New Subaru Outback -- Winter tires?

Discussion in 'Fred's House of Pancakes' started by cyberpriusII, May 5, 2019.

  1. cyberpriusII

    cyberpriusII Prodigyplace says I'm Super Kris

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    New owner of a 2019 Outback. Went for a four-hour drive yesterday and am still a bit "sore." No, I did not drive....

    Anyway....been reading and considering, snow tires for the car. Local guy wants to put on Cooper True North studless. I am thinking Blizzaks WS80.

    Any ideas?

    Am I overthinking this totally. Oregon Coast Range. We do not get that much snow....little paranoid I guess.
     
    #1 cyberpriusII, May 5, 2019
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    my daughter spent last winter in her new impreza, 400 mile round trip weekends from boston to the catskills and back. she didn't have any trouble with the oems a/s tires, but drives conservatively.
     
  3. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    Speaking of daughters, lol: our daughter's got Nordman WR SUV tires on her Pilot. They've got the mountain/snowflake symbol, described as an "all-weather" tire, something you'd leave on year 'round, as opposed to doing snow tire swaps.

    I've driven it a few times and they're uneventful, which is good I think. They're actually a Nokian tire, their budget line of all-weather tires, if I'm not mistaken. A pricier alternative is the Nokian WRG3 SUV. Up here Kal Tire is the main (and maybe only?) source for Nokian, not sure regarding availability in the States.

    Tires | Car, Mini-Van, Cross-Over, Truck & SUV Tires
     
    #3 Mendel Leisk, May 6, 2019
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
  4. Skylis A

    Skylis A Senior Member

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  5. cyberpriusII

    cyberpriusII Prodigyplace says I'm Super Kris

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    Thanks for the tips! And, obviously, I have too much time on my hands, but that may be changing, I hope.

    Anyway, I was really interested in the "all-weather" option. The better ones look about as good as average winter tires (or better) which would be good enough for me.

    Then I realized that I would probably have to wait two years or so until the OEM tires are worn out -- and I don't want to just discard them (even though the web chat indicates the Bridgestone Duelers AS that come with the Outback are only so-so).

    So, back to thinking "real winter tires" on a separate set of wheels -- would be about $800 to $1,000 USD, depending where I buy (Discount Tire Direct is the cheapest I can find, TireRack is in the middle and a local tire store tops the list). That's without TPMS. Don't need the TPMS, but feel a bit stupid not having them installed, but I could find better uses for $200, also.
    Thanks again, all.
    kris
     
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  6. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Sand Pounder

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    The OEM all-seasons, especially ones fitted on SUV's, will be on their "best behaviour" for the first winter at least.

    OTOH, if you go for snows, check with dealerships, maybe they have some fall package offerings, compatible steel Subaru rims with snow tires.

    Our son got a Mazda CX5 last summer, and in fall local Mazda dealers were all offering such packages. Of course he didn't go for it, but I believe he will this coming fall; after his wife mentioned the Mazda steel rims didn't look half-bad.

    Interestingly, with Mazda TPMS sensors: 10 minutes of steady driving within some parameters, and the car will automatically detect and adjust to the new sensors. Maybe Subaru is similar?
     
    #6 Mendel Leisk, May 9, 2019
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  7. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    I'd still go with the Autosocks. You have one of the best AWD systems available on the Outback, and that is about as good with all seasons as FWD with snow tires.
    If two sets of socks are needed with the AWD, it will be less than half as much as a set of wheels and tires. Still have TPMS, and they lay flat in the cargo area.
     
  8. Salamander_King

    Salamander_King Senior Member

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    How big is your OEM wheel? I suggest Xice3 for Prius hands down, but I don't know if that is the best choice for AWD SUV or not. I think there is different Xice for SUV and Truck, but they are more expensive than the passenger car version. Yes, it can get very expensive to outfit big wheels with big tires. I recently purchased Pathfinder AWD SUV. It came with OEM 20 inch wheels. If I keep the OEM size, wheels and tires will cost at least $1500 without TPMS. Even if I go without separate rims and just buy tires, would be about $800 with the installation. Plus at the OEM size, there are very few winter tires to choose from. Tirerack list only two in that size. I could go with smaller rim and tire down to 17 inches which will bring the cost down some but still more than $1000 without TPMS. I am leaning toward saving money and keep the OEM tires for a couple of winters. I have done this many times with my passenger cars. With new tires while more than 6/32 inch of tread, I can manage winter driving without too much trouble. After OEM all season tires are down to 5/32 or below, I will change them with all-weather tires like Good Year ASSURANCE WEATHERREADY.
     
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