IS THIS A DEALER HYBRID BATTERY CHARGER?

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Technical Discussion' started by Dacus_Malus, Jul 5, 2019.

  1. tvpierce

    tvpierce Senior Member

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    If you Google that Toyota part number, it appears to be at least part of a Prius Plug-In charger.

    Were Gen-1 or Gen-2 Prius offered as a plug-in model in markets outside North America?

    Edit: And it's a $1700 part! :eek:
     
  2. Dacus_Malus

    Dacus_Malus Junior Member

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    Maybe new is 1700$...
    In the picture bellow you see is 70$ (used part)
     

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  3. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Could you please open the charger up and take some pics of what's inside? In general, this is a valuable collector's item if you're into the history of hybrid cars. It shows that at the earliest stages of development 1/4 century ago Toyota was poised to offer a plug-in hybrid car, but decided to go the zero maintenance shorter battery pack lifespan route instead. I want to see what the step up transformers look like in there, or maybe that's the part that's missing? Or maybe it's just straight 220v AC input from a Japanese style wall outlet? Thoughts?
     
  4. JOLLIMON

    JOLLIMON New Member

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    Looks like Toyota may have reused the part number as it cross references to a charging sub assembly for 2012-2015 Plugin as well as Gen 1. Based on pictures out there it looks to be Gen 1, lots of pics from Russia, wonder if it is something that got installed to help compensate for winter temps in Eastern Block countries.
     
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  5. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Yes, that would be the most logical reason a 12v system would be used on a high voltage system... But can't really tell until we see what's inside.
     
  6. Dacus_Malus

    Dacus_Malus Junior Member

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  7. tvpierce

    tvpierce Senior Member

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    Of course. But the original price would indicate that it's something more sophisticated than a simple 12 volt battery charger. And the fact that it's labeled Ni-MH would certainly point toward a connection with the traction battery.
    Very interesting. Can't wait to learn more!
     
  8. Leadfoot J. McCoalroller

    Leadfoot J. McCoalroller Senior Member

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    Where would you get 220v in Japan? The whole country is 100v. 50hz in the east, 60hz in the west. As far as I know they only have one the one JIS C 8303 connector, near clone of USA NEMA 15. Correction, I did find reference to a 200v standard used in Japan. I haven't lived there so I don't know for sure, but I was under the impression that low availability of AC power was one of the reasons Toyota has historically de-prioritized plugin cars.

    It's a curious gizmo, this charger. Just a few thoughts to consider: Is it complete? Was the bracket there to hold it onto the other half of itself? (just challenging the assumption that it was meant to mount to the car.)

    Could this be the 12v portion of a compound device, and it's just there to provide 12v for the battery cooling fan, for example?

    Given that the car uses a 12v system for command and control of the high voltage system, perhaps this was to provide stable 12v power for benchtop work, away from the car?
     
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