Screw in the tire

Discussion in 'Prime Main Forum (2017-Current)' started by Gokhan, Jan 22, 2020.

  1. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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    Plug repair is a much simpler reaction than full replacement. And of course, verboten. :rolleyes:

    Just my hunch, but I do think significantly higher tire pressures are tougher on wheel bearings, suspension components. I'm not out to convince anyone, just keep my pressures close to recommended, a pound or two over at most.
     
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  2. Gokhan

    Gokhan Active Member

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    Toyo has a good technical bulletin on the tire inflation pressure vs. load capacity for ISO-metric, P-metric, LT-metric, and flotation types, explaining how to change the pressure when you change the tire type and size. See the PDF document.

    https://www.toyotires.com/tires-101/tire-load-and-inflation-tables

    Replacing all four ISO-metric tires (no P in the label) with four P-metric tires is usually not allowed. Why? Looking at the tables and charts, P-metric tires saturate their load capacity at 35 psi and the nonreinforced ISO-metric tires (maximum pressure 44 psi) saturate at 36 psi. Since ISO-metric tires have a greater load capacity, you will have reduced the load capacity of the car, as the recommended pressure is 36 psi, where the load capacity is already at maximum; therefore, you can't make up by increasing the pressure.

    This also shows that increasing the pressure beyond 36 psi in a nonreinforced tire has no safety benefit even if you're loaded with passengers and cargo.

    I'll probably adjust the pressures to 36 + 2 / 35 + 2 psi, the extra 2 psi to compensate for normal pressure loss over time. Since they lose about 1 psi in a month, after four months, it would be 36 - 2 / 35 - 2 psi, when I can add air again.
     
  3. jerrymildred

    jerrymildred Senior Member

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    I'm getting old. Everything reminds me of a story.

    Many years ago, as a mechanic in a beverage can factory, I went to the store room to get a new punch for one of my presses. The clerk gave me the wrong piece, but it was almost the same as what I wanted. I didn't check it and it just happened that that particular wrong piece fit perfectly into the wrong place. I started up the press and the shattered carbide wiped out about $40,000 worth of tooling and it took me the rest of the day to get it put back together and everything back in spec. Yup, taking a second to verify a part might seem like a waste of time, but in the long run it's worth it.
     
    #43 jerrymildred, Jan 25, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2020
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  4. sam spade 2

    sam spade 2 Senior Member

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    We should meet for lunch someday.
    The stories probably would last until supper time. :ROFLMAO:

    You can't trust anybody anymore.
    I had a tire on my C develop a "balloon" on the sidewall a couple of years back.
    Found a tire store with the right one in stock.
    They replaced it.
    BUT......upon inspection before driving off, the one with the pooch in the sidewall still was on the car.
    :mad:
     
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  5. Gokhan

    Gokhan Active Member

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    Update:

    I think my Prius Prime handles and rides better with the tire pressures set at the Toyota-recommended values instead of 44/43 psi. I will now keep them at the Toyota-recommended values. 0 - 1 mpg gain out of 60+ mpg in fuel economy is not worth having worse handling and ride and possibly reduced tire life.
     
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