiejosco...
    The 2nd time around, I used 4 pieces of 2x6 and built a square frame big enough to fit the hub. I unscrewed the 4 bolts holding the hub assembly to the knuckle, few rotation at the time and started whacking at socket over the bolt with my BFH. It came out a lot faster compared to my first attempt. For those having trouble getting the two separated, try this method with heat applied to the knuckle as aluminum expands more than steel.

    Screen Shot 2018-02-19 at 8.55.25 PM.png
     
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  18. theclarinetguy32

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    In general, are folks satisfied with the Timken HA590064 hub assembly? I have seen them as low as $90 so far per.
    Needing to work on both left and right, but in trying to get parts lined up I want to make sure I'm heading in the right direction!
     
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  19. eluo

    eluo Member

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    If I were to do this over again, my top choice would be (based on online research of what people recommends)
    1. Koyo (Toyota OEM). Ebay sells a set for $214.95. Search for Koyo 43510 47010
    2. SKF. rockauto.com sells it for just under $100 (each)
    3. Timken. rockauto.com sells it about $10 less than SKF
    If warranty is of concern, SKF and Timken offer 3 years and rockauto is great with handling the warranty exchange.
     
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  20. valde3

    valde3 Senior Member

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    At least my SKF package bearings were exactly the same KOYO bearing as original Toyota. In the SKF box it reads actually reads “quality product manufactured or purchased by SKF”.

    So SKF should be better option as you can get the same product cheaper and with longer warranty (which you should not need).
     
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