looking to buy for prius v - Seattle

Discussion in 'Prius v Main Forum' started by santhosh, Mar 16, 2018.

  1. santhosh

    santhosh New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2018
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    Location:
    CA
    Vehicle:
    2014 Prius v wagon
    Model:
    V


    I am new to this forum and looking to buy a used 2014ish Prius V. I am married and we are expecting a baby next month :). I am really impressed with Prius V's cargo space, roomy space and best in class mpg. I was also looking for CR-V but nothing comes closer to what Prius offers in mpg.
    I learnt that Toyota discontinued Prius V model. Is it worth still to spend 16K for 2014 Prius V? Will this be a problem in long term such as in service, resale values et al. Will you recommend to go for 2012 instead of 2014? Is it advisable to buy certified vs Used Prius V
    I'll be moving to Seattle in couple of months. I have been reading a lot about how mileage drops in winter climates. Can any one the real world mileage you get for Prius V in hilly, rainy areas. Is it still worth to go for a hybrid when the mileage drops?
    I have been confused in making a decision here. I am in situation to go for a wagon or crossover because of the new arrival we expect. Also, I would like to save some money for us by opting for Prius through gas. Toyota's decision to discontinue has added to my confusion. I got introduced into this column a week back and I really hope you Prius experts can let me know what it is


    Thanks
     
  2. rjparker

    rjparker Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2008
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    843
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    Location:
    Texas Hill Country
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius v wagon
    Model:
    Three
    You can still get 40-42 mpg in hilly rainy moderately cold climates. Toyota is only discontinuing the car in the US, they are still selling it in Canada and Europe. In the US they have been pushing the RAV4 hybrid; more profit for them even though it is less mpg. In 2017 you could hardly find a Prius v on the Toyota lot. I would get a 2014 or newer if you buy the v; the 2012's did have a problem in their crash test that was fixed later. Other than that the car is very similar to all the other Gen 3 Prius' vehicles out there. Don't buy something with more than 100,000 miles and don't overpay. Any car except perhaps a Tesla will lose value over time. The old rule of thumb used to be 50% every three years. Obviously, a Prius may do slightly better than that if they can get $16k for a 2014. Again mileage is a big factor. Three or four years from now that car will be selling for $8k. One thing to consider is the new 2019 Rav4 Hybrid and 2019 Honda CRV Hybrids, both "compact SUVs", are extremely likely to have the same mpg or better than a Prius v. So if you want to wait and buy new next year, those cars may be a good option.
     
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  3. taxibuddy

    taxibuddy Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2018
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    Location:
    Atlanta
    Vehicle:
    2014 Prius v wagon
    Model:
    Two
    I wouldn't spend that much but everyone has their own comfortable price.
    A private party sale with maintenance records and CarFax check is another good option if money is important. Since you are in California you should be able to find a car with the longer hybrid system warranty and that's a huge deal on this car.
    Mileage is somewhat worse anytime it's cold enough to run the heater mainly because the traction battery has higher losses when its cold, but it's still far better than the CRV. Just because you own a Prius doesn't mean you have to obsess over fuel economy. I don't. Just drive. You'll be happier.
    When the kids are car seat age, nothing beats a powered sliding door.
    Maybe ask in the Honda Element forums how it has affected those owners since the Element was discontinued a few years back.
    Do you drive at least 10,000 miles per year? At least 12,000 is better. If you don't drive a lot, don't buy a Prius. Are you sure the regular Prius won't work for you? It gets much better fuel economy.
    I broke the 100,000 rule, but my 2014 was $3600. It cost me another $1000 to get it the I way I wanted it, but most of that wasn't strictly necessary. With so little in the car, I don't carry collision insurance which results in further savings. If it suffers a major breakdown or wreck, I should be able to get most of my money back out in parts. Besides there is nothing special about 100,000 except for being exceptionally round. So really the advice should be don't overpay based on mileage and condition.
    My boss has a Tesla which has depreciated despite its excellent condition. Traction batteries wear out and are expensive to replace so depreciation is expected.

    Your homework is to investigate the warranties on the car and especially the hybrid system warranty. The car has a lot of solid state components compared to a conventional car which increases reliability, but if you have to replace a traction battery or inverter on your own dime it's going to cost you.
     
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  4. santhosh

    santhosh New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2018
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    Location:
    CA
    Vehicle:
    2014 Prius v wagon
    Model:
    V
    @rjparker @taxibuddy Thanks for your replies. I have been busy last two days as I was with my friend helping him on a personal situation. Today, I test drive in two places. I tried Prius V and Rav4 hybrid. I satisfied with both. But, RAV looked like it gives more control to you and when we changed lanes on freeways we felt somewhat less shaky. Me and my wife were satisfied with prius, especially it's sliding rear seats. We are expecting a baby :) with that we think sliding rear seats can really be helpful.

    In the first dealership, the sales guy was always downgrading Prius and tried to sell RAV4 hybrid. When I mentioned to him that we are planning to move to seattle, he said we cannot rely on Prius on rainy climates as it's a front wheel drive. He said it's less safer to drive these FWD back there in hilly and rainy areas. He also priced a 2015 Prius with 37K miles at 21K. That is not certified one but he said I can buy Toyota protection, a platinum one, and they can share cost of it.

    In the second dealership, sales guy offered me two trims in 2015 models and they both are certified. For model trim 3, with 34K miles, he price it for $19K. For trim 2 with 41K miles, he offered that to me at $17K. The salesman here said if I am planning to buy Platinum protection, I must buy that when I buy the car from them. If not, let's say, If I go to them after a year when the certified 12 months gets over for a platinum protection, Toyota will charge around $4500 before they offer me the protection. What's the cot? He said that's going to be $36 every month for 7 years to buy that platinum protection.

    I know they are not quoting fair price. I saw couple of ads for 16K and 17K, need to check on them. My biggest concern os the safety issue that the first guy brought. Is anyone from Seattle, can answer that or from similar areas where it is as rainy and hilly.

    I am expecting a child this month, so am planning to buy when the child arrives. I checked on RAV4 hybrid, they don't have anything on used car slot, they have only new ones. The XLE comes at $30K excluding taxes. That's something that I can afford, moreover I do not want to pay for depreciation of car in it's first three years.

    Will Toyota offer it's protection plans on any used vehicle? If so, I don't have trouble buying from them.

    When I am in Seattle, I have to drive at least 30 miles to work and the traffic in Seattle is nasty. I checked on regular Prius, but we are comfortable with the space we have in V because of its cargo size and the room we have in rear ( Me, my wife, my child and my mother).

    QUOTE="taxibuddy, post: 2693859, member: 161596"]
    Your homework is to investigate the warranties on the car and especially the hybrid system warranty. The car has a lot of solid state components compared to a conventional car which increases reliability, but if you have to replace a traction battery or inverter on your own dime it's going to cost you.[/QUOTE]
    Thanks for this advice, this is what I did today in dealerships.
     
  5. rjparker

    rjparker Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2008
    2,045
    843
    1
    Location:
    Texas Hill Country
    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius v wagon
    Model:
    Three
    You are hearing pure BS from some of those salesmen. You don't have to buy an extended warranty to buy the car; I would talk to the dealer's manager and write everyone's name down with their quotes and let them know a letter is going to Toyota. In fact, the smart move is to not buy it, don't add it to your financing, limit the years of the loan, save big on interest.

    The v is great in rain and on hills and gets 30-40% better mileage than a Rav4. Look at my info on the left. Texas Hill Country. Many severe hills, some with curves driven at 70 mph and it is flash flood central here. I live up a private road that rises 300 ft in a half mile. No problems.

    Either car is fine but the v's are in limited supply. I REALLY would wait until the 2019's arrive; you might be sorry otherwise.

    Tires make a big difference on any car's handling and ride. Get Michelins when you need tires. They last me 90k-100k miles and are far superior to most factory tires.

    The Toyota extended warranty is available on a used car until it reaches 36 months or 36,000 miles. There are several lengths of extended warranty, but realize that every Toyota hydrid comes with a eight year, 100,000 mile factory hybrid warranty. Plus you will get 150k-200k miles on these cars without a problem. The taxi drivers sometimes get 300k-400k and "maybe" replace a battery and a few parts. I believe Taxibuddy bought his with high miles as an ex-taxi for low dollars and is still driving it around Atlanta with passengers.

    Over the pond in Europe, the Prius v is the preferred taxi, smooth and quiet, not belching exhaust into the passenger compartment and excellent on $6 a gallon gas. Just wait until we bomb somebody again and the gas prices skyrocket. Every hybrid will be gold again.

    The warranty costs the dealer around $1000, everything else is pure profit for them. Don't buy warranties when you buy the car unless it's within $200 of that number. Don't finance a warranty. You pay interest on it plus a big immediate profit for the dealer. You can buy it later. You really don't need the extended warranty and will probably hit 100,000 miles by the time the car is five or six years old anyway.
     
    #5 rjparker, Mar 19, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2018
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