Rebuilt HV battery issues, please send help.

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Main Forum' started by Corban, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Corban

    Corban New Member

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    Hello all!

    First of all let me say thank you to the forum users, y’alls information has helped me a great deal! I’ve been doing my research however and have yet to find an actual solution to my issue. Now on to the problem.

    I’ve recently rebuilt my Prius HV battery, now these codes are showing up:

    C0200
    C1241
    C1242
    C1259
    C1310 (1. Active Booster Solenoid 2. HV System Malfunction)

    I took the HV battery back apart and checked all the connections and made sure each of the nuts was secure. I’ve also disconnected the 12v battery many times to reset the codes, usually they come on within the first 50ft of driving the car. The 12v reads about 12v in ACC and 14.5v I’m ready. After unplugging the 12v the HV battery will show about 5 blue bars but quickly goes down to 2 purple bars and then the dash lights up and the CEL (and red triangle, and (!) lights as well) are thrown and the hybrid fan kicks on loud full time. I’m a dad with 3 little kids so I don’t want to (or have the money to) go buying each part until it’s fixed. I’ll replace the 12v if I have to but it’s holding its charge so even though it seems a bit low I can’t imagine it’s needed yet.

    Any advice is appreciated!
    Thanks,
    Corban
     
  2. Raytheeagle

    Raytheeagle Senior Member

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    Welcome to Prius Chat (y).

    Some questions:
    • How many miles on your Prius?
    • Are you charging and balancing when you rebuilt your pack?
    • What code reader are you using?
    • How long have you owned the Prius?
    Good luck and keep us posted (y).
     
    #2 Raytheeagle, Sep 8, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2018
  3. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    So, the car is able to go "ready" and will drive under battery power for about 50 feet before it codes out?

    What are you using to read codes? There should be an HV Battery code in there somewhere
     
  4. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    If you have a multi-tester, test wires and the light bulb from one the headlights, this will help you identify the bad module: Prolong® Battery Module Load Tester User Guide – Hybrid Automotive

    Also reconditioning the remaining modules is fairly essential... You can do that with a bunch of RC / Drone type Nimh smart charger. Read more on the website above and once you're ready to do more work on it I can help you with more details.
     
  5. Corban

    Corban New Member

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    In answer to your questions.

    1. 177,863 miles
    2. I wasn’t able to find any good diy on balancing the battery after rebuild so I tried what a friend who rebuilt his suggested, to force charge it each day for 3 days (without doing any other driving) so it shouldn’t be sitting on residual charge but I don’t know that for sure.
    3. It’s an Innova 3100 which reads ABS (the abs menu is where I found the codes)
    4. I’ve owned the Prius for about 1.5 years now, or about 25,000 miles.

    Thanks!
     
  6. Corban

    Corban New Member

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    That’s correct, it will still drive even after the codes are thrown, but the hybrid fan runs really loudly and I’m scared it’ll overheat the HV battery. I’m using an Innova 3100 to read the codes. Before I worked on it the Prius was throwing a PA080 code. That no longer appears just the other codes I listed.

    Thanks!
     
  7. Corban

    Corban New Member

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    So you think I still have a bad module in there somewhere? I’ve not load tested each module but when I installed them about a week ago I did take just a basic reading of each cell, they were reading at a similar voltage to each other (well within the .3 variance) and today when I took the battery back apart to check connections I went ahead and removed one of the orange rails and tested them with the volt meter and they're all reading at about 8.05v (they were all sitting around 7.6 when I installed them, but I’m assuming the force charging brought them up to 8.05)

    Thanks!
     
  8. Corban

    Corban New Member

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    I guess I should also mention it’s a 2007 Base model Prius. No issues before this, regular maintenance (brakes, oil, tires) all done when needed.
     
  9. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Yep, I went thru exact same thing first time... All the voltages looked great, cleaned up huge amounts of corrosion, put it back in, put car back together and a few blocks down the road all the lights came on again. That's because all the batteries are wired up in series rather than parallel and once you get huge amps running through the system (120amp fuse is on an HV pack) the bad cell within the module screws it all up... Sometimes it's not the amperage, but just the resistance, which after a longer drive heats everything up, which makes the weakest cells weaker real fast.

    On the bright side, it only takes an hour to do a two minute load test/discharge on each module and thanks to your forced charging before you pulled i tout you should be ok with state of charge when you put it back in... Also sometimes after rebuilding a pack, it'll be fine on short trips or longer ones in cool weather, but soon as you're on the highway for an hour and things heat up...

    Currently have this concern with one of my friend's Prius I've been working on and I know there's a bad module in their somewhere and I still have more to learn about finding the bad one before it's really bad. In the meantime, my friend is happy her car is mostly fixed, just not yet warning light free on longer freeway drives. In time the module will be easier to identify...

    In the meantime, I keep pondering all the data I got from: 1) load testing, 2) from three rounds of increasingly deeper and deeper discharge and recharge (aka: battery conditioning/restoring capacity/lowering resistance) and, 3) Hybrid Assistant App via Hybrid Reporter app via OB2 Bluetooth device (learn more here: Hybrid battery diagnostic and repair tool for Toyota and Lexus ) I've a fairly good sense of which modules are suspect, but not to the point I want to start wasting my friends money replacing more modules yet.

    Similarly, you bad module will be more obvious as time goes by... Hybrid Assistant app allows you turn battery pack cooling fan speed up to full blast, so at least if you get warning lights, you can try to get home before things get too hot and ECU blocks use of Battery pack and then you're pretty much stuck till it cools down again. To me this is a worthwhile hassle to save money... To others on here they think it's silly and a waste of time. But compared to the cost of a new or rebuilt pack...
     
  10. Corban

    Corban New Member

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    Ok good to know. I’ll take the pack back out of the car and load test the cells. It won’t be too hard to get to since I haven’t put the back of the car back together while I’ve been testing it. Do you happen to have any good links or info on how to clean the corrosion? I have a bit, not too bad I think but still I should clean it up while it’s apart, last time I just used a bit of a wire brush on the worst parts.

    Also do you know of any good DIY options for reconditioning the pack? I’d rather not buy the $500 reconditioner. I have a 8a trickle charger but I haven’t tried anything like that since I was worried that might harm the HV battery.
     
  11. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Yea... You need to use a smart charger calibrated to the nature of NiMH Battery module... A mechanic friend of mine loaned me a couple of SKYRC IMAX B6AC V2 chargers, which can charge all different types of battery chemistry. Hobbyists who fly drones and RC planes and cars use them and they sell for about $40 each on Ebay. Be careful to not buy knock-offs with different looking graphics on the front.

    In gratitude for my friend loaning me his 2 chargers I bought a couple more, so now we have four of them, which speeds the process up big time. I also found a deal for (8) 12v 50w bulbs for $15 and some three way switches on ebay which I'm designing into a discharge and recharge rack that sits on top of the battery pack so there's no hassle with moving wires/alligator clips around and it speeds up the process.

    I've got a digital kitchen timer too and and those free multi-tester you can get via coupons at Harbor Freight for each module as well... When you flip the switch up and hit the timer a module discharges at 100w / 2 bulbs... As the voltage gets really low and discharge speeds up you hit the switch down and then it discharges with just one bulb at 50w.

    Perhaps you can find some others in your part of the country who need Prius battery pack reconditioning to help offset some of the costs? Or if you buy a wire harness / fan control for $150 from Eric Becky on here is in Wisconsin and will mail/rent you a Prolong Charger if you mail him a check/deposit.
     
  12. Corban

    Corban New Member

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    Ok tonight I load tested the cells, the result so were all extremely close. Each cell lost somewhere from .14v to .19v over the course of 2 minutes. So I’m thinking maybe the cells are good? I looked closer at the wiring harness and there may be more corrosion than I originally thought. I guess it’s possible the corrosion is interrupting the charging and causing the codes? I’m not sure what else would cause the codes.
     
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  13. PriusCamper

    PriusCamper Senior Member

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    Those are great numbers! Most of what I've worked on is in the range of .2 and sometimes as high as .3 so that's good news... Tomorrow I'll re-read the thread and see if I can offer more insight. Hopefully others will do the same. Next step is getting more data doing charge and discharge/reconditioning to extend the life of the pack. Once you're sure it's not corrosion, we'll have to go beyond the battery pack...
     
  14. Beary

    Beary New Member

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    Hi Corban, I hope you already fixed the HEV battery issue.
     
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