Virus & Home Alarm thought, question?

Discussion in 'Fred's House of Pancakes' started by Stevewoods, Nov 27, 2020.

  1. Stevewoods

    Stevewoods Senior Member

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    Wifey is living in a house in Oregon. I am still hanging on at our home in Washington. Sometime (probably February), I will let loose of the gate post and let myself be pulled down to Oregon and we will sell the Washington house.

    In the meantime, wifey is scared she will be raped, murdered, or at least be made fun of, if she does not have a home alarm system at the VERY SAFE neighborhood house in Oregon.

    So, today, the sale I was waiting for....Simplisafe's Black Friday 50 percent off sale. I bought an alarm system for the Oregon house. Probably overbought....but with all the glass break sensors, motion sensors, camera and the various other gee-gaws, ended up paying $230, which I thought was MORE than reasonable (whether we need them or not....).

    Anyway, did the order, and the next thing I know, in my gmail spam box are a couple of emails offering me home security systems for cheap.

    Should I be worried about some sort of spyware on my computer....or is this just something that happened because google tracks all and sells all.....or what?

    Seems strange to me. I run the Microsoft defender as my primary AV program and use Malwarebytes once a week (free edition).

    Oh, and for what it is worth, I only use FireFox as my web browser and I use it only in private mode.
     
    #1 Stevewoods, Nov 27, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2020
  2. Salamander_King

    Salamander_King Senior Member

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    Are any of the email you received from the company you purchased from? Or maybe from a company somehow associated with the online vendor?

    That being said, if you transacted your online purchase using Chrome and you received an order confirmation email in your Gmail inbox, chances are your interest in a home security system already know to the system. Can not rule out the spyware or other malware, but it is also possible that your email contact was somehow "sold" by the online vendor.
     
  3. fuzzy1

    fuzzy1 Senior Member

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    ... or by gmail's owner, Google / Alphabet itself.

    Isn't that the primary purpose of gmail, so that Google can mine the content of customers' email traffic for all the individual detail they can possibly monetize? In return, customers get "free" email service.

    That is, presuming your gmail address was used in any way for the purchase transaction / receipt / acknowledgement.
     
    #3 fuzzy1, Nov 27, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2020
  4. Salamander_King

    Salamander_King Senior Member

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    Gmail certainly reads and extracts the contents to be used for Google's own apps and ads, but I am not sure if they do actually solicit the email address to third parties. That being said, I would not be surprised if that's what they do. As the adage says, "If you are not paying for a product then you are the product."
     
  5. Stevewoods

    Stevewoods Senior Member

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    Gosh, if you let yourself think about some of this stuff, some of it is truly scary....

    First, let me say, the actual spam I received, while disturbing, makes me wonder how many layers something like this might go. Seriously, once you get past the "really" factor, getting the spam email is not all that HORRIBLE....but it makes me wonder, as mentioned....if this might bite deeper into the bowels of the computer....anyway....

    Of course, it all could be simple coincidence.

    And, I really do not believe the alarm company I purchased from had anything to do with this -- they just happened to be the innocent bystanders. The company is highly praised for their product/service on numerous professional review/news sites. If I have malware, it is not their fault. But, if it were malware, if this is the worst it does... meh.
     
  6. AzusaPrius

    AzusaPrius Active Member

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    Yup they love to know everything you do, maybe try protonmail it is very good.

    Posted via the PriusChat mobile app.
     
  7. fuzzy1

    fuzzy1 Senior Member

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    I was thinking of the model used in some other advertising, where the customer list is never handed over directly to the advertiser. Instead, the company with the list of customer leads (e.g. Google) sends out the advertising on behalf of the advertiser (e.g. the competing security companies) to people fitting the desired profile. The advertisers get the contact information only of the people who respond, generally directly to the advertiser. The advertiser never gets contact info for the people who don't respond.

    This is a way for the holder of the lead list to protect it as proprietary information, so that they can continue to sell the service repeatedly, collecting revenue from each mass mailing. If they turned over the customer email lists to the advertisers, those advertisers don't need to come back to buy more service, at least not on a frequent basis.
     
  8. kenmce

    kenmce High Voltage Member

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    But it's not.

    Google scans everything that goes through G-mail. That's not a bug, it's part of the deal. I don't know how they apply the data, but why would they not monetize it? If you want to test this, try sending some emails referring to something that you've never seen ads for. Try, oh, "Bidets" or "Affordable private airplane", or "Worlds best golf club" or "Real Emerald jewelry". Anything that can be sold and that you've never mentioned there before.

    If you have a friend who's on G-mail, and want to have some fun with them, send them an innocuous email that has a few lines at the bottom written in white text on a white background. A human won't see it but the computer will. See if you can get his computer to serve him ads for, oh wait, I can't mention that kind of thing here...
     
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