Replace Rear Caliper without Trouble Code

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by Siward, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. Siward

    Siward Member

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    Hi PriusChat,

    I am thinking of replacing my rear left caliper myself. The hard parts would be removing the parking brake cable and transferring the brake fluid hose quickly with minimal fluid loss. I have two copper washers, but I will try reusing the OEM one.

    What I am worried about is getting trouble codes with the Prius. Is there any precautions I can take? I will be sure to disconnect the negative battery terminal before starting this job. I don't have techstream. I have replaced pads/rotors before, but never had to do the caliper.

    I will get my mechanic to do this if it is too difficult. There are videos online that help show the parking cable removal. You need a 14mm box wrench to release the one-way clips.
     
    #1 Siward, Sep 12, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
  2. Siward

    Siward Member

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    As a side note, my OEM caliper is actually fine. I actually only wanted to replace my caliper mounting bracket. The upper part of the bracket seems to have worn down and doesn't hold the brake hardware properly anymore. The pad isn't seated properly, so outer pad isn't moving.

    The problem is price:
    Toyota OEM caliper mount bracket from dealer: $188+tax with one week to order from warehouse
    Toyota OEM caliper (whole assembly) from dealer: $260+tax with one week order from warehouse
    Raybestos Elemental3 aftermarket (non-remanufactured) caliper + bracket + hardware: $135+ 20 shipping (I bought other parts to offset shipping).

    I am not sure if the aftermarket caliper mounting bracket can be used together with the OEM caliper, but I guess I can try.

    The Raybestos caliper piston face looks like a 4-leaf clover and is more flat then the Toyota X propeller piston face that is prone is misalignment. Both calipers pistons can be pushed back in with a Isle cube. Maybe I will post a picture later.
     
    #2 Siward, Sep 12, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
  3. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    I haven't replace the calipers on a Prius, but it's no harder than any other car.
    Disconnecting the 12v battery is good. You are going to lose fluid, so just loosen the hose
    before removing the caliper. Then it will be easy and fast to do and won't loose much fluid.
    It would be a good time to flush the system with new clean fluid.
    You could check junk yards for the parts. I'm certain someone has the parts.
    If the caliper itself is okay, just the bracket, you may have to buy the whole assembly, and only
    replace the bracket. Then you wouldn't have to open the system.
     
  4. Siward

    Siward Member

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    I plan to disconnect the 12V battery. I will swap the fluid hose as fast as I can. When done, I will open the bleeder screw and get someone to pump the brakes while the car still isn't powered. Once fluid comes out of the bleeder close it then pump brakes again then put everything back together and reconnect the 12V. I will then turn on the car and pray for no error codes.

    I am posting to see if anyone has done this before, so that I won't get any trouble codes. It is risky being a DIYer.

    I bought a Raybestos FRC12542N. Maybe the caliper bracket will fit with the OEM caliper.
    Catalog

    There are no scrap Priuses in the junk yard. One 2010 Prius did show up 6 months ago, but quickly got sold. A junk yard caliper should be very rusted up.

    The dealership caliper bracket is seriously overpriced. I can probably buy an aftermarket and get installed and still come out ahead.
     
    #4 Siward, Sep 12, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
  5. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    If you search the INTERNET, for junk yards, you can find them.
    I purchased an EGR Cooler for $50 from a junkyard in another state.
    It's your money. :)
    I don't think pumping the pedal will work for the rear brakes, they are electric.
     
  6. Siward

    Siward Member

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    Maybe more junk yards in the US. I live in the biggest city in Canada. The closest junk yard with stock is 300km. Not worth the gas. All searches on ebay come up with shipments from the US.
     
  7. Rebound

    Rebound Senior Member

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    No, they are definitely hydraulic.

    You don’t understand the electric brake booster. In most cars, power braking is supplied from engine vacuum. But the Prius engine can shut off at any time, so they use an electric pump instead of a vacuum pump.
     
  8. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Titanic Social Director

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    Watch @NutzAboutBolts video on changing the brake fluid (without Techstream) on 3rd gen, it's linked in thread pinned at top of 3rd gen Maintenance forum. Play it safe and put the car in "invalid" mode for the duration of the time the brakes are open, and/or you're doing subsequent bleeding.

    The car should be "On", not Ready (two pushes of Start Button without foot on brake), then do the chicken dance as described, and watch for confirmation on the dash when done, that you're in "Invalid" mode.

    There are several ways you can be bumped out of invalid mode, which you want to avoid. @NutzAboutBolts lists them, and they're also mentioned in the attachement. One sneaky one is if a wheel turns, so be careful.
     
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  9. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    So, if I pump the pedal, the fluid will be forced out if the bleeder is open for the REAR brakes
    as it is for the front?
    Then there would be no reason to do them any different than non hybrid cars?
    To a complete fluid flush/change, you'd have to use techstream, or something similar, so it would
    activate the ABS valves to flush the fluid out of that, thing, I can't seem, to, remember, what it's called!!!!(n)(n)(n)(n)

     
  10. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Titanic Social Director

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    There is a very noticeable difference, bleeding the fronts vs rears:

    Fronts, with an assistant pushing the brake pedal, you've got to quickly open/close the bleeder, because the brake pedal will sink to the floor very quickly. They're basically traditional.

    Rears, the assistant can push the brake pedal continously, it doesn't drop, and you can hold the bleeder open as long as you want. Well within reason, you don't want to run the reservoir dry. All the while you can hear a little pump whirring.

    Again, watch @NutzAboutBolts video on this. The only comments I would make on the video:

    1. The Repair manual says to bleed in sequence front/right, front/left, rear/left and rear/right. This is a bit at odds with the video, though not sure how much it matters.

    2. In the video they use mechanical suction when bleeding, and also to get fluid out of the reservoir at the outset. I just used a syringe to baste out fluid from the reservoir, and a simple tube with bleed bolt coupler (no suction) and it worked fine.

    The video is really good, shows things that are glossed over in the Repair Manual:

    1. During the chicken dance, you need to depress the brake to get from Park to Neutral.

    2. You really need to open/shut the bleed bolt fast, when doing the front brakes. They use split screen to show how fast the brake pedal drops: you really don't want to leave it open more than a split-second.

    I used to two pints of Toyota DOT3 fluid (bottles up here say 473 cc :rolleyes:), and seemed to work out about right. I aimed to end up with the level the same as when I started, and with an ounce or two in reserve, just in case I wanted to fine-tune after a few days.
     
    #10 Mendel Leisk, Sep 13, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
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  11. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    You bleed the FURTHEST brake first. It takes the longest and uses the most fluid.
    The left rear would be quicker because not as much fluid. Same with rf and then lf.

    I did watch his video. He said it was electric. And I believe he also said they don't bleed the SAME
    as the fronts. You don't need the engine on to bleed the fronts.
    Front his video, I gathered you could NOT just pump the brake pedal for the rear, like the front.
    That is the info I received and also from other videos.

    I use a clear hose with a check valve to bleed mine, into a clear bottle so I can see the color change.
    The bottle is higher than the caliper, to keep any air bubbles from seeping back into the caliper, from gravity.

    I've done hundreds of brake fluid flushes on many many different brands and models of cars and never had a problem.
    If I don't have to run the car, I will just bleed the rear as usual. However, if when pressing the brake pedal, the electric
    motor kicks in to propel the fluid, even when the car is off, then I won't have to do it differently, except to press and hold
    the pedal(brake) for a few seconds, then release, and continue until the color of the fluid is clear/new.
     
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  12. The Critic

    The Critic Resident Critic

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    When you follow the guided function in Techstream or Autel, it does have you bleed the LR first.

    I always connect a maintainer to the 12V battery to prevent the battery from running low during the process. It is also important to not let the pump run for too long at a time; I believe 15 seconds (don't quote me on this) was the time limit.
     
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  13. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Titanic Social Director

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    Well Toyota says different, if you look at the attachment. FWIW, @NutzAboutBolts started with the rears, maybe doesn't matter.

    It's a tricky distinction, but "invalid" mode is with the car "On", not "Ready". The engine won't run, but all the dash lights are on, cabin fan will run (if it's on) and so forth. Toyota recommends to have the car in invalid mode, if you're bleeding brakes without Techstream.

    I don't think the pump will run continuously for the rear brakes, if you depress the brake pedal, when the car's off. Again, the Toyota drill is to have the car "On", and in Invalid Mode.
     
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  14. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    In actuality, I don't think it really matters which one to bleed first.
    I usually do the thing that will take the longest first, so I have less to do when I get tired or
    it's toward the end of the day! :)
    I'm going to try to get around to changing the rear pads this week. The only have 180,000 miles on then,
    and just under 1/2 the life. But I figured if I did replace them, I wouldn't have to do them ever again!
    And then flush the fluid while the wheels are off, making it easier. The front can be turned.
     
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  15. ASRDogman

    ASRDogman Senior Member

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    Should I decide to use techstream, I'll do it the way the programs says. It's their car, software, they SHOULD know
    the way they want it done, for whatever reason.
    When "I" say, the car "off", I mean, the car is OFF. No invalid or acc or anything else.
    Just "O F F" :)
     
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