Tesla Wall Charger (NEMA 14-50) for Prius Plug-In

Discussion in 'Tesla' started by Wolverine68, Jun 24, 2015.

  1. Wolverine68

    Wolverine68 Junior Member

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    I plan to install a Tesla Wall Charger (NEMA 14-50) for the Model S, can I use the Tesla wall charger for the Prius Plug-in as well.

    Will this damage the Prius because it is at 50amps?

    From the Toyota website, they offer a Leviton Level 2 charger (240V, 16A).

    I am not an electrical expert but I am wondering if using 50A vs 16A will cause damage.

    Thanks for any feedback on this!
     
  2. fotomoto

    fotomoto Senior Member

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    The actual charger is in the car and limits charging to 16amps. The EVSE is simply a glorified (and expensive) extension cord that safely connects the car to the source. My Energi is also limited to 16amps but I hook it up to a 20amp clipper creek charger every day. Most public charging is 30+amps but the PIP is safe to charge with those too.
     
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  3. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    I think not, and not because a higher rated amperage plug could hurt the Prius.
    Tesla has their own standard for plugs. So their wall charger won't plug into a Prius PHV, or any other plug in for that matter.
    They have an adapter to use the J1772 plugs of other EVSE units, and I believe the car comes with one to let you use public chargers.
    The Tesla could use that Levitron EVSE, but if 16 amps is its max, it will take longer to charge the S.

    If the goal is to have just one charger for both cars, or mostly charge the PPI from a standard outlet and occasionally use the other, get a J1772 EVSE with a higher amperage rating. A 40 amp one (I think 50 amp refers to the what the circuit is rated). It will charge the Tesla at a faster rate, and the PPI will only draw what it needs when plugged in.
     
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  4. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    if it comes with a j1772 adapter, it should work with the pip, or is it the other way around?
     
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  5. drmanny3

    drmanny3 Member

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    EV (Electric Vehicle) Charging Products
    , www.emotorwerks.com These are both good sites to visit. I have a Rav4EV that has a 10 kw charger on board. It can take a 40 amp charge. Tony at Quickcharge procured some Tesla portable 50 amp chargers and then converted them to accept a J1772 connector. They cannot go back to the Tesla hookup without taking them apart. It allows me to charge my Rav4EV in a variety of situations. The Tesla unit comes with a number of plugs that automatically adjust for the voltage. Kind of cool. I eventually purchased a Leviton 40 amp charger that I installed in the garage. I also have a Kia Soul EV that has a 6.6 kw charger on board. I use the Tesla unit to charge it. I have two 50 amp circuits that I added to our panel. So I can charge both at the same time. The Tesla depending on what model you have can accept much more juice. Unless you just want to top off I would consider a bigger unit. The connections are different so a J1772 will not fit the Tesla nor will the Tesla fit the Prius. The Prius has such a small battery that I doubt it would take very long to charge at even a low amperage. You can acquire a 12 or 16 amp 240 volt charger rather inexpensively. There is a guy in the Bay area who modifies the stock 110 volt units so that they will work at 240 volts. It costs about $200. I did this for my 2011 Leaf that had a 3.3 kw charger on board. I could charge it within about 3 1/2 hours at 16 amps. Lots of options. I would personally setup two circuits to give your self the most options.
    Manny
     
  6. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    Other way. This is the Tesla plug.
    [​IMG]

    The adapter fits onto the standard J1772 plug to match that,
     
  7. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    gotcha, thanks. i had a feeling i was confused.:)
     
  8. hill

    hill High Fiber Member

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    The Tesla EVSE actually WILL work on j1772 cars ... only in stead of using their adapter, it's easiest (relative term) to cut the Tesla head off and install the j1772 head - as several folk have already done ... like this one;

    [​IMG]

    There are VERY few plugins that can receive its full 10kW's from a portable ... but the Tesla EVSE is one of the only manufacturers that provide the capability to deliver that level of power. Of course you have to have a 50 amp breaker, if your ride can take that level of power. For the Prius? Not so much. RAV4-EV? Yes, it'll take 10kW's. That's what most of these conversions are for. Once it proved to work on the RAV4-EV - IIRC, there were additional mods done to its pilot code, to allow for other plugins. Of course - if you're going to use your ~ $800 Tesla EVSE on a Tesla AND another plugin ... best to get a 2nd portable EVSE.
    ;)

    Tony - the 1st to mod the Tesla cable (once modified he's dubbed it the, "Jesla") has a thread on the mod here;
    Tesla Model S UMC cut open and modified to J1772

    He's even got a bulk rate purchase plan, for those that want major overkill for their portable EVSE, and makes 'em up in lots;

    [​IMG]

    :eek:
    .
     
    #8 hill, Jun 25, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2015
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  9. Trollbait

    Trollbait It's a D&D thing

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    But would you cut the head off the cable of your Tesla wall charger so you could use it to charge other plug ins, and use the Tesla J1772 adpter to charge your Tesla from it?:)
     
  10. mmmodem

    mmmodem Taste Tester

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    If I ever add a Tesla to my PiP in the garage, I would do one of two things:

    1. Install a standard J1772 EVSE wall charger. This will work with any EV and all Tesla's come with the J1772 adapter. This is probably the cleanest solution. Cost would be $1000 - $2000 depending on installation and EVSE unit. I keep the mobile connector with each car in the trunk.

    2. A cheaper alternative is to have an electrician wire a 240 volt NEMA 14-50 outlet in the garage or share with the clothes dryer unit. Again, all Tesla's come with this adapter. I can then have the Prius EVSE modified to work with a NEMA 14-50 at 240V. This is much less expensive than purchasing a new wall charger as number 1 above. This is also more portable as I take all my equipment with me should I ever move. Cost would be well under $1000 or free if you already have a dryer unit in the garage you can unplug to charge with.

    I would not install a Tesla Wall Charger unit as it is proprietary only to Tesla.
     
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