valve stem seal DIY

Discussion in 'Gen 3 Prius Care, Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by Mola, Apr 6, 2018.

  1. Mola

    Mola Junior Member

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    My idea how to do it:

    1. remove top valve core
    2. remove timing chain tensioner
    3. position crankshaft to 0 and mark crankshaft orientation
    4. mark camshaft intake and exhaust orientation
    5. unbolt the camshaft bearing
    6. hook chain on a bungee to keep tension on chain to make sure chain will not skip a teeth
    7. remove the camshaft
    8. fill the cylinder with rope the rotate crankshaft to press the rope against the valve
    9. I am still designing a tool to compress and release the ring locks to release the valve spring.
    10. replace valve seals
    11. install valve spring and lock back
    12. repeat 8-9-10-11 on other cylinder
    13. return crankshaft to 0 position,
    14. position camshaft back into position aligning the manual marks made
    15. torque the camshaft bearing
    16. install the timing chain tensioner
    17. reinstall the valve cover.


    Seems that simple, because this is just a guess basing on how i see the parts design on ebay. my worry is the timing change down on the crankshaft sprocket skips a teeth that is why I am planning to keep tension on the chain to keep it from losing contact with the bottom sprocket.

    I really need to buy a repair manual.
     
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  2. Tande

    Tande Active Member

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    I'm reading & listening! .....are we zeroing/in with evidence that the VSS are a suspicious part of the oil burning mystery??:unsure:
     
  3. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    You might be able to do it that way (I've never tried), without removing the camshaft housing (because that I don't think you can do without removing the timing cover, and then you're in hip deep). If you spin things around until you get the two colored links at their proper places next to the sprocket marks, that will save you having to make marks of your own. But,

    • You'll need some way of keeping the chain secure against the crank sprocket while you are moving the crankshaft around, and
    • The colored links won't be back at their proper places every two crank revolutions. They'll show back up there every n crank revolutions, where n is an even number you can figure out from the number of chain links and sprocket teeth (which are numbers I don't know offhand), or you can just keep cranking around until they do. (It could be several dozen revs.) Or you could just turn the crank backwards when you're done, and line the marked links right back up. Either way, your method of keeping the chain mated to the crank sprocket has to be up to the job.

    Some of the cam bearing cap bolts just hold the bearing caps to the camshaft housing, while others hold the caps and housing together down to the cylinder head. You'll be modifying the torque sequence a bit when you reassemble (because the factory sequence assembles the cams and caps to the housing first, then sets the whole schmear onto the head, which won't be the way you do it). You'll want to be careful not to stress the form-in-place-gasket holding the housing to the head.

    Finally, yes, you really do want the repair manual. $15 over at techinfo.toyota.com gets you in. Be sure you study how the "sprocket" on one of the two camshafts is actually the valve timing adjuster, and the specific moves (and compressed-air trick) for getting it off and back on.

    -Chap
     
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  4. Mola

    Mola Junior Member

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    Yes, i will still be using the chain marks, the marks will be a back up, making sure that the below sprocket did not skip a tooth, since the timing chain cover will be undisturbed and i won't be able see the chain marking below.

    With the camshaft sprocket removed, while still on bungee tension, I am thinking of sliding a 4 inc PVC pipe for the chain to loop on, and have the pvc pipe apply tension on the chain maybe also with a bungee. So by the time i turn the crankshaft, chain should slide around the pipe. And yes since it is a 4 stroke engine, it takes 2 cranks for the camshafts align.

    Guide i saw is for a 2zr-fe corolla.

    I just don't understand on the longer bolts that bolt into the head, missing in the sequence are 4-5-6, 10-11-12, 16-17-18, 22-23-24.

    Reassembling, according to guide, just reverse it. So seems like the assembling will be done on top of the head.
     

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  5. padroo

    padroo Senior Member

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    Have you considered pumping up the cylinders one at a time with air to hold the valves closed and skip the rope, pun intended. I have done this on cam in block engines but not overhead cam designs.
    All you need is a cheap adapter to screw into the spark plug hole and an air compressor.


     
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  6. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    Indeed, the camshafts will be back to their index positions every 2 crank revolutions. You just can't expect to visually confirm it every 2 crank revolutions, with the colored chain links next to the proper marks on the cam sprockets, because those links won't be there every time. That will only happen every 2Q crank revolutions, where you can determine Q if you know the number of cam sprocket teeth and the number of links in the chain, following this post. (If you're happy winging it without the visual confirmation, it doesn't matter.)

    -Chap
     
  7. edthefox5

    edthefox5 Senior Member

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    You will need Toyota manual 2-3. I just looked at it and its alot of work and requires SST 09023-38400 to get the cam out and then the chain is tied off to keep tension on it from popping off the crank. But first you have to stake the chain tension with a screwdriver going through the service hole. Its a 8 mm hex key bolt to access that hole. Then it requires a 3 mm rod to lock down the tensioner and on and on.

    On your way in to the valves it pays to measure valve lifter clearance because if you after seals the lifters are probably worn out too.
    And maybe the cams. Never heard of anyone replacing valve seals on a 1NZ-FXE motor on this site. If anything that worn out on the top end the bottom is worn too. Lifetime of crappy dino oil.

    Easier and faster and maybe cheaper in the long run to get a new motor.
     
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  8. TMR-JWAP

    TMR-JWAP Senior Member

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    This is killin' me............
     
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  9. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    OP has a 2ZR. Where the lifters are self adjusting, and the skies are not cloudy all day.

    -Chap
     
  10. edthefox5

    edthefox5 Senior Member

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  11. David Beale

    David Beale Senior Member

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    I was going to post about the 2 crank revs. per one camshaft rev. but was beaten to it. To tell which rev. is which, watch the cylinder "opposite" of the #1, that is, skip the next cylinder in the firing order, and the one after that (on a four cylinder). The valves will "cross" on it at TDC, for cylinder #1, that is, the exhaust will be opening while the intake will be closing (or the other way round, can't remember, but it doesn't matter, they "cross" when #1 is at TDC. THEN watch the timing marks to get it exact.
     
  12. ChapmanF

    ChapmanF Senior Member

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    If you're willing to go a few more revs around, you can actually use some nice brightly-colored links that Toyota built into the chain for you, to completely confirm that everything is right where it should be.
     
  13. Figster10

    Figster10 Member

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    Dumb question: do you have to remove the timing chain cover to access the timing chain tensioner? I need to change out cam and crankshaft
     
  14. edthefox5

    edthefox5 Senior Member

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    Yes.

    Sounds like a lot of work. Maybe easier to replace with used engine lots out there.
     
  15. Figster10

    Figster10 Member

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    "Timing chain will be undisturbed..." ????

    You had to at some point remove the timing chain cover, right? I'm going to take on the repair tonight and take my time but any advice would be greatly appreciated. I know how to get to the valve cover and stuff but the hard part for me is not being familiar with the timing chain situation, yet. I'm pretty car savy so it's not like I'm just throwing darts here
     
  16. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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  17. Mendel Leisk

    Mendel Leisk 'Orrible Oracle

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    Looks like no. This may get you started:
     

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  18. Figster10

    Figster10 Member

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    Awesome video!!! I was looking all over for a tutorial on this exact same thing here.

    One more question...
    Has anyone ever seen these heads get warped? I keep hearing usually they never get warped at least for the gen 2 they don't
     
  19. Figster10

    Figster10 Member

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    Duuuuuuuuude lo . This is exactly what I thought was the case. Toyota tries to make it very convenient for this kind of work which is why I thought it didnt need a whole timing chain cover job to do this.
     
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  20. edthefox5

    edthefox5 Senior Member

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    G2 heads warp pretty easily if car run out of coolant or oil and the engine. Since no temp gauge By the time the over heat icon comes on dash its too late aluminum head is easy to warp.

    That and your posting in the G3 forum. Different engines.
     
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