Multiple Codes 2006 Prius

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Main Forum' started by Chuck D, Apr 11, 2021.

  1. Chuck D

    Chuck D New Member

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    My daughter's Prus with 175k just started acting up. During a 90 minute drive home from school. The warning light came on and the car entered the limp mode. I took it to my mechanic and there were 5 codes in the system. POA93, POA37, C1241, BB1241, B1442. He cleared the codes and performed a cycle drive with no codes returning. I am afraid to let her drive back to school so I let her drive my car. My question is since the inverter pump code is first on the list should I have it changed or should I wait till the warning light comes back on?
     
  2. mr_guy_mann

    mr_guy_mann Active Member

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    Why not check to see if the inverter coolant pump functions? Put the car in "Ready" mode but leave it in park. Open the hood and remove the cap on the inverter coolant tank- you should see very noticeable turbulence if the pump works.
    If it needs to be replaced, be sure to use a genuine Toyota part. Aftermarket parts (and some online Toyota counterfeits) are known to be of poor quality and reliability.
     
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  3. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    The P0A93 has 2 subcodes to point to whether the inverter temperature problem is likely due to a pump cooling flow problem or a fan air flow problem. Most often, it is the pump performance which causes the code.

    The car often be driven indefinitely at low speeds with no cooling problems even if the pump has failed, so this problem can hide until the car gets on the highway and then it doesn't take very long to hit temperature limits. Pumps can be inoperative for months before it's ever noticed if only local, low speed trips are most common for an owner. This could easily explain why your mechanic didn't see a problem. He didn't understand exactly what he's looking for. I've driven 30-40 miles in a gen 2 with the pump unplugged and staying below 45 mph.

    Unfortunately, many times these pumps eventually go into 'electrical meltdown failure' (for lack of a better term) and will cause an acrid burning smell in the car, and leading to blowing the AM2 fuse, which totally kills the car while driving. Many times, a failing pump will also be intermittent and may appear to have flow when you're looking in the reservoir.

    If you have the pump system subcode, just replace the pump. They're almost like a timing belt and should probably be replaced every 80k miles anyway. I keep 3 on the shelf ready to go, just like I keep oil, filters and coolant
     
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  4. Chuck D

    Chuck D New Member

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    Sounds like you have a lot of experience. How can I tell if I have subcodes or are those the ones I already have? I drove it a little tonight and obviously had no issues. You are spot on with the short trip not causing issues. I have an extensive CarFax ON THIS VEHICLE and don't recall the inverter pump being replaced. I'll check the reservoir the first chance I get but I'm still leaning on replacing it. What do you think??
     
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  5. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

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  6. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    Many codes will cause the car to save a ton of data at the instant the code is triggered. This is called freeze frame data. Depending on the scanner you're using (or Techstream) it may or may not have an option to see that freeze fame data. The subcode will be included in the freezeframe data.
     
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  7. landspeed

    landspeed Active Member

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    With the car cooled down (eg in the morning), switch it on. Remove the cap of the inverter coolant pump. Switch the car ‘on’. You will see turbulence, or at least some water flow. If the inverter coolant sits still, the problem is the pump.

    Phone Toyota if you want to get the pump - if there is no turbulence or water flow through the inverter coolant. It is a 12 volt electrical pump. $120 New Zealand from Toyota dealer!. They were sold on ‘TradeMe’ (NZ’s version of eBay - we don’t use that here!!), for twice the Toyota price.
     
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  8. Chuck D

    Chuck D New Member

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    Is there an after-market
    part??
     
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  9. Chuck D

    Chuck D New Member

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    My mechanic stated that there were about 15 different codes... I guess he just gave me the primary ones. He is going to look for an aftermarket part. He stated that the aggregating part is getting all the air out of the lines. He's a good mechanic who only sends me to the dealer when it's over his head or dealer only part that they won't warranty.
     
  10. landspeed

    landspeed Active Member

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    There are; in NZ they are found on eBay, imported using slow-mail from China, and are a little bit cheaper than genuine Toyota (which should be less than $100US as my two were $120NZ (for a Gen 1.5 NWH11) - aftermarket probably have a higher risk of random failure and great annoyance; I bought two from Toyota just in case :)
     
  11. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    I've done a handful of inverter cooling water pump replacements. Honestly, it's one of the easiest I've ever worked on to vent out the air bubbles, depending on how you replace the pump. I always remove the driver headlight and crimp the hoses using 2 hose clamps designed for that size hose. (medium if you buy the 3 pack of small, med, large for about $10). Then just swap the pump and you lose about 4 ounces of fluid. Connect a small rubber hose to the bleeder port and put the other end of the hose into the reservoir. Run the pump by putting car in IG-ON mode and crack open the bleeder. Squeeze the coolant hose a little to help shake things up and when the fluid stream from the bleeder hose is smooth (no air), let it run for a minute or so and then shut the bleeder. Turn off car, put tools away and go have a beer.
     
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