This Doesn't Seem Right: Replace Wheel Bearing?

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by Captain Caseous, Oct 12, 2021.

  1. Captain Caseous

    Captain Caseous Junior Member

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    Hello, Everyone. Like others, my Gen 3, 2012 Prius IV with 110,000 miles showed the ABS, Brake & Traction indicator lights. Went to an auto parts store and their code reader said it was a rear speed sensor. Took it in and was told it was both rear speed sensors and that the only way to replace them was to totally replace both bearings for $1,550 (with labor). I couldn't wait for various reasons, but:

    A) were the speed sensors designed in such a way that, if they go, the entire bearing needs to be replaced?
    B) $1,500 seems crazy expensive for all of this. Was I ripped off?

    Thanks for any advice?

    CC
     
  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    idk about 1, but it is certainly worth getting a few quotes if you can
     
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  3. amarino

    amarino Member

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    Took it in where? The dealer? Post your receipt with part numbers, how much for each part, and labor?

    A) Yes according to the TIS (factory manual, see attached)
    • If the sensor rotor needs to be replaced, replace it together with the rear axle hub and bearing assembly.
    • The rear speed sensor is a component of the rear axle hub and bearing assembly. If the sensor malfunctions, replace the rear axle hub and bearing assembly.
    B) Checking just the part prices
    Each hub/bearing is ~$300:
    REAR AXLE SHAFT & HUB. 2012 Toyota Prius | Toyota

    I can't find the rear sensors but the fronts are ~$200 each:
    ABS & VSC. 2012 Toyota Prius | Toyota


    That would be at least $1000 in parts.
     
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  4. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    You don't pay extra for the sensors. When you buy the Toyota rear hubs, they have the sensors.

    The sensors are press-fit into the hubs. Toyota doesn't sell the sensors separately.

    You might be able to find some aftermarket brand that sells hubs and sensors a la carte.

    But if you remove the hub so you can take it to a press and change just the sensor, you will probably trash the bearings in the course of getting the hub out of the car (at least in a region that salts any roads).

    Then you need the hub anyway. Probably why Toyota doesn't sell the pieces separately.
     
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  5. rjparker

    rjparker Senior Member

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    I recently changed my two rear hubs. Bought Timkens which look identical down to the serial number. About $200 each which includes the non-replaceable speed sensors. My issue was a howling rear bearing. About an hour and half of work, primarily because one was rust welded and required a slide hammer, rented free at the local O'Reillys. Even if you pay a mechanic two hours you might be out $600. Half if you do just one. There are far less expensive hubs but most are likely to fail in a year. A 2012 Prius rear is Timken HA590373. I would verify.

    A comparison of my Prius v parts

    Toyota OEM vs Timken Rear Hub Bearings.jpg
     
    #5 rjparker, Oct 12, 2021
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2021
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  6. Captain Caseous

    Captain Caseous Junior Member

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    Thanks, everyone. Looks like it was how it was designed, though strange, and the numbers are in the ball park. Appreciate the commentary and examples.
     
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