P0A80 triangle check engine error

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Main Forum' started by exmetrodriver, Jan 1, 2019.

  1. exmetrodriver

    exmetrodriver Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    124
    15
    0
    Location:
    Puget sound, Wa.
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    II
    So i had all the bad dash error lights turn on while driving home last night (triangle/check engine/ect.). I take it to a auto parts store on the way home and have them check what code(s) it's sending. The only one is P0A80 (replace hybrid battery). So I pull the hybrid battery and check each cell. And they all read 7.77 - 7.99 Volts. Could this still be a failed cell? Your thoughts please.
     
  2. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2016
    4,271
    4,612
    0
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    Touring
  3. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2016
    11,104
    15,196
    0
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    Vehicle:
    2019 Prius Prime
    Model:
    Prime Plus
    The code reported has many different possibilities ;).

    You’ll need a better code reader to determine what set the P0A80 code.

    Once you have the more specific code, post it here and we’ll do what we can(y).
     
    Skibob likes this.
  4. exmetrodriver

    exmetrodriver Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    124
    15
    0
    Location:
    Puget sound, Wa.
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    II
    I didn't know that the P0A80 code can be other issues. That's not good. So who would have a "better code reader" without going to the dealer?

    I read the link above. I checked the 12V battery and it tested 12.66 V. So not having a bad hybrid battery cell, is it safe to drive if I put the battery back in till I figure out the error code?
     
  5. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2016
    11,104
    15,196
    0
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    Vehicle:
    2019 Prius Prime
    Model:
    Prime Plus
    The P0A80 is the “parent code” and there will be more specific “child codes” present. These appear as snowflakes on Techstream and will be more specific in terms of what the problem can be.

    There are dozens of codes associated, so getting to someone with a better code reader is in your best interest.

    Could you drive the car: probably as you made it to the autozone and home.

    Would it be wise to drive the car in a state it is telling you it has a problem: no as you should determine what is the cause and address it.

    Good luck and keep us posted (y).
     
    Skibob and SFO like this.
  6. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    4,055
    3,827
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    Vehicle:
    2007 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
    Actually it offers a little bit of hope, as it could be something less expensive.
    You can try some other auto parts shop(s), they all have/use different readers even within the same 'chain'. If you have a laptop/computer, you can pick up a mini-vci cable with a copy of techstream for about $20 online, which is basically what the dealers use.

    How many miles do you have on this vehicle?

    Here is the workup for PA080 :

    https://share.qclt.com/%E4%B8%B0%E7%94%B0%E6%99%AE%E7%91%9E%E6%96%AF%E5%8E%9F%E5%8E%82%E8%8B%B1%E6%96%87%E6%89%8B%E5%86%8Cpdf%E6%A0%BC%E5%BC%8F/repair%20manual/04pruisr/05/20zmw/cip0a80.pdf

    If the HV battery fan hasn't been cleaned recently/before you could clean it while everything is apart. Of course doing such most likely won't solve the problem, but is a good idea none the less. A dirty HV battery fan has been known to throw the same code on other generations and models. Also pay close attention to the HV fan connector and any corrosion, which appears to be common.

    Without letting the HV battery sit (days/weeks) you may not be able to assess which module is actually weak with a multi-meter, if you can wait days/week(s) the failing modules will be apparent with a displayed voltage 'sag'. If you can't be without the vehicle for any length of time, you can load test each module individually.

    Have you looked for any leakage on or under the battery assembly, or corrosion in or around the harness and connectors already?
     
    Raytheeagle likes this.
  7. Skibob

    Skibob Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2018
    2,902
    1,477
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    Vehicle:
    2006 Prius
    Model:
    N/A
  8. exmetrodriver

    exmetrodriver Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    124
    15
    0
    Location:
    Puget sound, Wa.
    Vehicle:
    2005 Prius
    Model:
    II
    I have about 189,000 miles on it. I replaced a HV cell back in 9/2017 and it got me about 18,000 miles. I cleaned out the fan this week, but I will check the connection tonight. I didn't see any leaking or corrosion on the battery. I guess I'm going to put the battery back in tonight so I can get more info from the code it's throwing.
     
Loading...