What Makes Hybrids Go?

Discussion in 'Other Cars' started by V8Cobrakid, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. V8Cobrakid

    V8Cobrakid Green Handyman

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    ~The Full Article~

    What Makes Hybrids Go?
    Learn about possible tax breaks, car pool lane access and fuel economy ratings by
    Brian Chee


    Introduction

    It used to be so easy. If you wanted a hybrid, you had a simple choice: the Honda Insight, the Honda Civic and the Toyota Prius. All shared the same benefits: low emissions, high fuel economy, and a somewhat compromised performance character. Still, if you wanted to make a statement, save some gas and do your part for the environment, it was really a matter of choosing one of three.

    My, how things have changed. Hybrids have become the darlings of the industry, thanks to rising fuel prices and our awakening realization that we’re running out of oil. As the prez says, we’ve got ourselves an oil addiction, and hybrids are the trendy way to detox. Compared to last year, hybrid sales are up 44 percent, with the Prius taking an astonishing 50 percent of the US hybrid market. All in all, hybrids account for 1.26 percent of the US light-duty vehicle market. As a result, there are plenty more hybrids from which to choose, and more to come, such as the Toyota Camry Hybrid and a slew of semi-serious 'brids from GM. Not all are built the same as the Insight, Civic or Prius, however. You can now buy a Highlander Hybrid, for example, get around 28 miles per gallon – and suffer in traffic, because the Highlander doesn’t reach the mpg rating required for access into car pool lanes. Same goes for the Honda Accord Hybrid, the recent batch of Lexus hybrids, and even the Ford Escape Hybrid – which is a full hybrid, but nonetheless doesn’t rate a car pool sticker. The difference between full and partial is critical to your fuel and emissions-saving agenda: A full hybrid powertrain is one that can operate on electric-only power, meaning the vehicle is propelled forward by the strength of its electric motors before the gas engine starts. The Toyota Prius and the Ford Escape Hybrid are two excellent examples of this technology, as both can go up to approximately 15 mph on the electric power. Because full hybrid powertrains actually cut the engine at stoplights and in traffic, fuel savings and pollution are significantly better than that offered by partial systems. The benefit to a partial system is better performance (electric motors can provide greater boost off the line) with improved fuel economy. The Honda Accord Hybrid is a partial hybrid and is the fastest Accord in the lineup, though doesn’t really benefit the environment: the Accord Hybrid is rated ULEV, whereas most full hybrids are rated as PZEV.


    .....More Of The Article Here
     
  2. V8Cobrakid

    V8Cobrakid Green Handyman

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    bump. it's a good article. well worth the read.
     
  3. Wildkow

    Wildkow New Member

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    Well I was going to say my foot but after reading the article I don't think that's the answer you're looking for. :rolleyes: I'm sure the answer is in the owners manual. I'll get back to you when I find it ;)

    Wildkow
     
  4. V8Cobrakid

    V8Cobrakid Green Handyman

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    in my situation, i get people asking me these questions every day. it's nice to see an article that addresses all the misc. items that we, prius owners, get tired of repeating ourselves on.
     
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