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Just finished replacing Inverter coolant pump.

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by Primetime Paul, Sep 4, 2023.

  1. Primetime Paul

    Primetime Paul New Member

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    Hey All,
    Just finished replacing the inverter coolant pump on my 06 with 210k. I bought the car about less than a month ago and I have all of the service records from the dealer but it doesn't have records for the pump or the fluid replacement. I bought a new pump from Toyota for $129+ tax and 5 gallons of fluid.
    I went with the Driver Headlight removal process and this is definitely the way to go, I saw some videos of unbolting the inverter and placing a block of wood under to weasel out the pump. the headlight method is the way to go.

    After removing the headlight, the pump is right there front and center. What I did was Remove the 3 bolts holding the pump to the bracket and just replaced the pump leaving the old bracket behind it's fine.
    I drained the coolant from below and only a few drops of coolant spilled when swapping in the new unit, very easy, filled, bled and test drove all ok! Glad I changed the coolant, the drain plug had a bunch of chalky pink substance in the recess. I'll probably do another coolant drain and fill soon.
    My old pump is good and functional I just wanted to replace it as a precaution.
    if anyone local is in a bind and needs a good pump, just let me know and its yours I'm Located in San Diego.

    While I was in there:
    Changed 4 spark plugs,
    Air filter

    Still need to do:
    PCV and transaxle fluid but decided to do it another day.
    Clean engine compartment If anyone has a good method let me know, I typically just cover the fuse box and alternator and spray S100 or Simple Green and low pressure wash, but have never cleaned a Hybrid, I'll have to find a way to cover the inverter.
     

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  2. Tombukt2

    Tombukt2 Senior Member

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    Dang I usually just use a long extension 1/4-in drive the 10 mm socket that's always lost and take the pump not the bracket undo the two squeeze clamps plug them with a 3/4 rubber cone unplugged the pump pull it straight up doesn't have to clear anything.looks good ...
     
    Primetime Paul likes this.
  3. theory816

    theory816 Junior Member

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    Doesn't make sense to replace it if it doesn't need to be replaced(yet)
     
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  4. mr_guy_mann

    mr_guy_mann Senior Member

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    All depends on your risk tolerance.

    If (when) the inverter pump dies then it either stops pumping and the car shuts off slowly (overheat with P0A93) or it pops the AM2 fuse and the car shuts off immediately.

    I changed out out the pump on my 2006 with a new one from the dealer shortly after I got the car. Should be ok for another 100k.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  5. theory816

    theory816 Junior Member

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    For me, something like the pump has to fail before I replace it because its a work or not work part(and theres no way to test if it works at half power). So for me there isn't anything in between. With anything else, I usually replace it before failure.
     
  6. Tombukt2

    Tombukt2 Senior Member

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    Well then you've owned a lot of these cars and you have a good idea of about when it fails or you're just flying in the breeze waiting. I'm just flying in the breeze waiting I have the spare parts right here in house so it can break now and can be fixed in 40 minutes generally speaking so there's no worry that's why I keep spare cars and parts around so that I don't have to run down to AutoZone and place an order or to the Toyota dealer every time something happens.
     
  7. MCCOHENS

    MCCOHENS Member

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    The pump is a known failure item at this age/mileage. I had a mantra years ago that still applies: better to fix something on my schedule than the car's schedule. Just my opinion.
     
  8. mr_guy_mann

    mr_guy_mann Senior Member

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    Yep. Can't say I have had anything automotive breakdown "at a convenient time and place".

    Same reason why I replace the 12V battery at 5 years - period.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  9. pasadena_commut

    pasadena_commut Senior Member

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    Proactively changing the pump at a convenient time after maybe 60k miles is not an unreasonable policy. An OEM pump might get to 80k, but it probably won't make it to 100k, and a failed inverter pump could easily strand a car. It never did in our car, but ours never blew the fuse, and the failures were near home, so it was possible to let it cool off and limp home at low speed. Anyway, "wasting" 1/4 of a pump's potential lifetime (~$160 x .25 = $40) isn't much of an expense compared to the inconvenience of being stuck on the side of a highway miles from home.
     
    SFO likes this.