Disabling traction control on 2012 PiP

Discussion in 'Gen 1 Prius Plug-in 2012-2015' started by Coyotefred, May 2, 2018.

  1. Coyotefred

    Coyotefred Member

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    Location:
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    Vehicle:
    2012 Prius Plug-in
    Model:
    Plug-in Base
    I've searched around and read a few other threads about this issue (temporarily disabling traction control (TC) for particularly challenging traction conditions like snow and mud), but I wanted to throw a few questions to the PiP group...none of the discussions I found were more recent than 2012:
    1. Is the technique for disabling TC the same as what I've copied/pasted at the bottom? I can't seem to get it to work on my PiP... If not, what is the correct technique for the PiP?
    2. Have any of you had success disabling TC and using it in snow, mud, etc. conditions?
    3. Has there been any resolution/consensus on whether this should be done or not? 'Lots of debate I came across on this point. Some arguing that it should never been done since you risk serious damage to the drivetrain, flywheel (?), etc. Others arguing that doing this carefully on those rare occasions when you really need it is fine (and many reporting they've used the technique with no obvious issues/damage).
    I live at the end of a long, winding, 8-9% grade gravel/dirt road shared by a couple of other homeowners. I have a 4x4 that I can use when the road condition is dicey, but it isn't my daily driver. But this time of year, thunderstorms/rains can develop out of nowhere during the day, leaving me with a challenging uphill "battle" with the PiP. I have decent all-condition tires on it (General Altimax), but the traction control steals way too much valuable momentum needed to keep "forward progress" going through the muck...leaving you white-knuckling in reverse back down to take another run at it.

    Thanks!
    Colin

    ----
    [from this thread]

    These steps must be completed within 60 seconds.

    Step 1: Set the ignition switch to ON, not READY. To do this press the power
    button two times, without pressing the brake pedal.

    Step 2: While the transmission is still in park (P), fully press the gas pedal
    two times.

    Step 3: Apply the parking brake to ensure that the vehicle will not move during
    this step. Put the transmission in neutral (N) and fully press the gas pedal two
    times.

    Step 4: Put the transmission back in park (P) and fully press the gas pedal two
    times. The car will display "!Car!" in the upper left corner of the LCD screen.

    Step 5: Press the brake pedal and turn the ignition switch to the start
    position, without going back to the ready position, to start the engine.

    If these steps are followed correctly, the vehicle will start with the traction
    control system defeated.
     
  2. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk Lapsed Cargo Cultist

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    This is "Inspection Mode", outlined in the Repair Manual. It's purpose is per it's namesake, it is not intended to be used to disable traction control in day-to-day driving, there's this notice:

    upload_2018-5-2_10-11-41.png

    I'll attach a Repair Manual excerpt:
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Coyotefred

    Coyotefred Member

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    Plug-in Base
    Hello and thanks for responding.

    Yes, I'm aware that the procedure isn't intended for disabling traction control, and that Toyota has warned against it.

    Nevertheless, more than a few Prius drivers have done it in the situations I've described, but most those experiences/discussions are years old and didn't involve PiP, which is why I asked the questions I did.

    I love the PiP and it performs well in many conditions. I run Michelin snows for winter/snow and this uphill run is seldom an issue. But mud is another story...the traction control engages too early and too often, robbing the vehicle of critical momentum needed to get through the relatively worse road sections to the relatively better ones...

     
    Mendel Leisk likes this.
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