Never too young for colon cancer.. Where I've been

Discussion in 'Fred's House of Pancakes' started by F8L, Apr 25, 2009.

  1. geeky teacher

    geeky teacher New Member

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    Best wishes F8L. It must be frustrating to wait for all the testing to be completed. Keep us posted. We're pulling for you.
     
  2. tochatihu

    tochatihu Senior Member

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    This is a long hill to climb but I have no doubt you'll make it to the top. Post again when you can!
     
  3. Neicy

    Neicy Member

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    Sending positive vibes your way. I think being young works to your advantage, since you are stronger than an older person would be. I have a family history of colo-rectal cancer and pre-cancerous polyps in both sides of my family. My Godmother had a golf ball sized tumor removed that had not spread, and no other treatment, and no recurrance for the rest of her life. I will be keeping you in my thoughts and prayers, and thanks for sharing. You have many friends here hoping for the best for you.
     
  4. PriuStorm

    PriuStorm Senior Member

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    Hey Neighbor... I have been missing your smiling face around here. :)
    I was your age when I was struck with long term illness (including kidney failure and dialysis), but use that to your advantage.... you're young, strong and have a good attitude, all work in your favor. Stay positive, I'll be thinking good thoughts your way.
     
  5. mrblaise

    mrblaise Go Lakers!!

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    Sending good thoughts your way. Stay positive .....
     
  6. patsparks

    patsparks An Aussie perspective

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    May as well have a laugh while we wait for the results of the future tests eh?
     
  7. bestmapman

    bestmapman 04, 07 ,08, 09, 10 and 16 Pri

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    Sorry to hear that. My prayers are with you.
     
  8. bevspark

    bevspark Toyota, Major Sponsors of The

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    F8L sending you many good wishes from Down Under.
     
  9. Dipena

    Dipena Senior Member

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    I believe that elevated eosinophils are a favorable prognosticator in colon cancer. So that is a positive.
     
  10. nascrlvr

    nascrlvr nascrlvr

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    F8L.......thank you for sharing what you are going through. That takes amazine courage. Know that I am praying for you, for the caregivers and your family through this. Come back often..........there is much support here. God bless you!!!
     
  11. RobH

    RobH Senior Member

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    Several recommendations for dealing with your cancer.

    The first is to get current on recent research on the effects of vitamin D3. Basically there would be up to 90% less cancer if everyone had a high vitamin D3 level. It obviously varies by the particular cancer, and I'm sure there is no agreement about the 90% number. But whatever the actual number is, it is a large proportion of the current incidence.

    Most of the current research is cancer incidence, but there is also encouraging data about cancer treatment. It is so safe and trivial cost to implement, I think it only prudent to maximize any affect that an adequate level could provide.

    While the current RDA is something like 400 IU per day, an effective dosage is at least 2000 IU, with credible evidence for 5000 to 10,000 IU being more appropriate.

    If you're willing to NOT take any supplemental calcium, then 50,000 IU per day is an even better dose. Several doctors (including my endocrinologist) maintain that there is no cause for concern about overdose for anything below a million units, and above that we just don't know. The reported problems are all related to taking supplemental calcium or vitamin D2. D3 is the stuff you should use.

    Blood tests are a mixed bag. LabCorp provides results that generally track the values reported in most research. Quest results tend to run high, resulting in a false sense of security. While a value of 90 ng/ml is a reasonable target for maximal effect, values in the hundreds are still quite safe. Note also that it is tissue level that determines effect, and blood is just a transport mechanism. So the blood level is an indirect test that may not represent tissue level, particularly when you have recently changed supplements or sun exposure. You can order your own blood spot test for D3 for about $50. Medicare recently cried foul at a $600 charge for a D3 test, so there may be (should be) a controversy about how much a test costs.

    The vitamin D council is a good source for references. I find them a bit conservative, but light-years beyond typical medical practice.

    The Canadian Cancer Society believes that the current medical research justifies recommending a daily supplement of 1000 IU of vitamin D. I wish the American Cancer Society paid as much attention to current medical research.


    The next comment is to check out "Ralph Moss Reports". Ralph Moss has spent most of his career tracking the effectiveness of cancer treatments. He offers a service of matching your medical diagnosis to the available treatments, and their track records.


    Cancer doctors have a reputation for being rather heavy handed in their recommendations. I've known a number of people who've fought cancer, and the survivors all got heavily involved in choosing their treatment. Just trusting such a doctor to act in your best interest is about like trusting a car salesman to put you in the right car. You may need their services, but make them prove it to your satisfaction. A Moss report can even up the knowledge gap between you and your doctor.

    Resist any urgency claims by the doctor. The cancer has been growing for 5-10 years, and a few weeks while you study your options isn't going to decrease the probability of successful treatment over the next 10 years. And a 10-year success is what you are working towards - there are all too many "successful" 5-year treatments that turn sour in year 6. I just attended a meeting today where one of the doctors reported that he had had cancer for the past 17 years (I think he said he was 76?). Yes, he has cancer, but he'll probably die of something else in another 20 years.

    Hang in there, good luck, and get involved in your treatment!
     
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  12. patsparks

    patsparks An Aussie perspective

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    I'm going to pick up some vitamin D3 tomorrow.
     
  13. efusco

    efusco Moderator Emeritus
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    I wouldn't get in a hurry:
    ACS :: Vitamin D
     
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  14. patsparks

    patsparks An Aussie perspective

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    Thanks Doc.
     
  15. Rae Vynn

    Rae Vynn Artist In Residence

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    Spend about 10 minutes out in the sun every day, without sunscreen, and your body will make all the vitamin D it needs, without risk of toxicity.

    I'd suggest wearing a hat, and letting the sun hit your arms, back, chest, legs, etc., while protecting your scalp from overexposure.
     
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  16. daniel

    daniel Cat Lovers Against the Bomb

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    Take a look at the link Evan posted. Not everybody is equally efficient at making vitamin D from sunlight.

    Still, I imagine Pat gets plenty of sun in his daily life.
     
  17. Rae Vynn

    Rae Vynn Artist In Residence

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    This is true. Vitamin D deficiency is actually worse amongst dark-skinned people, as it takes a bit more sun for them to synthesize vitamin D.
    Pat has coloring very similar to mine... so 10 minutes would be more than enough for him, I would wager! :p

    It is troubling that rickets is making a comeback... so many people have been terrified to have unfiltered sunlight hit them, or their children, that vitamin D deficiency has become rampant in some places.

    Information: Vitamin D myths, facts, and statistics
    Vitamin D deficiency linked to Health Concerns in Adolescents
     
  18. RobH

    RobH Senior Member

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    Well, I read the entire report. While the commentary about vitamin D generally dismisses it as useful for cancer, the examples demonstrate that it is useful. At least the ones where the subjects actually consumed the vitamin D...

    A few samples of items I have trouble with in that report:

    This qualifies as reportable research? It might have worked better if the women had actually taken the pills. But probably not since 400 IU isn't enough to show a cancer reduction.
    Sounds fairly positive to me. But don't anybody act on this until "further studies are done". Ever read a study that didn't need further study?
    Sounds fairly positive.
    Bingo! Vitamin D deficiency makes cancer worse. Correcting that deficiency seems to me like an obvious component of effective treatment.
    If you want to read more relevant studies on the effect of vitamin D, I'd recommend starting with Vitamin D Council | Understanding Vitamin D Cholecalciferol .

    None of the study results referenced in the ACS report conflicts with anything I said above. I said 2000 IU was a useful supplementation level, with 5000-10,000 IU probably better. 50,000 IU may be appropriate for cancer control. The ACS report says that 400 IU is useless, and that 2000 IU is marginally useful. Does anyone think that there a conflict between saying that 50,000 IU is useful, and saying that 400 IU is not?



    Rae: You should really get a blood test for your vitamin D3 level. I think you'll find that the available sun exposure in Washington State, particularly in winter, is simply inadequate to provide a healthy level of vitamin D. It may work in San Diego, but Seattle is another matter. I know you don't eat enough raw whale bones...
     
  19. RobH

    RobH Senior Member

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    Here's a link to a short video that mentions a 75% reduction in all cancers when 1100 IU of D3 is used over 4 years. Video
     
  20. dwdean

    dwdean Member

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    Best wishes F8L. I know this has got to be a challenge, just take everything one step at a time. We're pulling for you.
     
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