OEM hybrid battery vs newpriusbatteries?

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Technical Discussion' started by caliwaves, Jan 17, 2021.

  1. caliwaves

    caliwaves Junior Member

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    I'm close to Culver City Toyota which is offering the OEM hybrid battery for $1700 vs the $1600 at newpriusbatteries (@2k1Toaster). Given I have the benefit of local pickup, I'm curious what would be the advantages to using the latter? Its not something I need to do now, just want to be prepared for when that happens. Thank you.

    Edit:
    I have read past forum messages, and understand some owners do not live near a dealer offering OEM hybrid batteries at that price, making alternatives a better choice.
     
  2. Moving Right Along

    Moving Right Along Active Member

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    I believe the main advantage in going the aftermarket route in your situation is no core charge. So you could sell your existing battery modules if you wanted. Also, newer battery tech is typically better, and cylindrical cells are supposed to allow for greater airflow.
     
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  3. caliwaves

    caliwaves Junior Member

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    Thanks, I'm primarily interested in learning more about the technical advantages. Any chance you know what makes this newer battery tech better compared to OEM tried and tested? I do see from his website that it allows for better airflow. It'd be great to get feedback from members who have driven 0-25k, 25k-50k, >50k.
     
  4. 2k1Toaster

    2k1Toaster Brand New Prius Batteries

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    There is really no technical benefit. That's the whole point, the batteries are functionally equivalent.

    Many people find my pack easier to install, and we do have better airflow and report artificially higher temperatures (due to metal enclosure vs. plastic) which turns the fan on more and should also extend the battery life.

    If you can get an OEM pack for the same price, that works. Do keep in mind that we sell our packs for $1600 and there is no core. Meaning the actual price if you sell your old modules is between $1100 and $1350.
     
  5. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    One thing to consider is the future of the car as relates to warranty and repair and what you or future owner would have to deal with... An OEM battery pack that needs to be replaced before warranty expires (never heard of that for OEM replacement pack) could easily be done in any major city, but a New Prius Battery pack would require more challenging logistics. Of course odds of brand new going bad before expiration of warranty probably makes this concern moot.
     
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  6. Aegean

    Aegean Member

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    Truth is that after installation both batteries will be new and hopefully last another 15 years.

    The OEM battery is already assembled even-thought you still need to transfer some parts. The cylindrical cell modules need few extra steps to install them.

    The OEM purchase has a risk of not getting back your core deposit if core is not accepted as is.

    The OEM has proven its reliability for many years and hundreds thousand miles.

    The OEM is definitely more expensive considering that you return your core.

    It would be an apples to apples comparison if the cylindrical cell seller would offer a pre-assembled battery option while taking back the old battery core, keeping the good modules for resale and adjusting the price accordingly.
     
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  7. ozmatt

    ozmatt Active Member

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    symmetrical cells were a bit of a flop in the Hondas, going off their size I doubt they would hold anywhere near as much electrolyte .. personally i would stick with the prismatic but only time will tell i guess
     
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  8. kenoarto

    kenoarto Senior Member

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    Toyota 20 year proven record with a nationwide warranty vs. 2k1's tiny Colorado biz with only 3 year history.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
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  9. 2k1Toaster

    2k1Toaster Brand New Prius Batteries

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    The OEM pack and my pack have the same amount of DIY required. For Toyota you get the modules pre-installed and you have to move around all the electronics. In my pack you keep all the electronics where they are, and put in the modules. Of the people that have installed both, 100% have said installing my pack is easier and less work.

    And like you said, overall we are cheaper if you sell your old modules.

    I don't expect anyone to read through thousands of posts, but this is wrong.

    Hondas eat through modules, any modules, because the ECU trashes them on purpose. Toyota beat Honda in efficiency with the Prius over the Insight and Honda was caught surprised. So very late in the design cycle, they increased the depth of discharge. This worked on paper, they got their numbers up for the EPA. But it killed batteries very early. Our Civic hybrid needed 3 batteries under warranty. Al original. There are replacement batteries with cylindrical modules for Hondas and these are actually not a bad idea. Because the batteries are going to die in 3 years or so anyways, buying a battery that is only good for 3 years is fine.

    As for our batteries, ours are cylindrical but that is only the shape. We do actually put 6.5Ah per cell and they are just as good as the originals. That is the whole reason our batteries exist. If I could buy a YABO pack and do zero work and get the same result, I would have. My time is valuable.
     
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  10. ozmatt

    ozmatt Active Member

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    will be interesting to see what happens as time goes by, they may last longer guess we have to wait and see, i hope you are right! .. do the cylinder cells have vents
     
  11. 2k1Toaster

    2k1Toaster Brand New Prius Batteries

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    They do but not ever needed. Because they're metal cylinders they can take pressures way higher than plastic rectangles. If it gets to a danger point where it needs to vent, everyone inside the car is already long dead or the damage is done to a place where a vent wouldn't help.

    Prismatic cells are not good from a mechanical standpoint to withstand pressures.
     
  12. ozmatt

    ozmatt Active Member

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    Nice one, that's not quite correct though, they definitely need vents that's why they have them!

    good luck with it, im not enough of a risk taker to justify the risk at the current price point however i guess that will go down over time.

    i admire you're initiative

    cheers
     
  13. 2k1Toaster

    2k1Toaster Brand New Prius Batteries

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    Yes it is correct.

    The only time a vent is needed is when the internal pressures are higher than the casing can take. The internal pressure is mostly related to temperature. Volume doesn't change much, pressure changes a bit but again not much. It's temperature. And in normal temperature ranges, no venting. With excess temperatures that are harmful to the pack but possible in the Prius, still no venting most of the time with prismatic packs. No venting ever with my pack because I can hold the pressures MUCH higher than the plastic rectangle. It's just physics. By the time the vent in my cells open, the temperature needs to be so high, it's fatal. But they exist.
     
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  14. ozmatt

    ozmatt Active Member

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    lol no worries I will leave it at that! i still like my vents :)
     
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