Oil Consumption reduced 1-2 qt. every tank of gas to 1 qt/oil change

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by bernie3015, Mar 1, 2020.

  1. bernie3015

    bernie3015 Junior Member

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    I have a 2007 Prius with 272k miles on it. It had been burning significant amounts of oil for the last 72k. It was getting even worse and I always drove around with a quart of oil in the car and the car would go thought at least 1.5 quarts of oil with every tank of gas. I found a way to soak the piston rings without taking the engine apart. Now the engine is burning no more than 1 quart of oil every oil change. I stopped looking at the dip stick all the time. The picture below is from another 2007 Prius that only has 109k miles on it. I wanted to stop the problem before it started with this car. In the pictures you can see the cylinder wall and the top of the piston.
    [​IMG]

    For more information go to: Burning oil problems solved - how to clean piston rings (oil & compression)
     
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  2. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

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    Care to share you magic solvent brew with the rest of us? :whistle:
     
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  3. bernie3015

    bernie3015 Junior Member

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    It not the brew so much as the procedure. I spent a lot of time trying this on two different Prius and writing it up and taking pictures. If you want the full description of what I did just go to the link and buy something I will include a print out of the procedure.
     
  4. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

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    So after going to your link, it still doesn't say what solvent you used:whistle:.

    Mind sharing;).

    Proofreading can also be your friend(y).
     
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  5. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

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    Not that interested in the procedure, but would be interested in the brew or the solvent(s) used.
    Not that interested in the write up or pictures, unless you're posting them here to share with the rest of the community.
    Not that interested in buying something at this time, and didn't realize this thread was a sales advertisement.

    You may want to flag this thread and asked a mod to move it over to the appropriate section.
     
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  6. edthefox5

    edthefox5 Senior Member

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    What kind of oil do you use and whats the oci?
     
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  7. uart

    uart Senior Member

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    I'm thinking maybe the oil rendered from cans of Spam?

    Sorry Bernie, this does seem a lot like a testimonial based advert.
     
    #7 uart, Mar 1, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2020
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  8. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    Wait a sec...
     
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  9. dig4dirt

    dig4dirt MoonGlow

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    Still didnt update that old school webstore!
     
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  10. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

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    Probably in the same vein as proof reading;).
     
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  11. dig4dirt

    dig4dirt MoonGlow

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    Ohh darn, location hehe ftw
     
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  12. bernie3015

    bernie3015 Junior Member

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    I did not try lots of engine cleaners so I am not going to mention one here. I did use one and worked out how to use it but again that is procedure. So you now know that someone claims you do not have to live with engine oil burn and ruined catalytic converters and I even included pictures of the cylinders. Will I get any thanks from people on Prius chat. No. Will I post here again. Again no.
     
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  13. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    Bernie, I don't want to burst any bubbles, but you are far from the first person to post on the forum about cleaning/soaking pistons and cylinders to improve oil consumption problems.

    Now, you may be the only person that continually posts "info lures" here while including links trying to sell stuff.

    Most others post the info here directly, trying to help each other.....

    Take it however you want ....
     
  14. ydpplqbd

    ydpplqbd Member

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    Hey Bernie,

    You have asserted "but again that is procedure". I am setting forth my best guess at "Bernie's procedure" (Bernie, please let me know whether I got your procedure set forth properly):

    1. Remove all four ("4") spark plugs from your Gen2 1.5l engine;

    2. Insert 4oz of Marvel Mystery Oil (AKA "MMO") through each spark plug hole;

    3. Allow MMO to soak overnight (make sure nothing gets into spark plug holes - reinstall spark plugs loosely to prevent debris from entering cylinder);

    4. Next day, remove hand-tightened spark plugs, use suction pump (or vacuum pump) to remove any remaining MMO, reinstall spark plugs (use never seize on threads);

    5. Start engine (using foot on gas or maintenance mode);

    6. Create large vacuum leak (intent is to run engine as lean as possible which equates to as hot as possible) by removing large vacuum hose temporarily (if possible check AFR using OBD2 insert and Torque Pro or Dr. Prius);

    7. Run engine at approximately 2000 rpm for about 5 minutes (or until smoke from MMO clears) ; and

    8. When smoke clears, shut down motor and reconnect vacuum hose (which was temporarily removed). Also check motor oil for proper level after this procedure (in order to not contaminate "new oil", I would try to do this procedure right before an oil change).

    PS Bernie, let me know whether we can sell my best-guess of your procedure on your website (or perhaps offer as a freebie come-on to get people to purchase other items from you).

    PPS After doing all this cleaning, you may want to install an after-market oil catch-can between PCV valve and throttle plate. Thereby preventing the majority of spoils (namely, oil mist, unburnt fuel and condensation/water) from entering the combustion chamber (and ultimately the catalytic converter).
     
    #14 ydpplqbd, Mar 5, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2020
  15. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Senior Member

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    Maybe just a bit of shop rag instead of step #3?

    And this is a can of worms, but Toyota recommends 13 foot/pounds for the second gen spark plug install, and makes no mention of anti-seize. Applying anti-seize and using that torque value will be a big change. Denso too, recommends dry threads. FWIW, never-seize is even slipperier than anti-seize: my pocket reference lists a torque reduction of 0.45 for it.
     

    Attached Files:

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  16. ydpplqbd

    ydpplqbd Member

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    .
    I am just trying to prevent galvanic corrosion (IOW stainless steel and aluminum do not play well together but never-seize helps to prevent galvanic corrosion).

    See: Stainless Steel & Aluminum: Why You Shouldn't Use Them Together and Proper Precautions To Take If You Do | Albany County Fasteners

    Brief excerpt from above link:

    Why Can’t You Use Stainless Steel and Aluminum Together


    The combination of aluminum and stainless steel causes galvanic corrosion. In order to understand why you shouldn’t use stainless steel and aluminum together, we first need to understand how galvanic corrosion works. Galvanic corrosion is the transfer of electrons from one material (anode) to another (cathode). In addition to knowing what galvanic corrosion is, we also need to understand the technical terms that go along with it.
    Here are all of the technical terms we will be using during this post:
    Anode – material that is positively charged, electrons leave this material
    Cathode – material that is negatively charged, electrons enter this material
    Electrolyte – liquid that aids in the process of electron transfer
    Corrosion/corrode – Destroy or weaken metal gradually

    How It Works: Galvanic corrosion occurs when two materials (an anode and a cathode) come into contact with each other and an electrolyte. Electrolytes can be environmental factors such as humidity or rainwater. When these factors come into play, electron transfer will begin to occur. Depending on the level of resistance in an electrolyte, this transfer can happen much faster. This is why salt water, an electrolyte with a very low resistance, is a common factor when considering what product to use. Due to this, it is incredibly important to consider what material you are going to use in an environment. When working with a marine, salt water environment, you even need to consider the type of stainless steel you are using. There are multiple kinds of rust that can occur during the oxidization process. To find out more about them please read this blog post about Three types of rust that frequently occur.

    Our Example: For the rest of our post, instead of referring to anode and cathode, we will be using the example of aluminum (anode) and stainless steel (cathode). When aluminum and stainless steel are used in an assembly together, the electrons from the aluminum will begin to transfer into the stainless steel. This results in the aluminum weakening. This weakened aluminum causes it to deteriorate at a much faster rate [emphasis added]. This can lead to an extended life of the stainless steel. Note: Aluminum, if left on its own with the electrolyte, will still lose its electrons eventually, but having stainless steel present will significantly speed up this process.

    PS Picture below of spark plug removed with some of the aluminum from head attached. Pic was found online from a marine application (same principle).

    spark_plug_with aluminum attached.JPG
     
    #16 ydpplqbd, Mar 5, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2020
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