besides oil and ATF and air filter changes, what else in Prime at 40K?

Discussion in 'Prime Care, Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by The Big Sleaze, Feb 7, 2022.

  1. The Big Sleaze

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    what should I plan on doing for the next 60K or so, beside tires and maybe front brake pads and wiper blades, etc?

    Do Prime brake pads do the 'warning squeal' thing with a "squeal layer" just before they actually wear out?

    What about coolant? My 1989 Toyota Truck died at a young 380K because I changed the oil but rarely the coolant and head got porous which was common in those.

    Any weird tricks to changing coolant? Is it "high pressure" like old Saab that needs to be "burped"???

    Any belts I should change when I get a chance? Hoses?
     
  2. bisco

    bisco cookie crumbler

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    i think you have it covered. might want to keep an eye on the 12v health down the road.

    pads do squeal, and should last a long long time. brake fluid is one item that comes up in arguments from time to time. it's not in the schedule, unless they've changed it. some folks think every 3-4 years.

    fluids, plugs, etc. i would follow the schedule. coolant is a little tricky
     
  3. BiomedO1

    BiomedO1 Active Member

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    Ditto on the pads; I've been getting over 100K+ on hybrid car pads. My old ICE FWD cars usually needs pads around 60K.

    To reduce air bubbles during a coolant change, the high pressure exchange method works best. You can do an old fashion drain, fill, and burp - but you'll have to check your coolant levels every-time you run your ICE for extended periods. When air bubbles work their way out of your cooling system, your coolant levels will go down (replaces air pockets).
    Brake fluid replacement is indicated in our service manual. I prefer a full system replacement & flush. Most places will simply suck out the old brake fluid out of the reservoir, and refill it. When I bought my 2002 GMC truck, about 6 years ago; I'm pretty sure the old DOT 3 fluid had never been replaced. I dug all the sludge out of the bottom of the master cylinder reservoir, cleaned it out with new fresh DOT 3 and flushed the entire system. The brakes was much more responsive and I could now feel the anti-lock system pulsate the brakes, on an emergency stop.
    Spark Plugs @ 100K, but look at your ICE to EV ratio to make a judgement call on wear-out.
    Statistically, you'll lose one of your ignition coils somewhere between 100K to 200K miles - but then again it depends on your ICE usage.
    I'd be looking for another ATF change around 125K-150K - cheap insurance.

    CAT shield and/or motion alarm; if you haven't already installed those.:whistle:
     
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  4. Marine Ray

    Marine Ray Senior Member

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    That's the beauty of our Prius Primes - no belts, not even a timing belt/chain :)
     
  5. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Underfoot

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    Brakes deserve more attention than just when the pads are down to 1 mm. If you crack the warranty and maintenance booklet, Toyota USA recommends a more extensive brake inspection, every 3 years or 30k miles.

    I put together this Excel graph format summary for 4th gen US schedule. Haven't got creative (a little paraphrasing though), just summarizing what's in the booklet, a little more readable than Toyota USA's event-by-event format:
     

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  6. ColoradoBoo

    ColoradoBoo Active Member

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    Great job keeping up on it! Those brakes are amazing...I recently checked my wife's 2017 Prius (just under 30,000 miles) and the front pads are at 6 MM! What? (They are 10-12 MM brand new!)

    This is my maintenance list for our Priis:

    Oil/Filter: Every 6-months or 5,000 miles
    Tire Rotation Every 5,000 Miles
    Air Filter : As Needed (check every 6-months)
    Cabin Air Filter: Every 12-months (Charcoal)
    Radiator Coolant : Every 5-years or 100,000 miles
    Hybrid Coolant : Every 5-years or 100,000 miles
    CVT/AT Transmission fluid: Every 6-years
    Rear Differential (AWD model): Every 3-years
    Spark Plugs/PCV/ Radiator and Gas caps : Change every 10-years *The 2017 has no radiator cap but the 2021 does...not sure why Toyota decided to add it but probably a good idea.
    Brake Fluid Flushed: Every 4-years/50,000 miles
    Throttle Body Cleaned Every 25,000 Miles
    MAF Sensor Cleaned Every 25,000 Miles
     
  7. jdenenberg

    jdenenberg EE Professor

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    Mendel,

    One thing to do when doing a periodic brake inspection is to lubricate the slide pins. If they dry out, the pads will wear unevenly.

    I personally add to the Toyota list, drain/refill ATF at 30k, 90k and every 90k thereafter.

    JeffD
     
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  8. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Underfoot

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    Yeah I add stuff too, but I just wanted to get the big picture, with a chart, what Toyota's saying. I'm am a little puzzled why they stick with the event-by-event description: it's totally cumbersome, keeps you in the dark about intervals.
     
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