White smoke, burnt plastic smell, and car shutting off = Bad Inverter waterpump, apparently.

Discussion in 'Gen 2 Prius Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by Dragonmun, May 30, 2019.

  1. Dragonmun

    Dragonmun New Member

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    2007 Toyota Prius, 200k+ miles, touring edition
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    Yesterday I was parked (waiting for my kid to get out of school) and I started to notice a bad, burnt-plastic smell. Then there was smoke coming out from under my hood and the car shut off (save for the 12volt stuff. joy.). Opened the hood to figure out where the smoke was coming from and, since the car was off, there was nothing to be seen. Wound up having the car towed. Attempted to restart following day. It did, but the auxiliary coolant pump (AKA Inverter Water Pump, AKA Electric Inverter Coolant Pump) started smoking. Turned car off, removed pump, turned on again momentarily (and expecting all the errors). No smoke. It was definitely the pump.

    The thing is, this is the 3rd such pump that we've gone through.

    I am aware that the OEM models of these have a factory defect that, for a time, Toyota would do recall services for - but I am out of that time period. As such, we ordered a Cardone Select auxiliary coolant pump (part #5W2008) to replace it. This first pump by them failed in 2 weeks and was replaced on warranty. That replacement pump burned out 1 year later.

    Needless to say, I'm irritate because this part was supposed to fix the factory defect. Now, I'm wondering what the best pump to get is. OEM certainly lasted longer.

    Any recommendations?
     
  2. Patrick Wong

    Patrick Wong DIY Enthusiast

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    I would buy the correct Toyota part which is far from perfect but better than aftermarket.
     
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  3. jb in NE

    jb in NE Senior Member

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    Cardone is not known for making the highest quality parts, so I would go with the OEM which is almost certainly a better quality part.
     
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  4. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    As such, we ordered a Cardone Select auxiliary coolant pump (part #5W2008) to replace it. This first pump by them failed in 2 weeks and was replaced on warranty. That replacement pump burned out 1 year later. Needless to say, I'm irritate because this part was supposed to fix the factory defect. Now, I'm wondering what the best pump to get is. OEM certainly lasted longer. Any recommendations?

    I kind of think you answered your own question. Buy a Toyota pump. They're available online for about 60 bucks.....
     
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  5. exstudent

    exstudent Senior Member

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    The ORIGINAL DESIGN of the inverter pump had issue(s), thus the recall, and replacement with a REDESIGNED inverter pump. This REDESIGNED inverter pump solved the issues owners were having with the ORIGINAL design. The inverter pump on your Prius was probably replaced at some point in the past, along with many original Gen2 owners; look-up the recall service record for your Prius at Toyota.com/owners.

    LOGIC DICTATES that, ever since the recall, the inverter pump that Toyota has been manufacturing and distributing to their dealers is the REDESIGNED one. Therefore, all Toyota dealers and genuine online Toyota dealers are selling this REDESIGNED pump. How/Why can I say this with such confidence? People like to sue. What do you think would happen if Toyota or a dealer was caught selling the original pump with the bad design? Hint: jury awards $$$$$$$$$$$$$$ to plantifs. (Toyota/dealer is the defendant here.)

    Look in a mirror, and be mad at the reflection.

    Why did you NOT get the OEM pump, that has been REDESIGNED? Look at the wasted time and money the non-OEM pump cost you.

    Unofficially, read to see just how long the OEM inverter pump lasts.
    Despite the longevity of the OEM pumps, it is in you best interest to change out the pump around 100K miles, as preventative maintenance. Remember, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
    Lets say the part costs $100 at worst. $100/100,000miles = $.001/mile Cheap operating cost of the pump in terms of miles.

    Buy a genuine Toytoa OEM inverter pump from a reputable supply source: dealer or genuine online Toyota dealer.
    Counterfeits exist on Amazon. Criminals make packaging/holograms/etc, that is hard for even original manufactures to detect.
    G902047031 is the current part number (meaning REDESIGNED part); source direct from Toyota.com.
    DO NOT USE ANY OTHER PART NUMBER.
    The Part Number appears on the packaging and might also be printed/stamped on the part (when possible). Some parts are impractical to print/stamp the part number (ie gaskets).
    upload_2019-5-31_0-25-28.png
     
    #5 exstudent, May 31, 2019
    Last edited: May 31, 2019
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  6. Dragonmun

    Dragonmun New Member

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    Okay. OEM part ordered. Thank you for the part number @exstudent. That was quite helpful. :)
     
  7. SFO

    SFO Senior Member

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    Not that it matters, but we picked up the "lifetime warranty" version at Oreillys. Asked them what lifetime meant, and was told if after it fails three times they may offer me my money back to go buy the part elsewhere.

    We didn't actually need a new pump as the updated OEM pump was working fine after 90k+, it was proactively replaced as we were planning a summer trip through the desert and months prior had a single false P0a93 that I still can't figure out (it fixed itself). So far the aftermarket version hasn't failed in 50k+ miles. Might consider another proactive replacement at 100k or just let it hum along until it gives up the ghost (additional data points). Still have the old working OEM pump in case something goes south, and can always stop at Oreillys for a free replacement if on the road.
     
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