UK Prius tyre life

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Main Forum' started by benway, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. benway

    benway New Member

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    Greetings

    Can some fellow UK Prius [2nd gen] owners please give me an idea of what kind of mileage you are getting out of your front tyres please [and what brand tyres your Prius came with]?

    Thanks very much!
     
  2. not1ie

    not1ie New Member

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    My car is Irish but apart form certain badges and it reads KMH instead of MPH should be identical.

    The car came with Bridgestone Touranza. I got 55,000km/34,000miles.

    I then changed to Kumho tyres which I am going to soon change but only got 40,000km/25,000miles, there is no more than a couple of thousand miles left on them. So I expect them to be changed at about 27/28,000miles when they reach about 1.8mm

    Did you rotate (roll back) the tyres from front to back at service intervals?
    If you do that then you will have a more even wear around the car and won't be left with bald front tyres when you have good thread on the rear, not good for handling or safety either
     
  3. ETP

    ETP 2021 Prime(Limit),Highlander HYB Plat,B52-D,G,F,H

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    Phoenician Tyre was queen of the seas, an island city of unprecedented splendor.
    She grew wealthy from her far-reaching colonies and her industries of purple-dyed textiles. But she also attracted the attention of jealous conquerors among them the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar and Alexander the Great.

    Five Millennia of History
    Founded at the start of the third millennium B.C., Tyre originally consisted of a mainland settlement and a modest island city that lay a short distance off shore. But it was not until the first millennium B.C. that the city experienced its golden age.
    In the 10th century B.C. Hiram, King of Tyre, joined two islets by landfill. Later he extended the city

    [​IMG]further by reclaiming a considerable area from the sea. Phoenician expansion began about 815 B.C. when traders from Tyre founded Carthage in North Africa. Eventually its colonies spread around the Mediterranean and Atlantic, bringing to the city a flourishing maritime trade. But prosperity and power make their own enemies. Early in the sixth century B.C. Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, laid siege to the walled city for thirteen years. Tyre stood firm, but it was probable that at this time the residents of the mainland city abandoned it for the safety of the island.
     
  4. GrumpyCabbie

    GrumpyCabbie Senior Member

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    Tire, Turkey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    What does this prove?

    You spell the rubber rim of a wheel after a city in Turkey or a word for fatigue.

    That's two extra ways to confuse. :p

    We spell it after an ancient city; which is unlikely to be used in common language. Therefore, our way makes more sense! :rockon:
     
  5. danvee

    danvee Blizzard Brigadier

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    Those numbers seem a tad low to me.

    As I'm only familiar with roads here in the US (asphalt and concrete, mostly), is it possible that in the UK/Ireland the road materials are more abrasive? Or that tire compounds are formulated differently for different markets?

    Sorry, I don't mean to do a partial hijacking of the thread, but I've often wondered....
     
  6. uart

    uart Senior Member

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    So what mileage do you get from your tires Danvee?

    I usually get about 60000km out of a set of tires. That's about 35 to 40 kmiles.
     
  7. danvee

    danvee Blizzard Brigadier

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    In my experience with other FWD cars (can't judge my own Prius yet-<5K on it so far), and some associates' experiences with their Prii, 35-42K are commonly seen. This is with almost fanatical attention to rotation, alignment and tire pressure.
    All are reasonably small and lighter weight cars (<3200lbs)
    We're also pretty much across the board with brands, as well.
    Best wear seems to go to the Goodyear Assurance tires and poorest with Firestone Firehawks.
     
  8. GrumpyCabbie

    GrumpyCabbie Senior Member

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    I managed about 20k out of my front tyres. This is not bad for a taxi due to all the turning, roundabouts and pulling out of junctions quickly. I used to get about 16k out of my diesel Peugeot 406. Even at 20k there was a fair bit of tread left (about 3mm) but my tracking was out and it was starting to wear the inner edge quite badly.

    If you drive more A roads or motorways you should get many more miles out of the front tyres. What I would recommend is that you replace the tyres with Low Rolling Resistance ones as these really do help eek out more mpg's.
     
  9. not1ie

    not1ie New Member

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    Going back to the difference of Irish/GB roads to American roads and tyres.
    The US tyres in my experience tend to be a harder compound and so should last longer plus there is a lot of concrete roads in the States and would be lower grip than tarmac. Which again should give more miles.
    A tyre works in 2 ways, mechanical grip and chemical grip, most road tyres never get into the chemical grip phase for most of the time. When you use mechanical grip then you tend to loose more of the thread quicker as the tyre slides more over the surface.
    Also the US roads are straighter, less bends = less tyre wear.
    Pothole wise then both are getting worse by the year.
    I would expect a tyre in the US to last slightly longer, that has been my experience with tyres or tires anyway.
    Of course different brands and different models have different compounds and they may even use different compounds from east coast to the west coast for the same tyres based on the higher road temps in the west.
     
  10. GrumpyCabbie

    GrumpyCabbie Senior Member

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    And don't forget that the UK & Ireland are world renowned for wet weather :)

    You need a tyre that will grip well in the wet and I believe that results in a softer tyre compound which wears quicker.

    You can buy cheap tyres from China but I have found the compounds to be way too hard to be safe in the wet. In a previous car I remember locking up and sliding down a slight slope at a red light because the cheap and nasty tyres I had used were too hard.

    I'll never skimp on tyres again after that!
     
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