Need Advice / Recommendations for Hybrid Battery Replacement - What is the best option?

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by TPolo, Oct 26, 2021.

  1. TPolo

    TPolo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2021
    8
    0
    0
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Hi All,
    I need your advice/recommendations.


    I am the 3rd owner of a 2006 Prius with roughly 150,000 miles. My uncle recently sold me this car for a killer deal and wants me to keep it as a reliable and dependable car. However, it has been sitting outside for more than a year and I need to get it up and running again. My father is a mechanic and can help me out quite a bit, I also would like to replace the HV battery ourselves if possible.

    From what I've learned on this forum, the first thing I need to do is replace the 12v battery, HV battery, and a couple other things. I have not touched the car yet but I plan on doing so sometime next week. I wanted to get any advice from the more knowledgeable Prius owners.

    Called all my local Toyota dealers and they are wanting $1950 for the HV battery itself. Would this be the best option considering it is the OEM new HV battery? I've seen other sites and people who carry remanufactured & new batteries as well, like: Local Hybrid shops, GreenTec Auto, GreenBean, and member @2k1Toaster. Or is there a possibility I would be able to DIY and fix the HV battery for much cheaper rather than replacing it entirely?

    The local hybrid shop will install a new Toyota battery for around $2300. And others are all listed on their website.

    If I do decide to go with the new OEM Toyota HV battery, the warranty will only be a 1-year unlimited mile warranty. Is this long enough? Should I go a different route with a longer warranty?

    And as for the 12v battery, I'm just going to purchase the Toyota TrueStart battery from the dealer - $241 including core.

    So, if you were in my shoes, what would you do here?


    To-do list so far:

    - Replace 12v battery
    - Replace HV battery
    - Replace spark plugs?
    NGK BKR5EIX-11 Iridium IX
    - Siphon old gas and fill with new gas
    - Change oil
    - Mobil 1 High mileage 5W-30 + OEM Toyota filter
    - Change engine and inverter coolant - Toyota SLLC
    - Replace engine & cabin filter
     
  2. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2013
    15,020
    7,697
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Vehicle:
    2010 Prius
    Model:
    V
    If the car has been sitting for a year, you may not need to do much except a new 12v battery and possibly the HV battery (make sure it hasn't been changed). With gen2 cars from 2004-2009, many already have replacement HV batteries in them. Change the oil, check the tires/brakes and go for a drive. I wouldn't invest heavily into this car unless you've put at least 1000 reliable miles on it.
     
    SFO likes this.
  3. mr_guy_mann

    mr_guy_mann Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2020
    1,095
    449
    0
    Location:
    NJ-USA
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    Four
    That's a nice list. Somewhere along the line you want to inspect the brakes, change the brake fluid, change (drain an refill) the transmission fluid, clean the throttle body (TB) and mass airflow sensor (MAF). PCV valve and hose. Check the condition of the water pump belt and cooling hoses. Plan to replace the inverter coolant pump and the "three way valve" (for the Coolant Heat Storage tank) in the near future as both are common faults.

    Siphoning gas out of a Gen2 prius is almost impossible. It's about 4-1/2 feet from the gas cap to the actual fuel bladder in the tank- with several sharp bends, a step down in fill pipe diameter, and a one-way flapper valve to force open. Another option would be to safely raise and support the car, and disconnect the fuel pressure line at the right front corner of the tank. Connect an adapter (from a fuel pressure gauge set) and hose to the line fitting from the tank to go to a waste gas container. Then either use a scantool to command the pump on or remove the back seat bottom to access and jumper power to the pump connector at the tank.

    Might suggest you first replace the 12V, clean TB and MAF, check fluids and see what you have. Operate the 12V systems and see what functions. Connect a Prius compatible scantool and see what the systems report. See if the HV battery is dead or not before attempting to "ready" the car. You might (will) need a HV battery, but might want to find out as much as possible before spending $$$. (Would stink to put in a bunch of work and a new HV battery only to find that the brake accumulator assembly is bad or some such thing).

    A new Toyota HV battery (if correctly installed) should be fine for 10 years. You will want to understand Toyota's core return policy as I have read somewhere that they might reject the old battery under some circumstances. Another option is Newpriusbatteries.com. Be sure to fully read and follow installation instructions to the letter- esp torquing fasteners to spec.

    Before beginning you will want to get a copy of the factory service manual, as well as (use of) a capable scantool (snap on, some models of autel, or Techstream). Also consider getting a Bluetooth OBD2 adapter that will work with apps such as Dr Prius and Hybrid Assistant- both specifically monitor HV battery info (great to have "on the go" in your glove box).

    Once everything is up and going, there's the usual stuff on an older Gen2- tires, TPMS sensors, slow tire leaks due to rim corrosion, possible water leaks around the rear hatch, etc.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
    TPolo likes this.
  4. TPolo

    TPolo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2021
    8
    0
    0
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Appreciate the reply! You said I might not need to replace the HV battery? But from what I've learned about these batteries is that when they have sat and not been through their discharge and charge cycles frequently, they die. And I'll defintely be sure to check if the HV battery has been replaced before. How exactly can I tell if it has been replaced?

    And you brought up a good point, to do the minimum I can to get the car running and after 1000 miles or so, begin doing things that will prevent further problems. Will defintely do this go this route!
     
  5. TPolo

    TPolo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2021
    8
    0
    0
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Mods / Admins! I’m trying to reply to @mr_guy_mann but it is not allowing me because there is a link. However when I did delete the link, it still wouldn’t let me post the reply! Here’s the reply:


    Thanks for the reponse! I think you saved me some headaches with trying to siphon gas out of the prius, they are very different. I watched a video of someone using the fuel pump to get gas out of the tank. He basically connects a hose to a fuel valve in the engine bay and switches the ignition to ON position to get gas to come out and into the gas can. Do you know of another way that is easier or works just as good? The title to the video on YouTube is: "Prius FUEL pump bypass - how to drain gas" by John Caleb Warren.
    (can't post any links yet!)

    As for the battery situation, I hope the 12v will be the solution to getting the car running again. Instead of having to do the HV battery aswell. However, if it comes to that, I think the new battery from the dealer is the best option. Does Newpriusbatteries sell new genuine batteries or are they just remanufactured?

    I'll also be getting a Bluetooth OBD2 scanner. The only ones I've had are the classic wired ones but might need to get one that is compatiable with the Hybrid assistant apps.

    After the car is running again and I put a good reliable 1000 or so miles on it, I'll defintely be doing other key maintenance such as TPMS sensors, any leaks, transmission fluid, inverter coolant pump, water pump belt, cooling hoses, etc..
     
  6. sam spade 2

    sam spade 2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2018
    5,752
    2,286
    0
    Location:
    USA
    Vehicle:
    2017 Prius c
    Model:
    Four
    Maybe being a new member is causing a problem ????
    When you look at a message that he posted, is there NOT a "reply" box/button in the lower right corner of the screen ?

    The system may append an @ in some places but YOU should not.
     
  7. nancytheprius

    nancytheprius Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2020
    160
    46
    0
    Location:
    iowa
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    II
    TPolo likes this.
  8. jdenenberg

    jdenenberg EE Professor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    3,462
    1,528
    1
    Location:
    Trumbull, CT
    Vehicle:
    2020 Prius
    Model:
    LE AWD-e
    If the OP needs a copy of the Gen2 Maintenance Manual, he cam PM me and I will send him a link to the manual on my Web server. There are two versions; one for the 2004-2005 Gen2, and the other covers 2006-2009 Gen2. There are minor differences.

    JeffD
     
    Raytheeagle likes this.
  9. nancytheprius

    nancytheprius Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2020
    160
    46
    0
    Location:
    iowa
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    II
    would it be downloable as a pdf i assume? if so would you mind if i got the 2006 manual?
     
  10. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2013
    15,020
    7,697
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Vehicle:
    2010 Prius
    Model:
    V
    I don't think PMs can be sent on here, that seemed to have been disabled.

    Maybe just list your email and the professor will email you a copy
     
  11. jdenenberg

    jdenenberg EE Professor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    3,462
    1,528
    1
    Location:
    Trumbull, CT
    Vehicle:
    2020 Prius
    Model:
    LE AWD-e
    Nancy,

    I posted the link to the manual on your profile page. It is a large zip file containing many pdfs.

    JeffD
     
  12. TPolo

    TPolo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2021
    8
    0
    0
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Would you be able to post the links to both versions of the manuals to my profile page as well? Thanks!
     
  13. JC91006

    JC91006 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2013
    15,020
    7,697
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Vehicle:
    2010 Prius
    Model:
    V
    Just click the link on Nancy's page
     
    TPolo likes this.
  14. pasadena_commut

    pasadena_commut Active Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2019
    416
    133
    0
    Location:
    Southern California
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    There are three issues with your HV:
    • is there any charge left in it
    • is it out of balance
    • is it bad.

    Most NIMH batteries will have discharged to basically nothing if left unattended for a year. You will not be able to start the car with a dead HV battery and you do not want to try to start it with one which is nearly dead and out of balance, as it will reverse polarize some of the cells and damage them. There is one upside to a fully discharged battery - it is also fully balanced (all cells at the same state of charge).

    So at the very least you will need to find some way to charge the HV battery. The dealer can do that for you, but it will probably be expensive. You could buy a Prolong charger, but for $600 (something like that, last time I looked) that is a very significant fraction of the cost of a replacement HV battery. There may be a hybrid shop near you which would do this for not too much? If you want to do it yourself, open the battery case (safety switch first!), then you could pretty rapidly get it charged enough to start the car by putting 2A or so into each module for exactly the same amount of time. A current limiting power supply would be used, but be sure that it is one which is stable in this application. (The BioRad model 200 power supply, for instance, was unstable when charging a Honda Civic Hybrid pack at 300mA until I added a drop resistor in series. It was designed for a purely resistive load and packs of serial NIMH batteries are not that.) Charge all of the modules to say 30%. Just enough to run diagnostics on the battery, and possibly to start the car. I don't recall what the ratings are for these cells so cannot tell you how many minutes that would be. If your power supply does not go to a high enough voltage to do the whole pack then clamp it around however many modules in sequence in the pack it can handle. In any case, for a short charge like that from fully depleted you don't need to worry about any cells hitting fully charged, at which point the current would have to be limited to ~300mA (a guess) so that the slower cells can catch up without damaging the fully charged cells. If some of the cells are already bad 2A may be too much for them, but in that case you need a new pack anyway.
     
    TPolo likes this.
  15. jdenenberg

    jdenenberg EE Professor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    3,462
    1,528
    1
    Location:
    Trumbull, CT
    Vehicle:
    2020 Prius
    Model:
    LE AWD-e
    I posted it on TPs page anyway (Nancy's page only had the 2006-2009 manual).

    JeffD
     
    SFO and JC91006 like this.
  16. Aegean

    Aegean Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2019
    255
    113
    0
    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    ----USA----
  17. TPolo

    TPolo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2021
    8
    0
    0
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
  18. TPolo

    TPolo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2021
    8
    0
    0
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Replied to your response! It's on the top of the thread
     
  19. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    4,229
    3,883
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    You would take off the HV battery cover to see if the modules have sequential serial numbers. You might consider reconditioning the battery by using a grid charger and discharger.

    Since the HV battery fan is nearby, check for build up, then clean if needed. With the rear plastic removed, you can also look for leaks.
    Be sure you buy a quality product : Hybrid battery diagnostic and repair tool for Toyota and Lexus

    Many like to use a mini-vci cable (or better) and techstream (dealer technician diagnostic software) installed on a windows device.
     
Loading...